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The Playlist

Interview: Jonathan Glazer Burrows 'Under The Skin' With Scarlett Johansson For A Haunting Experience

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 4, 2014 1:20 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Jonathan Glazer, Under The Skin
It has been close to a decade since commercial and music video director-turned-filmmaker Jonathan Glazer released his sophomore feature film, “Birth.” Following his slick and stylish debut, the gangster flick “Sexy Beast,” marked a leap forward stylistically, with longer takes, a bold visual approach and a carefully considered integration of narrative and score. And now with his third film, “Under The Skin” (our review) Glazer has again pushed the language of his filmmaking into bold and truly exciting places. (Indeed, check out our 5 Reasons Why It's One Of The Best Films Of The Year).

Interview: Drake Doremus Talks Improvised Slow Boil Of 'Breathe In' & What's Coming In 'Equals' With Kristen Stewart

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 26, 2014 12:06 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Breathe In Drake Doremus Felicity Jones
At the ripe old age of (almost) 31, writer/director Drake Doremus already has an enviable filmography, including festival favorites “Douchebag” and “Like Crazy,” the latter of which introduced American audiences to the charms of one Felicity Jones. If that’s not enough to give aspiring filmmakers apoplexy, his latest film, “Breathe In”—which premiered at Sundance in 2013—opens this week, and his next feature, “Equals,” is already brewing, starring Kristen Stewart and Nicholas Hoult in a futuristic setting (though Doremus is not quite ready to talk about it yet).

Interview: Alejandro Jodorowsky Reveals How His 'Dune' Inspired 'Alien' & Challenges With Getting Script Published

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 21, 2014 4:22 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Jodorowsky's Dune
Frank Pavich's "Jodorowsky's Dune," opening this week in limited release, is a documentary that, for film freaks at least, is something close to miraculous (read our review). It's a detailed, first-hand account of Chilean-French filmmaker Alejando Jodorowsky's failed attempt to bring Frank Herbert's influential sci-fi novel "Dune" to the big screen (years before David Lynch "succeeded" in making a movie out of the difficult material). At one point Jodorowsky explains that he wanted to create the experience of a psychedelic trip… without the drugs. What could have possibly gone wrong? We got to sit down with Jodorowsky at South by Southwest, and while we mostly talked about his new film "Dance of Reality" (out in May—read our review), we were able to squeeze in a few questions about "Dune."

Interview: Denis Villeneuve Talks Shooting Toronto For 'Enemy,' Dipping Into The Subconscious & His Next Projects

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 20, 2014 12:01 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Enemy, Denis Villeneuve
A cinematic puzzle that dives deep into the realm of the subconscious, Denis Villeneuve's "Enemy" blurs reality with absurdity, surreality and sometimes, straight up WTF excursions into the strange. But his film is not coy provocation, nor does it simply circumvent traditional narrative routes as a parlor trick. Instead, across 90 tight, captivating minutes, Villeneuve takes viewers into a crumbling relationship, and the portrait of a man torn between two women, weighing responsibility against desire.

Interview: Kate Lyn Sheil & John Gallagher Jr., Navigate Tech-Dating & Obsession In 'The Heart Machine'

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 13, 2014 4:46 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Part of the pleasure of attending an established film festival like South By Southwest is the caliber of emerging talent it attracts: when you’re seeing a new director’s feature debut, you can rest (reasonably) assured that the cream of the submissions pile has risen to the top. Such is the case with Zachary Wigon’s first film, “The Heart Machine.” Starring John Gallagher, Jr. (“The Newsroom” and last year’s SXSW breakout, “Short Term 12”) and Kate Lyn Sheil (an indie darling who recently appeared in season two of “House of Cards”), the film explores the technological implications of the current dating climate, where sex-with-no-strings is available at the touch of an app, yet intimacy can be kept safely at bay via one’s computer screen.

Interview: Director Lenny Abrahamson on Michael Fassbender’s Giant Head, Faking SXSW in 'Frank' & More

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 12, 2014 4:05 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Frank, Fassbender
Obscuring the terrifically expressive and sometimes terrifying (“12 Years a Slave”) face of actor Michael Fassbender may seem like sacrilege, but that’s just what director Lenny Abrahamson (“What Richard Did”) does in “Frank,” a film that premiered atSundance but is—appropriately, for reasons that will be explained—also playing this week at South By Southwest. Screenwriters Jon Ronson (“The Men Who Stare at Goats”) and Peter Straughan (“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”) have expanded on a memoir by Ronson to create a wholly unique, comi-tragic portrait of one band’s evolution.

Interview: Robert Duvall’s Still Got It In “A Night In Old Mexico”

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 11, 2014 5:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A Night In Old Mexico
It’s no surprise that Robert Duvall is a cantankerous (and charming) old coot in his new film, “A Night in Old Mexico,” helmed by the Spanish director and composer Emilio Aragón. The 83-year-old is still in fine and feisty form as Red Bovie, an old cowboy forced off his land by developers turning the area into sad excuses for “ranchettes.” Rather than live out his days in a trailer home, Red takes off for a Mexican border town with Gally (Jeremy Irvine, “War Horse”), the cowboy-wannabe grandson he has only just met due to a 40-year estrangement with his only son.

Interview: Jake Gyllenhaal Talks The Duality Of 'Enemy' And Why He Wants You To Be Confused

  • By Alex Suskind
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  • March 11, 2014 4:03 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Enemy
At its most basic, “Enemy” is about a man having an affair. Then again, nothing about “Enemy” should be described as “basic.” Denis Villeneuve’s film, which premiered last September at the Toronto Film Festival, is a psychological thriller, a psychosexual dream, an exploration in duality, and an arachnophobic’s worst nightmare (that last one will make more sense once you actually see the movie). It’s about a man, Adam Bell (Gyllenhaal), who discovers he has a doppelganger living on the other side of town. Is it the same person? Is it his long lost twin? Is it a figment of his imagination? It all sounds a bit perplexing, but these are the questions the movie forces you to answer.

Interview: Wes Anderson On 'The Grand Budapest Hotel,' Elliott Smith, The Beatles, Owen Wilson, Westerns & More

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • March 5, 2014 2:32 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson
“His world had vanished long before he entered it. But he sustained the illusion with a marvelous grace." For all its idiosyncrasies, screwball-like speed, exquisite attention to detail, style and craft and some hilariously vulgar humor, “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Wes Anderson’s eighth feature-length film, might be one of his most soulful in some time. That aforementioned quote might be the heart and soul of the movie too; a beautiful and melancholy adage about a refined character who refused to behave without elegance despite the barbaric age that society was devolving into.

Zoe Kazan Talks Twin Roles Of 'The Pretty One' & How 'In Your Eyes' Is "Like Joss Whedon Does Nicholas Sparks"

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • February 21, 2014 2:07 PM
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  • 1 Comment
After winning the Best Actress Award at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival for Bradley Rust Gray’s “The Exploding Girl,” Zoe Kazan added a big-budget rom-com (“It’s Complicated”) and more indie dramas (“Meek’s Cutoff”) to her resume, starred on Broadway (“A Behanding in Spokane”) with Christopher Walken, and wrote the charming (and underrated) screenplay for “Ruby Sparks,” in which she starred with her longtime partner Paul Dano.

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