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The Playlist

BAMCinemaFest: Ry Russo-Young Talks Creating Complex Characters & Collaborating With Lena Dunham For 'Nobody Walks'

  • By Cory Everett
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  • June 21, 2012 12:07 PM
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  • 1 Comment
With BAMcinemaFest kicking off this week, New Yorkers who didn’t get the chance to attend Sundance, Cannes or SXSW this year will have a opportunity to sample the best of both fests alongside other cinematic special events. The lineup includes festival favorites “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” “Compliance,” and “Nobody Walks" among many more (check out the full lineup here). And while the latter hasn’t generated quite as much buzz as some of the other entries just yet, we called it “a sensual, emotionally complex film” and “one of the best at [Sundance.]” The third feature from writer/director Ry Russo-Young centers on a young New York artist who comes to stay with a Los Angeles family while she completes her short film and ends up affecting the lives of each family member.

Tim Burton & Timur Bekmambetov Talk The "Superhero Origin Story" Of 'Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter' & Why They Went 3D

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • June 20, 2012 3:19 PM
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  • 1 Comment
When Seth Grahame-Smith began to write the “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,” he didn’t let the epiphany of a wacky title affect his dead-serious alternate universe story -- our 16th President, leader of the people by day, and slayer of the undead at night. Though he couldn’t have expected that the premise to catch the fancy of A-List filmmaker Tim Burton, who heard the title and experienced a brief flashback.

Timur Bekmambetov Says "Shocking" Sequel To 'Wanted' Will Follow James McAvoy's Wesley Gibson & Features A "Great Twist"

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • June 18, 2012 9:40 AM
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  • 7 Comments
EXCLUSIVE: While there has been much talk, a sequel to "Wanted" has been moving slowly. While the original writers were hired to pen a sequel last fall, it remained to seen how they would continue from the blood-soaked finale of the first film, a breakneck comic book actioner from director Timur Bekmambetov that grossed $341 million worldwide. With an ending featuring a bloodbath that killed the most important characters, not to mention the biggest names in the cast, a follow-up looked like a tricky proposition, but it looks like that particular story nut has been cracked.

'Paul Williams: Still Alive' Star Paul Williams & Director Stephen Kessler Discuss Deleted Scenes, Buddy Movies, Muppets & Daft Punk

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • June 8, 2012 1:59 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Singer/songwriter Paul Williams, as Stephen Kessler’s brilliant (and occasionally heartbreaking) new documentary “Paul Williams: Still Alive” teaches us, is indeed, still very much alive. The versatile entertainer has had a profound impact on popular culture, writing songs for The Carpenters (“We’ve Only Just Begun,” as the documentary points out, originated from a television jingle), Helen Reddy, and Elvis Presley. Williams made nearly constant appearances on 1970s television, not only as a performer and guest on countless talk shows but also in episodic dramas like “Hawaii Five-O” and “The Love Boat.” He wrote “Rainbow Connection” for “The Muppet Movie,” won an Oscar for “Evergreen” from the Streisand/Kristofferson “A Star Is Born,” and wrote the songs, score, and co-starred in Brian De Palma’s cult classic “Phantom of the Paradise.” We sat down with Williams and Kessler to discuss making the film, how it became a buddy movie between the two of them, the Muppets, and Williams’ involvement in the new Daft Punk record.

The Playlist Profile: Todd Solondz

  • By Maris James
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  • June 8, 2012 1:00 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Todd Solondz walks through the door of a Cafe on 12th Street in Manhattan, looking, apart from his trademark lemon-yellow converse all stars, like a person in disguise. He wears a floppy khaki sun hat and oversized shades. As he walks through the room, he peels off the sunglasses and replaces them with equally large eyeglasses with thick, retro frames. He yanks off the hat to reveal his hair, which is gray and thinning and bordering on mad scientist. He looks, perhaps, like an oddball character in a Todd Solondz film. The waitress recognizes him and greets him warmly, and he does the same. He's a memorable presence. Appearance aside, he sounds a bit like your Jewish grandmother, his voice comically nasal, his words unhurried and elongated by a childhood in New Jersey, an accent that 30 years in New York City has failed to undo.

Roman Coppola Discusses ‘A Glimpse Inside The Mind Of Charles Swan III’ & The Casting Of Charlie Sheen

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • June 1, 2012 11:01 AM
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It’s hard to believe it’s been more than a decade since Roman Coppola continued the family legacy with his positively received directorial debut, “CQ.” In the years since, Coppola has focused on producing efforts such as sister Sophia’s “Somewhere” and Wes Anderson’s “Darjeeling Limited,” the latter of which Coppola also co-wrote. Most recently, Coppola co-wrote Anderson’s latest, “Moonrise Kingdom.” The release comes on the heels of the news that Coppola has finally returned to the directors chair for “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III,” which features a stellar ensemble cast including Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman, Patricia Arquette and, the most intriguing choice of all, Charlie Sheen, in the title, and lead, role.

Cannes: Kristen Stewart & Garrett Hedlund Talk Making Walter Salles' 'On The Road'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 29, 2012 10:58 AM
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  • 2 Comments
If any film at Cannes this year faced the most fevered anticipation, it was Walter Salles' "On The Road." Not just because the project had been over thirty years in the making, and was based on a beloved, groundbreaking novel, but also because it features an exciting young cast lead by "Twilight" star Kristen Stewart, "Tron: Legacy" lead Garrett Hedlund and Sam Riley from "Control," with a strong supporting roster including Kirsten Dunst, Amy Adams, Viggo Mortensen, Terrence Howard, and more.

Cannes: Walter Salles Talks The Long Journey To Make 'On The Road'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 27, 2012 1:17 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Given that the source material was once described by Truman Capote with the immortal epithet "That's not writing, that's typing," and is a generally unruly thing to adapt, it's not surprising that it's taken the best part of half-a-century to make a film of Jack Kerouac's beat classic "On The Road." Plans were in the works as early as the publication date in 1957 (Kerouac wanted to co-star in the film with Marlon Brando), and documentarian D.A. Pennebaker came close, but it's Francis Ford Coppola who's been the driving force, developing the project since the release of "Apocalypse Now" in 1979.

Guy Pearce Reveals Details Of Drake Doremus' Next; Says It's About An Inappropriate Teacher/Student Relationship

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 23, 2012 9:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Guy Pearce has been having a pretty damn good year in 2012. The actor's been moving towards stardom since "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert" and "L.A. Confidential" fifteen years ago, and looked to turn into a megastar after "Memento," but when big-budget studio picture "The Time Machine" was a flop, he seemed to shift back into being a character actor, delivering many memorable turns ("The Proposition," "Factory Girl") but mostly resisiting stardom. But in the last few years, he's had a flurry of success: small roles in two Oscar-winners in two years with "The Hurt Locker" and "The King's Speech," a homegrown hit with "Animal Kingdom," and an Emmy for "Mildred Pierce."

Nicole Holofcener, Shari Springer Berman & Lisa Cholodenko Talk Future Projects & Being Female Directors In The Film Industry

  • By Jen Vineyard
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  • May 17, 2012 1:25 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Nicole Holofcener and Shari Springer Berman might make very different kinds of films, but they have at least one thing in common -- they both hate being in front of the camera. "If I wanted to be in front of the camera ..." Springer Berman started as Holofcener finished her thought for her, "you'd be Lena Dunham." "I didn't even want to take photos at my wedding," Springer Berman confessed. "I hate being photographed."

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