Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
How Quentin Tarantino & Robert Rodriguez Made Josh Brolin's 'No Country For Old Men' Audition Tape How Quentin Tarantino & Robert Rodriguez Made Josh Brolin's 'No Country For Old Men' Audition Tape 'MacGyver' Movie Reboot And New TV Series Pilot On The Way 'MacGyver' Movie Reboot And New TV Series Pilot On The Way Josh Brolin Says He's Starring With Jessica Chastain In A Movie About George Jones & Tammy Wynette Josh Brolin Says He's Starring With Jessica Chastain In A Movie About George Jones & Tammy Wynette Watch: Robert Richardson Explains Why He Took His Name Off 'World War Z' And More In 58-Minute Cinematographer Talk Watch: Robert Richardson Explains Why He Took His Name Off 'World War Z' And More In 58-Minute Cinematographer Talk George Miller Says He Originally Wanted The Music In 'Mad Max: Fury Road' To Only Come From The Doof Warrior George Miller Says He Originally Wanted The Music In 'Mad Max: Fury Road' To Only Come From The Doof Warrior Stephen King Says Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining' Is "Like A Big, Beautiful Cadillac With No Engine Inside It" Stephen King Says Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining' Is "Like A Big, Beautiful Cadillac With No Engine Inside It" Review: Coen Brothers' 'Hail, Caesar!' Starring Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, And More Review: Coen Brothers' 'Hail, Caesar!' Starring Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, And More Naomi Watts Confirmed For David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Revival; Tom Sizemore Joins Cast Naomi Watts Confirmed For David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Revival; Tom Sizemore Joins Cast Watch: Quentin Tarantino Talks 5 Movies To Watch Before 'The Hateful Eight' In 7-Minute Video Watch: Quentin Tarantino Talks 5 Movies To Watch Before 'The Hateful Eight' In 7-Minute Video SAG Award Winners: ‘Spotlight’ Wins Best Ensemble, Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba & Brie Larson Also Score Big SAG Award Winners: ‘Spotlight’ Wins Best Ensemble, Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba & Brie Larson Also Score Big Review: ‘Jane Got A Gun’ Starring Natalie Portman, Joel Edgerton & Ewan McGregor Review: ‘Jane Got A Gun’ Starring Natalie Portman, Joel Edgerton & Ewan McGregor The 25 Most Anticipated New TV Shows Of 2016 The 25 Most Anticipated New TV Shows Of 2016 The 20 Best Documentaries Of 2015 The 20 Best Documentaries Of 2015 The 20 Best Films Of 2015 The 20 Best Films Of 2015 The 25 Best Action Movies Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Action Movies Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Sci-Fi Films Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Sci-Fi Films Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Animated Films Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Animated Films Of The 21st Century So Far The 50 Best Films Of The Decade So Far The 50 Best Films Of The Decade So Far The 25 Best Horror Films Of The 21st Century So Far The 25 Best Horror Films Of The 21st Century So Far Terry Gilliam Talks The "Simplistic" Films Of Steven Spielberg, Dumbing Down Of Audiences, 'Don Quixote' Start Date & More Terry Gilliam Talks The "Simplistic" Films Of Steven Spielberg, Dumbing Down Of Audiences, 'Don Quixote' Start Date & More

Greg Kinnear As Jason Bateman? We Almost Got A Meta-Meta ‘Arrested Development’ Movie & 8 Things Learned About The New Netflix Season

The Playlist By Edward Davis | The Playlist April 29, 2013 at 5:35PM

Seven years in the making, and honestly not something many realistic pragmatists like us thought would ever come to pass, “Arrested Development” is returning in May on Netflix with all the 15 episodes at once, so you can binge through them all in one sitting, as is the norm for big TV digestion these days. No, it’s not quite a fourth season, or at least says Jason Bateman, but it’s the continuation of the Bluth’s story some 10 years later. Entertainment Weekly’s cover story last week has an awesome breakdown of the “Arrested Development” return and how unflappable series creator Mitch Hurwitz willed it into existence with unwavering tenacity.
1
arrested development, ew

Seven years in the making, and honestly not something many realistic pragmatists like us thought would ever come to pass, “Arrested Development” is returning in May on Netflix with all the 15 episodes at once, so you can binge through them all in one sitting, as is the norm for big TV digestion these days. No, it’s not quite a fourth season, or at least says Jason Bateman, but it’s the continuation of the Bluth’s story some 10 years later. Entertainment Weekly’s cover story last week has an awesome breakdown of the “Arrested Development” return and how unflappable series creator Mitch Hurwitz willed it into existence with unwavering tenacity.

