The 16 Best And Worst TV Series Finales

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by The Playlist Staff
October 1, 2013 2:49 PM
77 Comments
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The world is still debating the relative merits and detractions of the final episode of Vince Gilligan's meth-world saga "Breaking Bad," with some quarters feeling that the finale was a little too cleanly told while others were filled with the sense of contentment from knowing that the final hour was a satisfying conclusion to a five-season arc that turned a meek chemistry teacher (Bryan Cranston) into a ruthless criminal kingpin. There are few, probably, who would take the stance that the last hour of "Breaking Bad" was one of the best series finales ever (or one of the worst). It simply was what it was. An efficiently told, occasionally silly hour of television that tied up a number of loose ends (maybe too many), while still leaving room for small areas of speculation and mystery. But as divisive as the episode might have been, it is nothing compared to the series finales of yore.

In many ways, series finales are like breakups, or maybe deaths, since you have usually been with a show for many years. In that time, you grow to have a relationship with that show, overlook some of its flaws, make excuses for its shortcomings (it was going through a rough patch in season 3!) and look forward to it week after week, even if you know it's bad for you. For most of us, the time we spent, say, puzzling over "Lost" far eclipses the amount of work we've ever put into an actual relationship. Which speaks volumes. But still. 

All good things must come to an end and even if we are living through the "second golden age of television," these series will too have to come to a close at some point, with a number of high-profile shows (among them: "True Blood" and "Mad Men") coming to a hopefully fruitful conclusion in the next couple of years. Parting is such sweet sorrow, especially if it's a show on cable. Below, you can find the finales that left us satisfied and the ones that let us down.

The Best Finales

"The Wire" ("-30-," original airdate: March 9, 2008)
Despite the widespread acknowledgement that it came at the end of weakest of the show's five seasons, "The Wire" finale still earns its stripes for how it gracefully rounded off the epic Baltimore procedural that even now remains an unassailable touchpoint for many of us here. After all, even Peter Griffin's hypnotically induced mantra ” ‘Breaking Bad’ is the best TV show I’ve ever seen,” has to be qualified with “except maybe ‘The Wire.' ” Of course a great series doesn’t necessarily mean a great finale—in fact, where a film derives a lot of its shape and its purpose from the fact that it ends, a TV show is kind of defined by having to carry on; one of the obvious reasons why so many finales disappoint the loyal fan base is that they feel artificial to the format. But "The Wire," which had time called on it by its creator David Simon (who’s become somewhat crotchety at all the adulation after the fact), performed its dismount well because quite aside from the practical business of tying up the season’s plot points, it revisited everything that had made the show what it was and never fell into the trap of trying to dazzle us with last-minute pyrotechnics. Instead in the feature-length final episode we got an intelligent, understated ending, one that played to the great strength of episodic TV and to the great, great strength of this particular show: the sense that the situations and characters were real and alive outside those 60-minute glimpses that we all devoured so avidly. In fact, we’d go so far as to say that after a less-than-convincing fifth season (boo to McNulty’s fake serial killer, among other issues), the finale in many ways gave us our show back. A great deal of that happened during the elegiac grace note montage, as McNulty (Dominic West) looks out over Baltimore, that touches briefly on so many of those unforgettably real characters, some of whom we hadn’t seen for seasons (even the dockland mafiosi from the almost self-contained Season 2 get their moment). In some cases they’re seen in a moment of change or achievement, but mostly it’s just a sliver of their lives, lives that we can somehow believe go on, through more ups and downs and bits in between, even though we’re not watching them anymore.  Anyway, we see enough to know what probably happens next: the new generation will play out a lot like the last one, because the more the game done changed, the more the game done stayed the same.

