The Playlist

Interview: Tony Gilroy Talks The Challenges Of Mounting 'The Bourne Legacy,' Addresses The 'Enhancement' Concerns & More

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • August 9, 2012 3:25 PM
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  • 3 Comments
"The Bourne Legacy" could be seen by some as a long-time coming for writer/director Tony Gilroy. While the almost billion-dollar grossing series has been defined by Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass, arguably the man behind the scenes masterminding many of the strings was Gilroy, who wrote all three 'Bourne' films (two writers were hired to work on 'Ultimatum' after his first draft).

The Playlist Q&A: Spike Lee Talks 'Red Hook Summer,' Hollywood, Michael Jackson & More

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • August 9, 2012 3:07 PM
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  • 2 Comments
The Republic of Brooklyn and its ongoing chronicles have taken director Spike Lee all over New York's brightest and best borough (its estimated that if Brooklyn was its own city it would be the third largest in the United States). "Do The Right Thing" took place in Bed-Stuyvesant, parts of "Jungle Fever" took place in Bensonhurst, while Harlem-centric "Mo' Better Blues" homebase was Dumbo, "Clockers" was set among the Boerum Hill projects, "He Got Game" landed in Coney Island and "She’s Gotta Have It" was centered in Fort Greene where Lee lived for many years, to name a few.

'The Watch' Director Akiva Schaffer Talks The Influence Of 'Alien' & 'Ghostbusters', Working With Doug Jones & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • July 25, 2012 12:03 PM
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As one-third of The Lonely Island, the comedy collective behind the SNL Digital Shorts, Akiva Schaffer (along with confederates Andy Samberg and Jorma Taccone) efficiently optimized "Saturday Night Live," a flagging late night mainstay, into something vital and immediate. With the Digital Shorts format, placing an emphasis on music video rhythms and absurdity that bordered on the surreal, they re-contextualized the show into bite-size nuggets you could swap with friends or post on Facebook. But there's more to Schaffer than "Jizz in My Pants" (although, honestly, if that was the only thing he directed that'd still be pretty awesome).

Christopher Nolan Talks The Politics & Influences Of 'The Dark Knight Rises' & More From the Film's Press Tour

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 24, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
"The Dark Knight Rises" is finally in theaters, and has been inspiring furious debate all weekend and into this week. But what there's relatively little of, compared to most major blockbusters, is thoughts on the film, and its production, from the filmmakers and cast themselves. Christopher Nolan is relatively press-shy (he doesn't do online press at all, outside press conferences), and compared to the onslaught of interviews that most tentpoles unleash, "The Dark Knight Rises" knew it was a sure thing, and didn't feel the need to chuck out the same sound bites endlessly.

Exclusive: Tony Gilroy Pulls The Curtain Back On The Secretive 'The Bourne Legacy'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 20, 2012 12:08 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Tony Gilroy has a mini-armada at his disposal. In June of 2012, in an unassuming block of offices in midtown Manhattan, the writer/director is sequestered with a team of editors orchestrating the next installment of Universal’s lucrative ‘Bourne’ franchise, which grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwide theatrically and a surfeit more from DVD and omnipresent cable appearances. But Gilroy -- who was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay in 2007 for "Michael Clayton," and is the author of all three original ‘Bourne’ scripts -- isn’t simply mounting a reboot or a reimagining, or conducting a linear sequel. Instead, the filmmaker is attempting to pull off a feat rarely attempted with Hollywood tentpoles: a parallel circumnavigation of the familiar ‘Bourne’ narrative told through the eyes of another agent.

Exclusive: 'Looper' Director Rian Johnson On Transforming Joseph Gordon-Levitt & The Hour Of Deleted Scenes On The DVD

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 16, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
It's an interesting time for fans of science-fiction out there. While many of the biggest movies in the genre have tinges of sci-fi, they're mostly action-adventures in disguise, with fantastic CGI embellishments. But we've also had a string of lower-budget fare in the last few years that have embraced the more idea-led aspects of the genre -- think Duncan Jones' "Moon," Gareth Edwards' "Monsters," or Neill Blomkamp's "District 9." And the latest to join them is a man who's already made something of a specialty out of deconstructing genre tropes with his teen-noir "Brick" and meta-caper "The Brothers Bloom" -- director Rian Johnson.

Mark Cousins On ‘What Is This Film Called Love,’ PJ Harvey, 'Prometheus' & “The Sadness Of Time Passing”

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 14, 2012 12:33 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Having seen and loved Mark Cousins’ almost unreviewably subjective “What Is This Film Called Love” on its international premiere at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival last week (read about that experience here), we got to sit down with Cousins in person pretty much immediately afterwards. And it felt rather like walking straight back into the film we had just left: ‘What Is This Film’ is so unapologetically personal that it’s difficult to escape the feeling that, like him or not, you kind of know Cousins by the end of it.

Exclusive: Rian Johnson Says 'Looper' Stopped Him From Directing On 'Game Of Thrones,' Hopes It Might Still Happen One Day

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 14, 2012 11:20 AM
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  • 1 Comment
In between being one of the more exciting young directors we have at the moment, Rian Johnson has been keeping his helming muscles sharp by working on some of the more acclaimed TV series of the last few years. In the four years between "The Brothers Bloom" and the upcoming "Looper," Johnson helmed a divisive third-season episode of "Breaking Bad" entitled "Fly" (one of this writer's favorites on the show), as well as a cracking installment of the short-lived and much-missed "Terriers."

Exclusive: Neill Blomkamp Says Sci-Fi Comedy 'Chappie' Is "Probably" Next, Has No Immediate Plans For 'District 9' Sequel

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 13, 2012 9:09 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Neill Blomkamp made one of the more most impressive directorial debuts in recent memory back in 2009 when "District 9" hit theaters; a firmly original, tonally dextrous science-fiction actioner that proved to be a serious sleeper hit, and caused many to compare him to the likes of James Cameron, or indeed his executive producer Peter Jackson.

'The Imposter' Director Bart Layton Talks The Stranger Than Fiction Story & Its Subjective Nature

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • July 13, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The Barclay family suffered a devastating blow in 1994 when 13-year-old Nicholas disappeared without a trace. However, 1997 brought a sign of hope -- the young boy had been found in Spain. Seemingly damaged due to sexual abuse by his captors, he was ready to come home. The only problem? It wasn't Nicholas at all -- Frenchman Frédéric Bourdin adopted his identity, fooling authorities and the Barclay clan themselves into thinking that he was the real deal. As you might imagine, it wasn't long before someone started to doubt this ruse (detective Charlie Parker, oddly enough, noticed the ears of Bourdin and Nicholas didn't match up), but the exposed identity only makes the situation uglier, ferreting some nasty theories concerning the whereabouts of the real Nicholas Barclay.

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