Designed as a prequel to a movie that doesn’t yet exist or have a green light (more on that in a bit), “Arrested Development” premieres on Netflix, May 26th. Here’s 7 things we learned from the EW article that you can use as a primer.

1. Mitch Hurtwitz says the series aspires to be like “The Godfather Part II.” Meaning what? Expect something slightly different.
“If the first series aspired to be ‘The Godfather’ in terms of family, this thing aspires to be ‘The Godfather Part II,” Hurwitz explained. How is this different? Hurwitz says, “I’m sure a lot of people went to see [the sequel] and said, ‘What happened to the machine guns? What are we doing in Cuba? Meetings? Who cares about meetings.’ But [Part II] was more substantial, rewatchable [and] complex. I aspire to do that kind of evolution with this.” Hurwitz makes it clear he’s not trying to compare this new season to “The Godfather” or its sequel, but adds that it’s, “not exactly what the audience expects, but I think it’ll scratch the itch.”

2. So what is it exactly? Well, apparently very complex and ambitious.
In the past, "Arrested Development" was directed by folks like Paul Feig, Joe Russo (one half of the Russo brothers and the director of the next "Captain America" movie), Greg Mottola and Jay Chandrasekhar. This season will be completely co-directed by Troy Miller, also a former “Arrested Development” series helmer and director of “Mr. Show,” along with Hurwitz.

“There’s never been a half-hour comedy with the level of complexity here,” Troy Miller said. “The idea of how characters interrelate and the episodic arcs in A, B, C, D, and E story lines — it’s this crazy wormhole [Mitch has] created.” David Cross described the writer’s room as psycho killer’s apartment where he has everything mapped out on a wall. “Post-it notes and index cards all across the three walls in this big conference room. Yarn stretching from one thing to another and pinned in one place, and then a sharp angular uptick to the Lucille character and down. And then there’s a different-colored yarn that intersects and weaves in. It took [Mitch] 25 minutes to explain what I was looking at, and I still didn’t get everything. When you see that, of course it has to be a TV show. There’s no way else to do this.”

Arrested Development Tony Hale
3. The show will be broken down into character episodes that overlap with other knotty and interwoven Bluth family stories.
Here’s how it will work: Each of the 15 episodes will center around one of nine family members (six episodes being two-parters). Michael Bluth (Jason Bateman) will largely be the only constant throughout each episode, to anchor it for the audience, and the entire family will only appear in one episode together -- part of this was done simply because scheduling would be too busy, so Hurwitz and his writers wrote around the dilemma in advance.

There will also be a Rashōmon effect: certain events are revisited in multiple episodes from different perspectives. “When Mitch started to get his arms around how all the action could happen simultaneously and there was an ability to stop one episode, start another, and have all this crossover and braided plotting,” Jason Bateman said, “it became clear that he was going to try to accomplish something incredibly ambitious, the kind of escalation that the audience would expect from him.”

4. Michael Cera performed double duty and is also one of the writers on the series.
Perhaps because he was one of the most vocal about not returning to the show, or at least the one that expressed as much concern as David Cross about potentially ruining the show’s legacy, Hurwitz sought out Cera, took him out to dinner and wooed him. In the process he asked him to be part of the writing staff to ensure quality control. Cera called the offer to write, “intimidating [and] really moving.”

“There were, at one point, three pieces of different-colored yarn that all led to a card that had a question mark on it,” Cera laughed. “I think everyone — including Mitch and Richie [Rosenstock] and Jim [Vallely], these incredible minds that were navigating this whole thing — felt confused many times. But it helped the process, which was reassuring for me and for some of the newer writers who felt way in over their heads. It comes with the territory of doing a really ambitious story like that.”

This article is related to: Arrested Development, Mitch Hurwitz, Michael Cera, Jason Bateman, David Cross, NetFlix


The Playlist

The obsessives' guide to contemporary cinema via film discussion, news, reviews, features, nostalgia, movie music, soundtracks, DVDs and more.


E-Mail Updates