"Six Feet Under" ("Everyone's Waiting," original airdate: August 21, 2005)
Sure, there are all sorts of things that happen in the last episode of "Six Feet Under," written and directed by series creator Alan Ball, including tons of great ghost Nate moments (which are always good), but what the final episode of the series will forever be remembered for are its last few moments. As Claire finally leaves the funeral home (and the family), she starts to cry, and we do too: moments begin to flash by as she's driving away, first of the events and milestones that are coming up, some of which she will miss (Brenda and Nate's baby's first birthday, her gay brother David's wedding) and then, the stab-you-in-the-heart kicker that's only befitting a shot called "Six Feet Under"—every… character's… death. The deaths are varied (one character drops dead on a cruise ship, another is shot in an armed robbery), but always end with the show's signature fade to white (and the character's name and birth and death date). It's absolutely devastating (the Sia song doesn't exactly help matters), punctuated, at the very end, by Claire's own death, a fitting juxtaposition as she embarks on really starting her life. As the final moments for a show obsessed with death, it's utterly perfect, and as a comment on the nature of series finales, it's even better: there is no door left unopened, no possibility for spin-offs or movie adaptations. You saw how everyone, and not just the series itself, ended, in a spectacularly sad way. This was the ultimate bit of Alan Ball audacity, one that turned out to be a stunning ode to mortality and all of the experiences we collect in our long journey towards the grave; if you weren't openly weeping, then you probably weren't watching.

"Angel" ("Not Fade Away," original airdate: May 19, 2004)
The entire final season of Joss Whedon’s brilliant, deeply underrated “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” spin-off “Angel” felt like it was running on borrowed time, even with a fresh transfusion of creative genius. With its sister show cancelled the previous year, “Angel” got some of that show’s cast members and best writers and used the opportunity to drastically reinvent itself; instead of a kind of supernatural detective series, it became a whacked-out lawyer show, like “L.A. Law” meets “Tales from the Crypt.” And the results were nothing short of brilliant. For its finale, the series, which never had the kind of budget or scope of 'Buffy,' instead focused inward on character, and the result, while lacking the bombast of the 'Buffy' finale, felt infinitely more satisfying. Soulful vampire Angel (David Boreanaz), finally fed up with the deal with the devil he made (with a law firm ominously named Wolfram & Hart), decides to break his contract and take down the company, once and for all. This involve lots and lots of hellish monsters breaking loose, and all sorts of painful double crosses (one, involving lovable demon Lorne, played by the dearly departed Andy Hallett, is one of the most simple, emotionally devastating reversals in the long, sad history of Whedon-orchestrated emotionally devastating reversals). Some of our heroes (including Wesley, played by Alexis Denisof) didn't make it to the end, and those that did were compromised but ultimately fighting the good fight. That was the message of "Angel" overall: never stop fighting. Or, in the words of Angel, during what can only be described as a cliffhanger both frustrating and triumphant, "Personally, I kinda want to slay the dragon."

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77 Comments

  • Resigned Sidekick | April 13, 2014 1:28 AMReply

    " Jack (Matthew Fox) discovers the truth about what is going on with the characters in this universe, there was a decided lack of dramatic tension and any real thrills. Adding insult to injury was the episode's two-and-a-half-hour airtime (the final episode runs over 100 minutes) and the fact that the ending most predicted for the series in the first season (They're all dead!) was actually a component for the finale.:"

    This further proves that one shouldn't comment on something they don't understand. No, they all didn't DIE in the crash. That was just misinterpretation that many people til this day still believe. Even though that idea has already been debunked several times.

    "Instead of coincidence and fate, the show became about two warring white guys, and much of the mystery was replaced by flimsy plotting and awkward pacing, culminating in this final season, which seemed even more directionless than usual. "

    So the fact that they actually gave an answer to some biggest questions on the show made it more directionless? That makes little sense. The theme of coincidence and fate can only go so far until it becomes tedious. People have to make up their minds is their problem with Lost is answer too much or not enough?

    "It's one of the more disappointing finales, series or otherwise, that Whedon has been responsible for; thankfully this was partially rectified by the brilliant "Season 8" comic book that followed. "

    Other than your assessment on Season Eight (which I agree was great). You couldn't be more wrong about this finale. It was about Buffy redefining the mythology that only one girl in all the world could be a slayer.

  • Resigned Sidekick | April 12, 2014 8:55 PMReply

    " Jack (Matthew Fox) discovers the truth about what is going on with the characters in this universe, there was a decided lack of dramatic tension and any real thrills. Adding insult to injury was the episode's two-and-a-half-hour airtime (the final episode runs over 100 minutes) and the fact that the ending most predicted for the series in the first season (They're all dead!) was actually a component for the finale.:"

    This further proves that one shouldn't comment on something they don't understand. No, they all didn't DIE in the crash. That was just misinterpretation that many people til this day still believe. Even though that idea has already been dunked several times.

