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The Playlist

Park Chan-wook Talks Differences Between Korean & American Films, How 'Stoker' Fits In With His Filmography & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 19, 2013 7:00 PM
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If there is one movie that has caused unending debate around The Playlist water-cooler, it's Park Chan-wook's English-language debut "Stoker." First screened at Sundance and making its slow creep across the country now, it's a twisty, unerringly perverse riff on Alfred Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt," wherein a mysterious Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) comes to visit his long lost family following his brother's equally mysterious demise. Mia Wasikowska plays the young daughter of the deceased, and an admirably batty Nicole Kidman is the new widow. We got to sit down with director Park and discuss what made "Stoker" so appealing as his first English language movie, how he decided on the composers for the film, and where the film fits in with his filmography.

Interview: Eddie Pepitone Talks Deconstructionist Comedy, The Seven Stages to Accepting Yourself Onscreen, & Saying Yes To 'The Bitter Buddha'

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • March 17, 2013 8:32 AM
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Eddie Pepitone is a comic’s comic, a deconstructionist stand-up comic with a scream like no other, who’s willing to put everyone, most often himself, under the microscope. Pepitone gets that treatment in the documentary film "The Bitter Buddha," directed by Steven Feinartz. It’s an engaging portrait of this man and an instant classic film about comedy that will be fascinating to comedy nerds and mainstream audiences alike. In our review, we said the film is 'a portrait of an interesting and endearing misanthrope,' and we got a chance to talk to the man himself on the day of his film’s premiere at the Cinema Village in New York City.

Video: Gillian Jacobs & Ken Marino On Why ‘Milo’ Is Just “Good Butt Fun”

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 15, 2013 12:40 PM
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Unfortunately, when we talked to Ken Marino at SXSW earlier this week, the “Veronica Mars” Kickstarter campaign had not yet been announced, so there’s no word yet on whether Vinnie Van Lowe will return for the movie, already greenlit for this summer. What did we talk about? Marino’s gross-out monster movie – he describes it as “good butt fun” – which premiered in Austin this week.

Video: Joe Swanberg Talks His "Breakthrough" Feature 'Drinking Buddies' Starring Olivia Wilde, Anna Kendrick & Jake Johnson

  • By Edward Davis
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  • March 14, 2013 6:27 PM
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Joe Swanberg, the indie director arguably responsible for the DIY aesthetic known as "mumblecore" (though don't fully blame him, he didn't coin the term) is the most prolific filmmaker alive. OK, maybe not quite, but since 2005, the filmmaker has made about 14 feature-length films. That's not quite an average of two films per year between 2005-2013, but it's close (and it doesn't even include the shorts he's made). His debut, "Kissing on the Mouth" kicked off this movement when it was heralded as a hit at SXSW and since then he's become known for micro-budgeted indies like "Hannah Takes The Stairs" (which helped launch Greta Gerwig's career), "Nights & Weekends" and "Alexander The Last."

Interview: Robin Wright On The Texas Hall Of Fame Awards, 'House of Cards,' The 'Dragon Tattoo' Sequel & Her Amazing Hair

  • March 7, 2013 6:28 PM
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There are a lot of twists on the new David Fincher-produced Netflix series "House of Cards," which follows a devious, BBQ-loving congressman (Kevin Spacey) who looks to exact revenge upon the President of the United States after being instrumental in his election (and then passed over for a high profile cabinet position). But no one could have possibly imagined how wonderful Robin Wright, who plays Spacey's wife (in a role that oscillates between Martha Stewart, Hillary Clinton and Lady Macbeth), really is. She's sleek and sexy and absolutely lethal, but sympathetic and occasionally loving too. And the accomplishment hasn't gone unnoticed. The night before the South by Southwest Film Festival kicks off, Wright will be honored at the Texas Hall Of Fame Awards, which is put on by the Austin Film Society (Wright was born in Dallas). We got to talk to Wright about "House of Cards," the Texas Hall of Fame Awards, where the next "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" is and, most importantly, her hair.

