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The Playlist

The Playlist Profile: Melanie Lynskey Talks Hollywood, 'Hello I Must Be Going,' 'Heavenly Creatures' & More

  • By Maris James
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  • September 4, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 8 Comments
It’s coming on 20 years since Melanie Lynskey appeared in her first film, but she cannot get used to seeing herself on screen. “It’s awful. Awful,” she says in her kiwi accent, characteristically wide open and soft spoken, over iced teas in Manhattan’s East Village. She has a new movie coming out, “Hello I Must Be Going,” in which she’s the lead and is in every scene -- a first for the actor. Her work in this film is widely being referred to as her breakout performance, which could be a frustrating identification for anyone who saw her in “Heavenly Creatures,” almost two decades ago. Many are hoping the label sticks this time, but after so many years in movies and television, Lynskey refuses to have expectations about where her career is headed.

Rebecca Hall Talks 'The Awakening,' 'Iron Man 3' & How "You Can't Fake Adrenaline"

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • August 21, 2012 12:00 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Since first emerging on screen in 2006 at the age of 24, with impressive roles in "The Prestige" and "Starter For Ten," Rebecca Hall has been one of the most exciting young actresses of her generation. Cropping up in everything from Woody Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" and Ron Howard's "Frost/Nixon" to Nicole Holofcener's "Please Give" and Ben Affleck's "The Town," Hall has consistently wowed in her smaller performances, even winning a BAFTA for her turn in "Red Riding: In The Year Of Our Lord 1974."

Paul Dano Confirms He Tested For ‘Akira,’ Says Someone Like Rian Johnson Should Direct

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • August 20, 2012 4:24 PM
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  • 1 Comment
One of the busier actors in show business has to be twenty-eight year-old Paul Dano. Having turned heads in the moody indie “L.I.E.” when he was only sixteen years old, it was only years later before he was able to stand toe-to-toe with Daniel Day-Lewis in “There Will Be Blood,” cementing his status as a fresh face that wasn’t going anywhere. His latest role is in “For Ellen,” where he plays a rock musician struggling to regain custody of his daughter. However, one look at what’s happened to the others films he’s been linked to in recent months casts a clearer picture of just how in demand he has been, and how opportunities can sometimes fall by the wayside for a variety of reasons.

Julie Delpy Talks Exposing Herself In '2 Days In New York' & Talks About The Film's Great Cameo

  • By Jen Vineyard
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  • August 10, 2012 4:20 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Julie Delpy is about to fly to Greece, so she's making her last-minute arrangements. First she needs a dress -- and she only has fifteen minutes to shop. And then there's the weather -- will New York have any more of those insane storm clouds that could delay her flight? And finally, she arranges to pick up a prescription for some anti-anxiety pills -- not so she can take them, but so she can know that they're there; their mere presence wards off "major crazy stress...so I can sleep." Life has been so hectic, "I don't even have a minute to myself," the writer/director/actress confessed to the Playlist. "I can barely go to the bathroom! Don't worry," she laughed. "I can keep it in. I can squeeze!" [editor's note: FYI, later in this story, Delpy herself reveals the identity of the wickedly funny cameo in the film. If you haven't seen it, we suggest you proceed with caution; though knowing who it is beforehand likely won't spoil your enjoyment of this terrific film]

Interview: Tony Gilroy Talks The Challenges Of Mounting 'The Bourne Legacy,' Addresses The 'Enhancement' Concerns & More

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • August 9, 2012 3:25 PM
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  • 3 Comments
"The Bourne Legacy" could be seen by some as a long-time coming for writer/director Tony Gilroy. While the almost billion-dollar grossing series has been defined by Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass, arguably the man behind the scenes masterminding many of the strings was Gilroy, who wrote all three 'Bourne' films (two writers were hired to work on 'Ultimatum' after his first draft).

The Playlist Q&A: Spike Lee Talks 'Red Hook Summer,' Hollywood, Michael Jackson & More

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • August 9, 2012 3:07 PM
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  • 2 Comments
The Republic of Brooklyn and its ongoing chronicles have taken director Spike Lee all over New York's brightest and best borough (its estimated that if Brooklyn was its own city it would be the third largest in the United States). "Do The Right Thing" took place in Bed-Stuyvesant, parts of "Jungle Fever" took place in Bensonhurst, while Harlem-centric "Mo' Better Blues" homebase was Dumbo, "Clockers" was set among the Boerum Hill projects, "He Got Game" landed in Coney Island and "She’s Gotta Have It" was centered in Fort Greene where Lee lived for many years, to name a few.

'The Watch' Director Akiva Schaffer Talks The Influence Of 'Alien' & 'Ghostbusters', Working With Doug Jones & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • July 25, 2012 12:03 PM
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  • 0 Comments
As one-third of The Lonely Island, the comedy collective behind the SNL Digital Shorts, Akiva Schaffer (along with confederates Andy Samberg and Jorma Taccone) efficiently optimized "Saturday Night Live," a flagging late night mainstay, into something vital and immediate. With the Digital Shorts format, placing an emphasis on music video rhythms and absurdity that bordered on the surreal, they re-contextualized the show into bite-size nuggets you could swap with friends or post on Facebook. But there's more to Schaffer than "Jizz in My Pants" (although, honestly, if that was the only thing he directed that'd still be pretty awesome).

Christopher Nolan Talks The Politics & Influences Of 'The Dark Knight Rises' & More From the Film's Press Tour

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 24, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
"The Dark Knight Rises" is finally in theaters, and has been inspiring furious debate all weekend and into this week. But what there's relatively little of, compared to most major blockbusters, is thoughts on the film, and its production, from the filmmakers and cast themselves. Christopher Nolan is relatively press-shy (he doesn't do online press at all, outside press conferences), and compared to the onslaught of interviews that most tentpoles unleash, "The Dark Knight Rises" knew it was a sure thing, and didn't feel the need to chuck out the same sound bites endlessly.

Exclusive: Tony Gilroy Pulls The Curtain Back On The Secretive 'The Bourne Legacy'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 20, 2012 12:08 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Tony Gilroy has a mini-armada at his disposal. In June of 2012, in an unassuming block of offices in midtown Manhattan, the writer/director is sequestered with a team of editors orchestrating the next installment of Universal’s lucrative ‘Bourne’ franchise, which grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwide theatrically and a surfeit more from DVD and omnipresent cable appearances. But Gilroy -- who was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay in 2007 for "Michael Clayton," and is the author of all three original ‘Bourne’ scripts -- isn’t simply mounting a reboot or a reimagining, or conducting a linear sequel. Instead, the filmmaker is attempting to pull off a feat rarely attempted with Hollywood tentpoles: a parallel circumnavigation of the familiar ‘Bourne’ narrative told through the eyes of another agent.

Exclusive: 'Looper' Director Rian Johnson On Transforming Joseph Gordon-Levitt & The Hour Of Deleted Scenes On The DVD

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 16, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
It's an interesting time for fans of science-fiction out there. While many of the biggest movies in the genre have tinges of sci-fi, they're mostly action-adventures in disguise, with fantastic CGI embellishments. But we've also had a string of lower-budget fare in the last few years that have embraced the more idea-led aspects of the genre -- think Duncan Jones' "Moon," Gareth Edwards' "Monsters," or Neill Blomkamp's "District 9." And the latest to join them is a man who's already made something of a specialty out of deconstructing genre tropes with his teen-noir "Brick" and meta-caper "The Brothers Bloom" -- director Rian Johnson.

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