    "Instead of coincidence and fate, the show became about two warring white guys, and much of the mystery was replaced by flimsy plotting and awkward pacing, culminating in this final season, which seemed even more directionless than usual. "

    So the fact that they actually gave an answer to some biggest questions on the show made it more directionless? That makes little sense. The theme of coincidence and fate can only go so far until it becomes tedious. People have to make up their minds is their problem with Lost is answer too much or not enough?

    "It's one of the more disappointing finales, series or otherwise, that Whedon has been responsible for; thankfully this was partially rectified by the brilliant "Season 8" comic book that followed. "

    Other than your assessment on Season Eight (which I agree was great). You couldn't be more wrong about this finale. It was about Buffy redefining the mythology that only one girl in all the world could be a slayer.

  • Maz | April 2, 2014 4:17 PMReply

    What about The Closer ??!! It was a great show maybe one of the best police phorensic shows in recent years and wrapped up quite nicely !

  • Scott | April 1, 2014 9:40 AMReply

    Really, no M*A*S*H*?

  • Rob | March 23, 2014 12:50 PMReply

    I must have missed something about "The Shield" finale. I didn't get that he was in a cubicle years later. I've watched whole series plus finale twice. Finale was immediately following the events from what I saw. Explain how I'm wrong if I am.

  • Donovan | March 23, 2014 10:14 AMReply

    of of the best endings to a series ever had to have been one of the least-watched ...

    The Mortal Kombat tv series ending was AMAZING. Say what you will about the show overall (had a cult following), but the ending was absolutely PERFECT. You couldn't get any better.

  • Topster | February 13, 2014 9:33 AMReply

    "Worst" list is debatable. Although I don't see why this writer didn't just stop at best list. There are in fact worst finales than what was on the list, like those of shows we didn't really care about or of ones that got canceled before they get a chance to conclude the story. The title should have been best and debatable/least favorite finales according to list compiler.

  • charlie | February 11, 2014 8:46 PMReply

    i hate people who actually believe that " they were all dead " refers to the finale of lost!! i mean how narrow-minded does one have to be, it is made so abundantly clear in the end that what happened on the island happened. Jack, just before the final church scene is told by his dad that they " are all dead" referring to how in the end everyone died, as one does, in both the normal life and the afterlife but the people on the island were the most important in making each other realize how to properly live it.

  • Sarah | April 2, 2014 12:01 PM

    Thanks for pointing that out, I was about to write that too!

  • Rosie | January 29, 2014 12:00 PMReply

    You placed the "BUFFY" finale on the "worst" list? The hell with that opinion.

  • Nicole | December 31, 2013 3:36 PMReply

    The Medium finale ruined the entire series for me. The entire show was built on Joe & Allison's relationship. Obliterating that was just terrible. Also, every ghost on the show was stuck at whatever age they died at. Why did Allison's ghost get to be young again? A perk of being a medium? Ugh.

  • Joel | December 30, 2013 7:19 AMReply

    Awful list. They bash Buffy (which I thought was a great show ending, leaving the "silly" behind until the very end, encapulating how the show "grew" with it's fan base over the years, becoming more mature and serious....well, as serious as a show with Buffy, Vampire, and Slayer in the title can be anyway. So he bashes that, but puts LOST and SEINFELD on the list??? Really? The two WORST endings to a series in the history of the world. Simply awful list from someone who seems to have chosen which shows to list by throwing darts.

  • Drew | January 12, 2014 5:53 AM

    Did you not notice that this was a list of best AND worst? Seinfeld and Lost were in the worst category.

  • Jim | December 21, 2013 10:06 AMReply

    Ok, I hate to be this way but everything listed is within the last two decades. Maybe there was a disclaimer that I missed. As if TV series just started with the 30 somethings. Guess what? There were great shows before that. I'm not even that old. For the record, my favorite ending of all time was "Newhart". Simpler times I guess.

  • a p garcia | November 11, 2013 1:40 PMReply

    My nomination for worst TV finale is Stargate. After 10 seasons, "no ending" on broadcast TV! Episodes were leading up to a grand finale, but it was cancelled and stopped production before the end so there was no proper end.

