Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Billy Bob Thornton Talks Directing 'Jayne Mansfield's Car' & Looks Back On 'Sling Blade,' 'Armageddon,' 'Bad Santa' & More

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • September 13, 2013 2:06 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
These days, most people think of Billy Bob Thornton as an actor, thanks to his unforgettable performances in pictures like the Coens’ “The Man Who Wasn’t There,” Sam Raimi’s “A Simple Plan” and Terry Zwigoff’s “Bad Santa,” so much so that it’s easy to forget that Thornton wrote, directed and starred in the Academy-Award winning “Sling Blade” (Best Adapted) and co-wrote genre classics like Carl Franklin’s “One False Move” and Raimi’s “The Gift.” His latest effort as a co-writer, director, and star is “Jayne Mansfield's Car,” which opens today in theaters and on demand, a charming comedic drama about a southern family whose matriarch leaves, marries a man in England, and then dies (you can read our review from Berlin earlier this year here). The movie takes place on the eve of her funeral, with the two families (one stiff-upper-lip, one deep-fried-south) collide.

Interview: Luc Besson Talks Scorsese's Influence On 'The Family,' Returning To Sci-Fi & Not Getting Paid For 'Nikita'

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • September 12, 2013 5:40 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
On Friday, Luc Besson, the madcap French filmmaker behind "Nikita," "Leon: The Professional," and "The Fifth Element," takes a break from overseeing his European action genre movie empire to, unleash his newest directorial effort, "The Family." The movie stars Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer as former mobsters sent off to live in Normandy, France, as a very extreme form of witness relocation (Tommy Lee Jones is their gruff FBI handler). Like most of Besson's other concoctions, it veers wildly from extreme violence to maudlin melodrama to broad physical humor, sometimes in the same scene. This is par for the course with Besson.

Interview: Nicole Holofcener Talks Working With The Late James Gandolfini & Julia Louis-Dreyfus For 'Enough Said'

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 12, 2013 2:33 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Enough Said, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Gandolfini
Writer/director Nicole Holofcener has only made five movies since 1996 (including “Walking and Talking,” “Lovely and Amazing,” “Friends With Money,” and “Please Give”), but each is an insightful, smart, female-centric gem about modern human connections.

Interview: Jonathan Glazer Talks The Guerilla Shoot Of His Bold 'Under The Skin' Starring Scarlett Johansson

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • September 12, 2013 1:26 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Under The Skin
It has been close to a decade since commercials and music video director turned filmmaker Jonathan Glazer released his sophomore feature film, “Birth.” Following his slick and stylish debut, the gangster flick “Sexy Beast,” the film marked a leap forward stylistically, with longer takes, a bold visual approach and a carefully considered integration of narrative and score. And now with his third film, “Under The Skin,” Glazer has again pushed the language of his filmmaking into bold and truly exciting places.

Kelly Reichardt Talks Her Eco-Thriller ‘Night Moves,’ The Mysteries Of Co-Star Dakota Fanning & More

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 11, 2013 3:38 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Night Moves, Kelly Reichardt
Director Kelly Reichardt (“Wendy and Lucy,” “Meek’s Cutoff’) has an eye for vast American landscapes, in which she deliberately places lonesome, trudging souls who are continuously searching—for connections, for new lives, for meaning.

Interview: Steve McQueen Talks '12 Years A Slave,' 'Django Unchained', Pitt & Fassbender & More

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 11, 2013 2:37 PM
  • |
  • 9 Comments
Steve McQueen, 12 Years A Slave
With “Hunger,”his feature debut in 2008, Turner Prize-winning artist-turned-director Steve McQueen made a bold statement right out of the gate: he was a filmmaker to watch. Three years later, “Shame” solidified his reputation as an audacious director with an unflinching eye. And now, with “12 Years a Slave,” which screened this week at the Toronto International Film Festival after premiering at Telluride, McQueen has made what is destined to become the definitive film about slavery in the American South (you can read our review of the film here).

Interview: Mia Wasikowska Talks Working With Richard Ayoade & Jesse Eisenberg In "The Double'

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 11, 2013 1:44 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
The Double
At just 23, Australian actress Mia Wasikowska has already proven her impressive range. In roles spanning “In Treatment,” “Jane Eyre,” “Alice in Wonderland,” and “The Kids are All Right,” audiences have come to appreciate her gentle and elegant thoughtfulness, mixed at times with a wisdom seemingly beyond her years.

Watch: Richard Ayoade Talks His Unsettling (And Awesome) TIFF Drama 'The Double' Starring Jesse Eisenberg

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 10, 2013 5:15 PM
  • |
  • 7 Comments
The Double, Richard Ayoade
At the world premiere of “The Double,” British director Richard Ayoade’s second film, Toronto International Film Festival Artistic Director Cameron Bailey called Ayoade “one of the sharpest wits” in filmmaking, and the audience reacted with unbridled glee. New directors are rarely so well known, but Ayoade is also a comedic actor—most notably as “Moss” in the TV series “The IT Crowd”—who made his directorial debut three years ago at Toronto with the cult favorite (and critically admired) “Submarine,” a coming-of-age tale about an eccentric outsider.

TIFF Interview: Daniel Radcliffe & Juno Temple Talk The Horror Fairy Tale 'Horns'

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • September 9, 2013 1:20 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
TIFF: Daniel Radcliffe & Juno Temple Talk The Horror Fairytale 'Horns'
Harry Potter no more, young British star Daniel Radcliffe is having a hell of a Toronto International Film Festival, starring determinedly in three very diverse features: he’s a hopeless romantic in “The F Word” opposite Zoe Kazan, a college-aged Allen Ginsberg in “Kill Your Darlings,” and a mourning lover confronting his very literal demons in Alexandre Aja’s “Horns.” We got to sit down with Radcliffe and his comely costar Juno Temple to talk about "Horns," which is still looking for distribution.

Interview: 'Touchy Feely' Director Lynn Shelton Talks Her Meditative Film, Cronenbergian Deleted Scenes & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
  • |
  • September 4, 2013 1:03 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Lynn Shelton
A different form of improvisation is felt in “Touchy Feely,” the fifth feature from Lynn Shelton; instead of the loose outlines and dialogue of the director’s recent films (“Your Sister’s Sister,” “Humpday”), it’s the film’s subjective and technical experience that feels crafted on the spot and cemented in the editing room. We follow two siblings -- masseuse Abby (Rosemarie DeWitt) and introverted dentist Josh Pais – as they adjust to their surroundings following an unexplained shift in personal energy, and Shelton achieves this through use of micro closeups, swirling sound effects, and an exploratory pace.

Email Updates

Recent Comments