Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Martin Freeman Takes William H. Macy Role In FX's 'Fargo' Series

Photo of Kevin Jagernauth By Kevin Jagernauth | The Playlist September 27, 2013 at 9:43AM

Before you say "What they heck d'ya mean?" and stand opposed to this TV version of the Coen Brothers wintry classic "Fargo," you should know that the siblings are actually executive producers of the limited FX series. And if casting continues to draw the names that it has so far, this is one that's going to be high on our DVR list next year.
2
Fargo William H Macy Martin Freeman

Before you say "What the heck d'ya mean?" and stand opposed to this TV version of the Coen Brothers wintry classic "Fargo," you should know that the siblings are actually executive producers of the limited FX series. Still not convinced? Well, if casting continues to draw the names that it has so far, this is one that's going to be high on our DVR list next year.

With Billy Bob Thornton already slated for the Steve Buscemi-esque part, THR reports that "The Hobbit" and "Sherlock" star Martin Freeman is now set to take the plum gig of Lester Nygaard, the beaten down car salesman played by William M. Macy in the original film (named Jerry Lundegaard, obviously, but same idea, different name)—and we have to say, we really dig that choice.

Penned by Noah Hawley ("Bones," "The Unusuals"), who is also an exec producer on the show, exact plot details are being kept under wraps, but it appears to follow the general structure of the movie, with a hapless ordinary man brought into a scheme that goes way over his head. It will present an all new "true crime" story, which of course, is probably not true, but nonetheless the combination of "Minnesota nice" humbleness with grim criminal misdeeds is a potent combination.

Production gets underway next month, with the 10-part series to air next spring, and there will likely be more casting to come as everything gets set to roll.

This article is related to: Television, TV News, Martin Freeman, Fargo


The Playlist

The obsessives' guide to contemporary cinema via film discussion, news, reviews, features, nostalgia, movie music, soundtracks, DVDs and more.


E-Mail Updates