  • tv prime time | November 11, 2013 1:12 PMReply

    i guest walking dead is the best one and shoud be the first horror movie on this year

  • Jake M | November 7, 2013 7:44 PMReply

    I'm sorry but Breaking bad deserves number one mate. No loose ends, ended on time, perfect ending basically. Felt like reading an amazing book or watching a great play, no show has captured me more.

  • Scott j | October 15, 2013 3:07 PMReply

    Sorry, the Lost finale was great. People just went overboard thinking that every single shot on the shot had some deep meaning, which is ridiculous. And please don't try to sum up the show by saying everyone was dead. Everything that happened on the island really happened. It wasn't until the sideways universe in the last season that the characters were in a purgatory-like state.

    There should be no debate about The Sopranos finale. Pay attention to the POV shots throughout, and it is clear that Tony gets killed by the man in the members only jacket.

  • guy | December 18, 2013 9:21 AM

    I thought Lost finale was good, not great, and it is still one of the best shows of all time. They told us why they were on the island, what they had to do, and whether the characters did it or not. It showed what happened to them, some died, some finally managed to escape. Yes, the side-way universe was a little weak, but "The Wire" was also weak in its last season, and that did not diminish the show. I do not understand what more people wanted without a character just answering questions around a campfire, which is telling not showing. They answered like 100 questions and 40 or so are left to the imagination. The answers had to fit into the story and those that did not were unanswered. Also, the snark about two white guy deities was a little unfair, the cast was very diverse. Also, they already joke about the "magic minority" in movies, and if a minority was the evil one, people would have complained even more.

    There is a difference between not liking the answers and complaining about the story. Lost, like Battlestar Galactica, told the story the writers wanted to tell. If you did not like the answers fine, but saying they did not answer the questions is unfair, they did.

  • Trebuchette | October 26, 2013 8:38 PM

    The Lost finale was an incredible cop-out. It showed how bad the producers had LOST their way, but that's about it. Cringeworthy. People who stopped watching in S3 when Jack wanted to "go back" had been right all along — the show could never make sense. And they even missed the really bad stuff (travel back in time, flash-sideways, "make-a-heaven"). It was really that bad.

    But ITA about The Sopranos finale being pretty clear-cut. Also genius, because you can *still* watch the show and come away with something new, or change your mind about what may have happened after Tony was killed. (Sometimes, I'm sure Paulie worked with New York to whack Tony because he was paranoid about becoming capo; other times, a Patrisi hit sounds good.) To this day, the penultimate and that finale sends shivers down my spine.

  • Keith | October 14, 2013 12:27 PMReply

    Never knew there were any questions about the Sopranos ending. Pure class, just like pretty much every episode (other than the extended dream sequences).

  • j jay | October 12, 2013 9:59 AMReply

    if the buffy the vampire slayer finale looked like a deleted scene from lord of the rings that it was obviously the best finale ever

  • Daniel | October 28, 2013 3:38 PM

    Screamy, it wasn't until The Hobbit that the Tolkien world went mostly digital. The LOTR films were shot mostly on location in New Zealand, with most characters altered by camera angle or makeup. Also, CGI doesn't make a film suck.

  • Screamy | October 21, 2013 12:55 PM

    Lord of the Rings sucked. You must live in a state of constant amazement if CGI effects bedazzle your mind so much.

  • m | October 12, 2013 2:18 PM

    HA. So true.

  • - | October 6, 2013 10:58 AMReply

    Of the ones I've seen, I'd say Six Feet Under was the best. I think it's far from the best show, but the finale was so perfect and I don't see any show surpassing it. I would say The Sopranos' is the next best (although obviously that's controversial) followed by The Wire's.
    I haven't seen The Shield.

  • Derek | October 5, 2013 8:56 PMReply

    You missed the mark on the Angel Premise. Angel didn't set up to stop Wolfram & Hart for good, they were extra dimensional, and thus out of his reach. Because he knew he could never stop them for good, they were cut off from the slayers because of joining the firm, and working at the firm was tearing him and his friends apart, he decided that working from within long term would be pointless, and he decided to cripple Wolfram & Hart, temporarily to show people that they weren't invincible.

