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The Playlist

"DVD Is the New Vinyl" Podcast: Featuring Tilda Swinton, Alessandro Nivola & Lili Taylor

  • By Aaron Hillis
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  • March 21, 2014 1:45 PM
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  • 6 Comments
"DVD Is the New Vinyl" Podcast: Featuring Tilda Swinton, Alessandro Nivola, Lili Taylor
While recuperating from a deep-fried, ever-boozy, never-sleepy nine days at the SXSW Film Festival (a shout-out here to senior programmer Jarod Neece, whose delicious book "Austin Breakfast Tacos: The Story of the Most Important Taco of the Day" resolved at least two hangovers), your indefatigable DVD guru still managed to power through a month's worth of new discs. Two of this month's highlights, as noted in the "10 Worth a Spin" intro, were SXSW 2013 premieres, which goes to show that there's still life to be found for festival indies beyond traditional theatrical or VOD distribution. One question, though: how does anyone in Austin get their DVDs to play without smudging them up from greasy burrito fingers?

DVD Is The New Vinyl: Famous Pimps, Infamous Early Fassbinder & 'Q: The Winged Serpent'

  • By Aaron Hillis
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  • August 28, 2013 5:10 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Dvd is the new vinyl, fassbinder, body double, more
“Truthfully, DVD is not the new vinyl," a reader recently confronted me, arguing that the beloved analog qualities of records (the richer, warmer recording; that nostalgic hiss and crackle) are fetishized in ways that most movies on digital discs are not. Sure, the latter may be closer in spirit to CDs and don't get any better with age like ye olde phonographs, but tell that to Twilight Time, the below-the-radar, two-man boutique label that has been making cineaste tongues wag over their limited-edition, lovingly remastered Blu-rays of film classics like "The Big Heat," "Bonjour Tristesse" and "Enemy Mine."

DVD Is The New Vinyl: Rock Hudson Has 'Seconds,' Nazi Escapes & 'Ishtar'

  • By Aaron Hillis
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  • August 6, 2013 3:06 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Before digging into early-to-mid August's disc highlights, I'd like to set the Way Back Machine to two weeks ago and point out some eclectic late-July gems we missed, such as Twilight Time's exquisite Blu-ray edition of Walter Hill's 1978 neo-noir "The Driver," Olive Films' unexpected release of Anthony Mann's 1958 brazen, quasi-hicksploitation melodrama "God's Little Acre," and the Warner Archive re-release of 1998's eccentrically funny "Zero Effect," starring Ben Stiller and Bill Pullman as a socially stunted private investigator. From Europe, Raro Video lived up to their name with a rare trilogy of gritty moralist thrillers in "Fernando di Leo: The Italian Crime Collection (Volume 2)," Music Box Films stressed us out with the terrifically icy German thriller "The Silence," and sci-fi didn't get more provocative than the erotic Lithuanian curiosity "Vanishing Waves" (which Artsploitation lovingly packaged as a two-DVD set that includes director Kristina Buozyte's feature debut "The Collectress"). Are you caught up? Super, let's push on...

Video Free Brooklyn Presents: "DVD Is The New Vinyl" Best of June Edition

  • By Aaron Hillis
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  • June 28, 2013 2:15 PM
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  • 6 Comments
June DVDs
My appetite for finding and devouring new music is so voracious that I have to empty my hard drive annually just to make room for more MP3s, yet it wasn't until my wife bought me a turntable that I became one of those obsessive, fetishistic record collectors right out of "High Fidelity."

5 April DVD Titles You Should Know About, Including 'Chinatown,' 'A Trip To The Moon' & 'Girl On A Motorcycle'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 4, 2012 2:05 PM
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  • 8 Comments
While the future of home entertainment may be rapidly moving towards a digital streaming-led future, we can't be the only movie nerds who still love owning a physical copy of something. Sure, Blu-Ray and DVD might be scratchable, easily lost and adorned by terrible box art, but there's something about the feeling of finding an undiscovered gem in the depths of a store, or getting a rarity in the post, that doesn't quite compare to clicking and watching something on Netflix.

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