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Not Quite Extinct: Colin Trevorrow And DP John Schwartman Plan To Shoot ‘Jurassic World’ In 35mm & 65mm

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by Charlie Schmidlin
February 7, 2014 9:19 AM
2 Comments
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Colin Trevorrow, Jurassic Park 4

With just the charming time-travel drama “Safety Not Guaranteed” under his feature belt, director Colin Trevorrow initially scanned as a curious choice to helm the new installment of the dormant “Jurassic Park” franchise. Would the massive step up in scale and stakes for “Jurassic World” prove to hit the same atmosphere and excitement of Steven Spielberg’s 1993 original? More than a year stands before we get the final answer, but for now new details have promised he’s aiming for a classic old-school approach.

Many rumors have circled the project regarding its new storyline: dinosaur amusement parks and a return to Isla Nubar are both elements that have cropped up, but the only one confirmed is that the film will take place 22 years after the original. While details around the narrative remain shrouded, we now how Trevorrow plans to shoot it – in two separate film formats.

“Honored to be working with cinematographer John Schwartzman on ‘Jurassic World’, shooting this April on 35mm and 65mm film,” tweeted Trevorrow recently (via Bleeding Cool). Schwartman, a considerable DP known for his work on “Armageddon,” “The Amazing Spider-Man," and most recently “Saving Mr. Banks," definitely knows his way around a big-budget effort; Trevorrow likely selected him for that very reason, especially when it comes to the 3D requirements and grand 65mm sequences in the finished film as it starts production in Hawaii and New Orleans.

With this new information, it’d be a safe bet to assume an IMAX 3D release for “Jurassic World” as it’s released on June 12th, 2015. With a solid cast so far including Chris Pratt, Ty Simpkins, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Nick Robinson, the dinosaur epic is looking more and more of a promising prospect when it does.


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2 Comments

  • Glass | February 8, 2014 9:04 PMReply

    "Schwartman ... definitely knows his way around a big-budget effort; Trevorrow likely selected him for that very reason"

    I'd bet this is a case where the studio decides on a cameraman (tentpole helmed by a sophomore director whose first movie was low-low-budget with mediocre camerawork), not the director.

  • Jeff | February 7, 2014 9:46 AMReply

    JP was released in 1993.

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