  • Dan | October 5, 2013 8:10 PMReply

    In The Shield when Vics at the office cubicle thats surely not years later, but like the first night on the job.

  • MBlaize | October 4, 2013 5:50 AMReply

    Disagree with Lost.
    I thought it an extremely beautiful ending.

    Concluded everything
    SPOILER ALERT.
    Though they were in Limbo, and chose to move onto the next life together, it tied up the ending of them moving on from the island together.

    For people, who claim it was "confusing" I agree with you in certain in certain episodes you were "lost." Could that have been the intention of the writers? I believe it was. The ending was not confusing and if you didn't understand you weren't really paying attention.

    Not only was I blown away as a huge Lost fan, but I honestly couldn't have come up with such a great storyline to conclude their journey of being lost. The island brought them together, they tried to leave the island on their terms, the island chose candidated them for someone to take Jacobs place, and the candidate was chosen and they moved on back to reality, and the conclusion of them being woken up in Limbo and brought to the church where they moved on in the afterlife together was so beautifully written. And yes the show ended where it began with Jack lying back down.

    Wonderful show and conclusion.
    This writer is pretty bias about saying it was terrible.
    I know certain people, who were in favor of it, many who didn't use their brain and understand it, and others, who just weren't happy with it.

  • Trebuchette | October 26, 2013 8:43 PM

    No, pretty much everyone hated LOST except fangirls or shippers. Maybe there was a bit of bait-and-switch going on, like letting people believe they were going to watch Monday Night Football, showing a little football for a while, then finishing the football game with a random teenage beauty pageant that has nothing at all to do with football. There will ALWAYS be hatred for LOST on that point, alone: bait-and-switch.

  • MBlaize | October 4, 2013 5:54 AM

    I would also like to add that Battle Star Galactica was a phenomenal ending. Another disagreement in this article.

    The ending summed up the show (which is the rise and fall of civilizations)

    I really don't think you were a fan of Lost or BattleStar. B/c they were both exceptional.

  • Fairportfan | October 3, 2013 7:34 PMReply

    The "Seinfeld" finale should be at the top of the list of great finales: It put that lousy excuse for entertainment out of our misery forever.

  • KG | October 5, 2013 2:09 AM

    boo this man.

  • Viewer | October 3, 2013 6:44 PMReply

    I agree on the ones I've seen, except Buffy and Angel - I'd flip them. Those shows were about character arcs; on Buffy, we were given conclusions for all the main characters, while on Angel, we were not. I'm a little rusty, but with the Buffy finale, Spike makes a true sacrifice, Anya becomes truly human/mortal by dying, Buffy becomes almost a regular girl by being only one of many slayers, etc. With Angel, we don't have that completion, and the show was about redemption one day at a time, but it ends in the middle of a suicidal battle? That was weird and didn't seem true to what had been the message of the show.

  • Monique A Williams | October 3, 2013 3:19 PMReply

    I'm so glad to see both Angel and Buffy on this list. Angel's final season was such a great turnaround, given how awful that 4th season was, and the finale was ultra satisfying. Buffy, possibly my favorite show of all time, had a weak 7th season and didn't have that same feeling. Though I enjoyed what season 6 brought to the show, if it ended at season 5, it would have been on the list for best finales.

  • Randall | October 3, 2013 10:23 AMReply

    Roseanne really needs to be on the list of worst finalés. And as someone else mentioned, Newhart is among the best.

  • Karan | October 3, 2013 7:42 AMReply

    You probably missed the Scrubs Finale... I think it was one of the best finales for a show ever!.. A reason why you might not consider it is because they came back another season with an all new cast & setting. But the original finale was a perfect to an amazing series.

  • Fenil | October 3, 2013 4:42 AMReply

    You cannot be serious about Seinfeld. You might dislike the finale but to put it in the worst finale list is totally bonkers.

  • Monique a williams | October 3, 2013 3:15 PM

    I remember thinking it was crap too. Especially for as amazing a series as Seinfeld.

  • Shame | October 3, 2013 5:44 AM

    "Seinfeld" is a perfect choice here. The finale felt like the creators were saying, "I'm so sick and tired of these characters and this show. I hope you are too." It was a big middle finger to all "Seinfeld"'s fans.

