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Exclusive: Tony Gilroy Pulls The Curtain Back On The Secretive 'The Bourne Legacy'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 20, 2012 12:08 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Tony Gilroy has a mini-armada at his disposal. In June of 2012, in an unassuming block of offices in midtown Manhattan, the writer/director is sequestered with a team of editors orchestrating the next installment of Universal’s lucrative ‘Bourne’ franchise, which grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwide theatrically and a surfeit more from DVD and omnipresent cable appearances. But Gilroy -- who was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay in 2007 for "Michael Clayton," and is the author of all three original ‘Bourne’ scripts -- isn’t simply mounting a reboot or a reimagining, or conducting a linear sequel. Instead, the filmmaker is attempting to pull off a feat rarely attempted with Hollywood tentpoles: a parallel circumnavigation of the familiar ‘Bourne’ narrative told through the eyes of another agent.

Exclusive: 'Looper' Director Rian Johnson On Transforming Joseph Gordon-Levitt & The Hour Of Deleted Scenes On The DVD

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 16, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
It's an interesting time for fans of science-fiction out there. While many of the biggest movies in the genre have tinges of sci-fi, they're mostly action-adventures in disguise, with fantastic CGI embellishments. But we've also had a string of lower-budget fare in the last few years that have embraced the more idea-led aspects of the genre -- think Duncan Jones' "Moon," Gareth Edwards' "Monsters," or Neill Blomkamp's "District 9." And the latest to join them is a man who's already made something of a specialty out of deconstructing genre tropes with his teen-noir "Brick" and meta-caper "The Brothers Bloom" -- director Rian Johnson.

Mark Cousins On ‘What Is This Film Called Love,’ PJ Harvey, 'Prometheus' & “The Sadness Of Time Passing”

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 14, 2012 12:33 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Having seen and loved Mark Cousins’ almost unreviewably subjective “What Is This Film Called Love” on its international premiere at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival last week (read about that experience here), we got to sit down with Cousins in person pretty much immediately afterwards. And it felt rather like walking straight back into the film we had just left: ‘What Is This Film’ is so unapologetically personal that it’s difficult to escape the feeling that, like him or not, you kind of know Cousins by the end of it.

Exclusive: Rian Johnson Says 'Looper' Stopped Him From Directing On 'Game Of Thrones,' Hopes It Might Still Happen One Day

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 14, 2012 11:20 AM
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  • 1 Comment
In between being one of the more exciting young directors we have at the moment, Rian Johnson has been keeping his helming muscles sharp by working on some of the more acclaimed TV series of the last few years. In the four years between "The Brothers Bloom" and the upcoming "Looper," Johnson helmed a divisive third-season episode of "Breaking Bad" entitled "Fly" (one of this writer's favorites on the show), as well as a cracking installment of the short-lived and much-missed "Terriers."

Exclusive: Neill Blomkamp Says Sci-Fi Comedy 'Chappie' Is "Probably" Next, Has No Immediate Plans For 'District 9' Sequel

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • July 13, 2012 9:09 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Neill Blomkamp made one of the more most impressive directorial debuts in recent memory back in 2009 when "District 9" hit theaters; a firmly original, tonally dextrous science-fiction actioner that proved to be a serious sleeper hit, and caused many to compare him to the likes of James Cameron, or indeed his executive producer Peter Jackson.

'The Imposter' Director Bart Layton Talks The Stranger Than Fiction Story & Its Subjective Nature

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • July 13, 2012 11:59 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The Barclay family suffered a devastating blow in 1994 when 13-year-old Nicholas disappeared without a trace. However, 1997 brought a sign of hope -- the young boy had been found in Spain. Seemingly damaged due to sexual abuse by his captors, he was ready to come home. The only problem? It wasn't Nicholas at all -- Frenchman Frédéric Bourdin adopted his identity, fooling authorities and the Barclay clan themselves into thinking that he was the real deal. As you might imagine, it wasn't long before someone started to doubt this ruse (detective Charlie Parker, oddly enough, noticed the ears of Bourdin and Nicholas didn't match up), but the exposed identity only makes the situation uglier, ferreting some nasty theories concerning the whereabouts of the real Nicholas Barclay.

Exclusive: Joel Kinnaman Says 'Robocop' Will Be Serious & Gritty But Also Contain A Satirical Edge

  • By Jen Vineyard
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  • July 12, 2012 10:03 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Joel Kinnaman can shoot you from 135 yards now -- and possibly more on a good day. Not that he would use his newfound skills for that purpose, but the actor has been training with handguns for the "RoboCop" reboot, which requires a lot more action skills and gunplay than his role as a Seattle cop on "The Killing" ever did. "We can put some action hero shit in there for Holder now!" he laughed with glee about his new skills.

Kenneth Lonergan On The Inspirations, Performances, Resonances & Structure Of 'Margaret'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 11, 2012 11:56 AM
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  • 3 Comments
“There are some characters you think of and they’re really vivid to you and they’re easy to write and it doesn’t really matter who or what they are." replies Lonergan. "I don’t know why whatever this is fed itself into the life of a teenage girl. But I had been very interested in teenagers and that combination of sensitivity and dramatisation that they have. And very, very strong reactions to things that adults are more accustomed to, and not necessarily in a good way. They somewhat enjoy the drama which adults also don’t do because we understand it’s all very serious and nothing to enjoy.

Kenneth Lonergan Discusses The Changes In The New Cut Of 'Margaret,' Digital Vs. Film, 3D & More

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 10, 2012 11:04 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Of the many interpretations of the story of its tortuous, years-long journey to the screen, for a time the favored narrative for "Margaret" ran something like this: overambitious director of indie-darling first feature, dashes sprawling, pretentious sophomore effort on rocks of own hubris -- chaos, bitterness, lawsuits ensue. It’s the kind of Hollywood story that writes itself, based around some putative generalised notion of The Director as a towering Wellesian figure of limitless ego and myopia-verging-on-madness where his creations are concerned.

Sarah Polley Talks The Complicated Characters Of 'Take This Waltz,' Magical Creatures & Memories Of "Video Killed The Radio Star"

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • July 9, 2012 11:56 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Canadian filmmaker Sarah Polley’s sophomore directorial effort, “Take This Waltz” has captivated the Playlist staff-- whether we love it or find it frustrating, it's a unique film that stirs many reactions and it's that quality, in addition to some stunning cinematography and great performances that landed it on our Best Films of 2012... So Far list. It's a complicated piece that explores the consequences that come from the choices a person makes in life, and it’s a film that sticks with you in its humanistic realism and beauty. Polley has become a formidable filmmaker since breaking out as an actress, and her debut feature “Away From Her” garnered universal acclaim for its portrayal of losing love in the twilight of life. “Take This Waltz” transplants similar issues to the heady, hotheaded world of 20-somethings, and features bravura performances from the always great Michelle Williams, Seth Rogen and Sarah Silverman.

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