Darren Aronofsky Says 'The Fountain' Was Too Expensive, Talks Connecting 'Noah' With Modern Audiences & More

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by Jessica Kiang
December 11, 2012 11:18 AM
4 Comments
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One of the most predictably oversubscribed events at the Marrakech International Film Festival this year was Darren Aronofsky’s masterclass. Lasting nearly two hours, however, and delivering a retrospective spin through the five feature films that make up his back catalog, as well as a few nuggets about the forthcoming “Noah,” it actually most caught fire when the proceedings were opened up to the audience. In this section, Aronsofky was at his most forthcoming and engaged, happy to share his expertise with the many film students who got questions in, and passionate in his encouragement of young local filmmakers. 

During the course of the evening, he namechecked many filmmakers -- FelliniKurosawaKubrick, Kusturica and Spielberg -- and many films, including “Stop Making Sense” (director Jonathan Demme was in the audience) and more recently, “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” which he described as “one of the most amazing performances and moments of spirit that you’ll ever see in a movie.” Here's a recap of what we learned over the evening.

Aronofsky owes his start in filmmaking to his college roommate.
[At college I was] waiting for that moment when a light would shine on me and tell me what to do. And luckily my roommate was an animator and he would end the year with a movie, and I would end it with a bunch of papers with B minuses on them. So I was terrfied to start studying filmmaking, but he gave me the strength, and then I started to edit, cutting with real film. I was really good at working that machine, so I helped other people with it, and discovering editing and the power of a strong cut is what gave me the energy to make films. 

Aronofsky feels he’s become looser in his filmmaking style from film to film.
I’ve become more and more loose as I’ve progressed. I used to shotlist and storyboard everything. And now [I just do that for] really difficult technical scenes where visual effects are a major part. If it’s just actors and a set I go completely unprepared, put them in the location and try and figure out a moment. It’s less work for me, because I have to do less homework, but it also I think is a better process.

"The Fountain” and ‘Requiem’ are much more formal and I was on sticks a lot, but then “The Wrestler” was very much a verite documentary style, so I started to work with handheld cameras. I think every movie has its own visual language and it’s your job as director to figure out what’s the best language to tell that story. Sometimes there’s economic reasons, but then you try to figure out how to make that part of the language of the film. 

I worked the least in “The Wrestler” than I ever worked, as far as the amount of pain that went in. And I think I even worked a little less on “Black Swan,” so sometimes it’s not how hard you work, it’s just getting into the groove of what’s in front of you. 

His only real regret about “The Fountain” is how much it cost, but he believes its themes are still relevant.
It was the film I wanted to make. Of all my movies, to the people that are fans, it’s almost like a cult religion, they get tattoos and I’m constantly getting long letters from people saying it helped them come to terms with something. So I think it works for a much smaller audience because ultimately the film is about coming to terms with your own death, which is not a big commercial idea for a lot of people. The unfortunate thing about that film is it cost a lot of money to make, but is probably more of an art/experimental film than the budget it warranted. 

The way we treat old people and people who are dying is just…with all our advances in science we’ve just become incredibly cruel with how the end of life is dealt with -- especially in the States, it’s really messed up. And the beginning of life too -- giving birth in America you have to do it in a hospital and there are very few options for natural childbirth. So Western science has taken control of the way we are born and the way we die, and there’s really no spirituality to it any more. [laughs] This is why that was not a commercial movie.

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4 Comments

  • Walter Pitt | December 13, 2012 11:36 PMReply

    Funny, I just watched the Fountain today for the umpteenth time and it made me cry
    and smile and feel my own mortal coil and my immortal soul. It revealed my life and relationships to me and made me think of the inner life of the filmmaker and what he must have been through
    as he conjured the fate of his own future. What ever it cost, I would say it was worth the money
    spent. Thanks Darren for the gift of the Fountain. Finish it.

  • Jair Onofre | December 13, 2012 5:40 PMReply

    La Fuente de la Vida (The Fountain) fue y es una de sus más grandes películas, aun cuando a una buena parte de la gente no les gusto, habemos otros a los cuales nos ha encantado la idea, ¿por qué nadie lleva un tatoo de The Wrestler o de The Black Swan??? ¿ Por qué???? Sencillo, aun cuando fueron éxitos para Darren, lo fue más para nosotros los fans. Así que Darren, guarde silencio y siéntase orgulloso de su magnifica pelicula!

  • Daniel Zelter | December 11, 2012 9:56 PMReply

    "During the course of the evening, he namechecked many filmmakers -- Fellini, Kurosawa, Kubrick, Kusturica and Spielberg --"

    What about Satoshi Kon?

  • sc | December 11, 2012 5:19 PMReply

    The less he talks about The Fountain, the better.

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