  • AV | October 2, 2013 10:29 PMReply

    Babylon 5 had a very satisfying ending (actually filmed the season before its final year but only aired at the end of that final season). I would love to say my other 90s sci fi series DS9 had as good a final ep but to me it fell short (although I appear to be in the minority on that front).

  • Marcelo | October 8, 2013 8:36 AM

    Babylon 5 had -probably- the best final in scy-fi series and one of the best in tv. Really great! Now, so may years later, i cry when i watch it again. I invited to watch the serie ant specially the final ep.
    Saludos desde Argentina!

  • Dara | October 4, 2013 3:02 AM

    Oh very much this. Just fantastic. Series 5 was... not all it could've been, but that ending episode was just phenomenal.

  • Rita | October 2, 2013 7:52 PMReply

    Don't you watch anything before 1995? What happened to the Newhart finale, one of the best; or the Dick Van Dyke final show; and of course, the last show of Mary Tyler Moore.

  • TOM JORDACHE | October 2, 2013 7:31 PMReply

    Rich Man Poor Man had a poor ending too

    the good guy dies in the gutter with the villain

  • Paul Borawski | October 2, 2013 3:41 PMReply

    Great article! One I have to throw out there for worst was Night Court. I loved that series and it ended soooo bizarre that it's incomprehensible as to how it got made. Bull went to space with Alens?! Dan Filedling became a wuss to follow Christine?! Harry had all of these amazing life choices and he chose to stay in Night Court with Mac?! WTF?!! That episode really hurt to watch.

  • Monique A Williams | October 3, 2013 3:14 PM

    That's why Kenneth wanted a do-over on 30 Rock for Night Court's series finale. It was terrible!!!

  • Rick | October 2, 2013 2:09 PMReply

    Seinfeld was one of the funniest finales of all time. Bringing back all the characters that made us laugh over the years was a perfect way to wrap it up. It didn't need to be deep, just funny. Cheers is Meanwhile, Cheers, M.A.S.H and Newhart are almost universally accepted as all-time great finales.

  • Alex | October 2, 2013 1:41 PMReply

    I have to disagree with your opinion on Alias. I just watched the Alias finale last night and thought it was absolutely wonderful. Sydney had wanted to be out of the spy game since episode 2. She told Vaughn she wanted to take down SD6, and then she would be finished. The problem was she always kept being pulled back in. The fact that she's finally able to relax easily is a great thing for her character. Even if she didn't have kids, I'd imagine she'd be doing the same thing with Vaughn. Is a strong female character supposed to keep up the fight forever just because she represents something positive? How long does a marine have to serve their country before they can finally relax? My only complaint about Sydney is that she still wanted to save her mother. That was her only weak point I thought in the final episode. Also, Jack Bristow and Sloane had fantastic endings, fitting their characters, I think.

    And I love Buffy but I can agree about that though.

  • X | October 2, 2013 12:13 PMReply

    The Spartacus finale was EPIC. It had everything you'd want in a finale, tying up loose ends....some characters having a happy ending, others not so much. After a stellar season one the show struggled to get back on its feet after the talented Andy Whitfield passed away but the Finale really delivered.

  • Pupster | October 2, 2013 9:34 AMReply

    Perhaps it's because I'm an oldster, but the most perfect series finale I can remember is the one for Newhart. Can't imagine a better one.

  • oobug | October 2, 2013 3:02 AMReply

    While I like this list, the worst finale I can think of is that of the 2000s Battlestar Galactica series. After 4 seasons of episode introductions claiming that the Cylons "have a plan," this plan appears to get subverted without ever being revealed. Instead, we get highly dissatisfying emotional... resolutions? ...for the lead characters, which play out as if they were specifically crafted to disappoint optimistic fans.

    Granted, the show was on a steady downhill climb since the midpoint of season 3.

  • guy | December 18, 2013 9:31 AM

    They had a plan, it was the destruction of the colonies in the first episode, and they did it. I do not know what other plan people wanted revealed. I thought the finale was very well done. It called back to the original series, as the premise was our ancestors were "up in the stars", and it turned out (spoilers) they were our ancestors. It was a popular "junk science" theory in the 70's that there were advanced civilizations on Earth before recorded history, like Atlantis, and the original series played up on that. The finale showed what happened to the characters and finally gave them a home and they broke the cycle of destruction. It was a very good finale.