Interview: Noomi Rapace Talks 'Dead Man Down,' Her Violent '90s Influences & Working With Isabelle Huppert

  • March 6, 2013 4:32 PM
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As far as foreign actresses making the leap to American projects, Noomi Rapace, who made a splash worldwide in the Swedish "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (and its two subsequent films), has done quite well for herself. After introducing herself to domestic audiences with a supporting turn in Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Homes: Game of Shadows," she went on to a high profile turn last summer in Ridley Scott's "Alien" prequel/sequel/whatever "Prometheus," and will again be courting mainstream American super-stardom this weekend in "Dead Man Down," a surprisingly solid revenge movie from her "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" director Niels Arden Oplev. We talked to her about what drew her to "Dead Man Down," what it was like working with Isabelle Huppert, and the violent '90s movies inspired her performance.

Interview: Director Pablo Larrain On The Unique Aesthetic Of 'No' & Working With Star Gael García Bernal

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 12, 2013 2:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
We've had the usual rotten start to moviegoing in 2013, but this Friday brings the first truly great film of 2013 in the shape of Pablo Larrain's "No." The third film from Chilean director Pablo Larrain following the excellent "Tony Manero" and "Post Mortem," it again delves into the history of the country during the time when it was ruled by the dictator General Pinochet. But in something of a break from his previous work, the film is a warm and human comedy that follows an advertising executive (Gael García Bernal) who's enlisted to aid the campaign to vote 'No' in the 1988 referendum to keep Pinochet as leader.

Interview: Director David Lowery Discusses His Sundance Sensation 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' & Assembling 'Upstream Color'

  • By Cory Everett
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  • February 1, 2013 10:21 AM
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David Lowery went from being a relative unknown to having one of the heavily anticipated films of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, the outlaw drama, “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.” Though his most recent short film “Pioneer” picked up acclaim at the festival in 2011, not many saw his previous micro budgeted feature “St. Nick,” a dreamy brother-sister tale which cast only non-professional actors. And yet the anticipation for this film was off the charts thanks in part to the casting of Casey Affleck, Rooney Mara, Ben Foster, Keith Carradine and Nate Parker for this “Bonnie & Clyde”-like tale of criminals determined to reunite with each other at whatever cost.

Interview: Steven Soderbergh Talks The “Eye Candy” Of ‘Candelabra’ & What His Retirement From Filmmaking Actually Means

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • January 30, 2013 2:26 PM
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  • 7 Comments
Filmmaker Steven Soderbergh is winding down and this has been the case for a while now. His five-year plan meant retiring from filmmaking at the age of 50. Having just reached this touchstone earlier this month, Soderbergh is essentially done with the business of moviemaking. His final theatrical film, “Side Effects” starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law and Catherine Zeta-Jones, is complete and his final, final film, “Behind The Candelabra,” is also complete and will air on HBO later this year following a likely premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. So what’s left? Aside from promoting these last two movies, he’s done… for now.

'Animal House' Director John Landis Talks "Charles Manson In High School" Origins, Cast & The Legacy Of The Comedy Classic

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • January 29, 2013 4:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Tomorrow night, at San Francisco's San Francisco Comedy Festival, hosted by SF Sketchfest, is a 35th anniversary retrospective screening of John Landis' 1978 college comedy classic "National Lampoon's Animal House." Following the screening will be a Q&A and conversation between Landis and writer/comedian, Carl Arnheiter. In anticipation of this event, we got to chat with Landis about the making of this seminal comedy, plus myriad other topics. As anyone who has seen or heard Landis speak over the years knows that he can talk at length about anything. The director of "Trading Places," "The Blues Brothers," "Coming to America," "An American Werewolf in London" and more '80s classics, Landis' encyclopedic knowledge of cinema makes Quentin Tarantino seem like an unlearned noob, so on the eve of screening and conversation we're going to pare down our chat with Landis to just focus on "Animal House." More stories from the always-chatty director (and king of anecdotes) to come.

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