  • serena | October 1, 2013 7:58 PMReply

    The worst series finale in recent memory was THE OFFICE (USA). The most mundane thing any storyteller can do is to give their characters--and their audience--everything they want, finale or not. THE OFFICE began as an awkward comedy about everyday embarrassments, and its big clincher was the Jim/Pam romance, all about withholding romance. So for it to become so saccharine in the last few seasons, and end on a note where literally every single character, even the minor ones like the real estate agent, get what they want, it strikes me as a finale that will not stand the test of time.

  • Alan B | October 2, 2013 4:19 AM

    Not everyone got what they wanted, although they all got what they NEEDED. By the end of last season, Andy got everything he wanted: his nemesis was gone, he got the manager's job back, the usurper was demoted, he brought David Wallace to the company, he had the respect of his workers and he earned back the love of his life, Erin. In the final season, he lost his job, his girlfriend, his status and the affection of the staff. However, in the final episode, he got what he needed, which was self-respect. That arc is important and ignoring it diminishes your little "everyone gets everything" narrative.

  • Sean | October 1, 2013 9:04 PM

    It died when Michael Scott left. I pretend the series when the last shot was Pam was watching Michael fly away (not the awful tag of Will Ferrell and how he snapped mentally)

  • HS | October 1, 2013 5:15 PMReply

    "Why didn't Dawn finally, you know, show us what a Key is all about?"

    She did. In Season Five.

    Taste is subjective, of course: it's more than fine not to like the Lost or Buffy finales (and Whedon fan that I am, the latter did underwhelm me somewhat). That said, your write-ups of them do kind of betray a failure to understand certain aspects of the episodes / shows. Snark is all well and good, but it's worth backing that snark up with something substantial, otherwise it comes across as hollow.

  • HS | October 1, 2013 5:20 PM

    Silly me: the Lost and Buffy entries irritated me enough that I leapt in before I got to the end of the article. Your Alias assessment is pretty duff as well: much of the final season of that show rang false, but the ending was something of a grace note for all the regular characters. If you think that being able to retire with the man she loved was out of character for Sydney Bristow, you probably didn't pay much attention to the character and her motivations over the course of the previous several years.

  • Keil S. | October 1, 2013 5:03 PMReply

    The Shield's finale is the best of all time, though I feel The Wire and The Sopranos are better series overall.

  • Alan B | October 1, 2013 4:34 PMReply

    "Instead of coincidence and fate, the show became about two warring white guys"

    If you can get through that many hours of television and still only see those characters are white, then you are obsessed with race to an extremely unhealthy degree.

  • Rob | October 1, 2013 3:48 PMReply

    I agree with all of these, but there is one giant hole in this article: WHERE THE HELL IS STAR TREK: TNG?!! The last episode of TNG was one of the only shows to end PERFECTLY and you completely disregarded it.

  • Nicole | December 31, 2013 3:42 PM

    AWESOME finale. It still pops in my mind every now and then, like I'm still trying to figure out how all that time-jumping and beginning of life on Earth unmaking worked... Also, Picard joining the crew for poker - *sniff* Absolutely perfect!

  • Eric | October 5, 2013 9:29 PM

    Yes - I was going to post the same comment. It was a perfect finale. But I think there's a certain snobbery and sadly trek doesn't get taken seriously.

  • DrAsimov | October 2, 2013 8:34 AM

    Bless you.

  • o_O | October 1, 2013 8:54 PM

    Totally agree with you!

  • TheoC | October 1, 2013 3:38 PMReply

    I loved Six feet Under but I remember being very disappointed with that final episode. The Sopranos finale is genius but overall the final season was disappointing.

    I just loved all of Enlightened, weirdly it not being renewed is a good enough ending for me.

  • Wesley | October 1, 2013 3:31 PMReply

    @Andrew, I completely agree with about Lost. If you were in it for the mysteries you probably hated it, but on a thematic, emotional and character level the finale was perfect.

  • Mark Johnson | October 1, 2013 3:29 PMReply

    Once again, a group of people who don't "get" what LOST was all about, and bash the perfect ending as a result. Ugh. Tiresome.

  • FehtaCheese | October 13, 2013 5:22 PM

    The LOST finale was fine. It was emotional, action packed and true to the characters. The entire sixth season of LOST was NOT fine. It was a terrible season, with characters trapped inside the temple with people we neither knew nor cared about for weeks, barely advancing the plot, and with other precious series-ending episodes devoted to Jacob/MIB as tweens and their crazy mother. It seemed intent on NOT giving us resolution and that was what was frustrating. The length of "The End" seems to be a huge problem for this writer but I have watched it probably ten times since the show aired and I like it more each time. As a final season, it ended weakly but the final episode was lovely.

  • MBlaize | October 4, 2013 5:57 AM

    Mark, I am totally with you.
    I feel like people just didn't get it.

    It was the most beautiful ending. I don't cry much, but I was in tears in that finale.
    Amazing writing. I have never been that blown away by a show in my life.

  • Sean | October 1, 2013 4:06 PM

    Fans need to stop telling people that their opinions are wrong. LOST, Breaking Bad, Sopranos, whatever you like, just learn to like it yourself (or dislike) but accept that others are different than you and might not have the same view.
    If LOST was a good finale, maybe instead of doing the LOST fanboy tactic of saying "you just didn't get it" and maybe elaborate why.

    I was a huge LOST fan for 4 seasons. I loved season 1 like everyone else, and when people said seasons 2 and 3 where weaker, I didn't agree and still loved it. Then season 4 happened, and the show had a season to rival season 1. Season 5 is where it lost (bad pun) me. Once 6 rolled around, it became tired. It still had good twists and turns, but it got mixed in with the whole having to tell the story but with a twist.
    People say the show was about the characters and not the story. To a degree, yes that's right. But I also exclaim bullshit on that. It was show that sold itself on the mysteries this island had. we watched because we wanted to know what was in the hatch or what that monster was. Season 6 and it's finale did the incorrect thing by still introducing story plots that they had to wrap in a few episodes, along with new characters that they had to get us viewers to love and care for in 13 episodes. That was Lindeloff's mistake: introducing too much in it's final hour (or 13), rather than bringing everything to some nice, warranted closure.

  • Lauren | October 1, 2013 3:26 PMReply

    Anyone who thinks the Sopranos finale was good is an absolte idiot.

    Signed,

    The Universe

  • FehtaCheese | October 13, 2013 5:21 PM

    The LOST finale was fine. It was emotional, action packed and true to the characters. The entire sixth season of LOST was NOT fine. It was a terrible season, with characters trapped inside the temple with people we neither knew nor cared about for weeks, barely advancing the plot, and with other precious series-ending episodes devoted to Jacob/MIB as tweens and their crazy mother. It seemed intent on NOT giving us resolution and that was what was frustrating. The length of "The End" seems to be a huge problem for this writer but I have watched it probably ten times since the show aired and I like it more each time. As a final season, it ended weakly but the final episode was lovely.

  • 0_O | October 1, 2013 7:05 PM

    how dare you speaking for the universe. that ending was genius and i'm form the universe so.

  • lol | October 1, 2013 3:33 PM

    "absolte idiot." Amazing

  • Andrew | October 1, 2013 3:14 PMReply

    For me personally it's hard to imagine that any show will be able to top The Shield's finale. It really is the perfect end to an incredibly great show.

    I personally do really love the Lost finale. I understand that for many the show was about the mysteries, but for me the most interesting aspect of the show was the whole theme 'Science vs. Faith' and the finale I thought really embraced that very concept without definitively choosing a side. On an emotional level, I couldn't imagine anything more satisfying. The final season as a whole certainly wasn't the greatest, but I did really like the finale regardless.

  • Marco | October 1, 2013 8:08 PM

    Well put, Andrew. It got to be a pain to defend the entire series based everyone's anger over the final season, but for those that were invested in more than the mythology, that finale worked on an emotional level. Also, they didn't rewrite the character storylines, it was a bait and switch tha didn't impact the characters original stories at all. It was just - ah to hell with it, I give up.

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