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Rome Interview: Larry Clark On 'Marfa Girl,' The Role Of The Writer & How He Became Fearless

The Playlist By Jessica Kiang | The Playlist November 23, 2012 at 9:02AM

In the 17 years and 6 films since his excoriating debut "Kids," Larry Clark has gradually slipped off many radars, as detractors claimed that precisely what had so shocked and impressed in his early work (explicit sex, violence and drug taking amongst photogenic teenagers) was becoming irrelevant at best, and exploitative at worst. But perhaps his latest film, "Marfa Girl," the first in a mooted trilogy, which won the top prize at the Rome Film Festival, will change their minds.
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Larry Clark

In the 17 years and 6 films since his excoriating debut "Kids," Larry Clark has gradually slipped off many radars, as detractors claimed that precisely what had so shocked and impressed in his early work (explicit sex, violence and drug taking amongst photogenic teenagers) was becoming irrelevant at best, and exploitative at worst. But perhaps his latest film, "Marfa Girl," the first in a mooted trilogy, which won the top prize at the Rome Film Festival, will change their minds (read our review here). 

While the film does offer the green shoots of a new direction for the helmer, his fascination with teenage subcultures and the grungy glamour of his aesthetic are still present. Clark in person, is, as you might expect, almost truculently unapologetic about his recurring thematic concerns, and in fact proudly considers "Marfa Girl" to be "a film where I only put in what I’m interested in." We got to talk to the director in Rome about the movie, which, after the various snafus surrounding distribution for Clark through the years, he is releasing himself through his website, larryclark.com.

Marfa Girl
The Playlist: As so often with your work, one of the film's standout points is its young, often nonprofessional cast. Tell us about the casting process.
Larry Clark: I was inspired [for this whole film] by Adam [Mediano, the lead]. I was in Marfa visiting a friend of mine, Christopher...and there was a little film festival there in this little town of Marfa of 1800 people. And Christopher was going to show No Wave films from the '70s which was the reaction to the New Wave films in France. I had just discovered this little silent film I’d made in 1978 in Tulsa that had been on a shelf all these years...and Christopher asked me to come and show it. So I came to Marfa for the first time, and I showed that and I showed “Wassup Rockers” and “Ken Park.” And so the last night I’m showing “Wassup Rockers” but I’m looking at the audience and it’s not a local crowd, it’s like the art crowd. And so I go, "What the fuck, there should be kids seeing this film." So I go outside and two skate kids skate by, Adam and this other kid and I said, “Come in here, this film’s about you!” So they came in for a few minutes but they had to leave and go to supper and they came back at the end of the film and asked me for a DVD. So I gave it to them and then I’m looking at this kid Adam and I think, boy there’s some charisma in this kid and so it gave me an idea and I went back to Marfa and I photographed him and I got to know him a bit and then Mary Farley [who is also in the film], who I knew, she left town and offered me her casita, so I had her house and the chickens were there. So I wrote her in as Adam’s mother, and I wrote the chickens in. So I started writing the film there for about a month and that’s how it started.

And was financing difficult to find?
I went to LA and I got the money in like 2 days, it was incredible, I had met this kid at a party -- he’s in his early '30s, but he’s a kid to me --and he was a fan and he agreed to finance the film just like that. So we went to Austin and I cast in Austin, there’s a big acting pool there so I’m mixing professional actors with the real kids like Adam and Mercedes [Maxwell, who plays Inez].

Marfa Girl
Aside from Adam, what was it about the town that inspired you?
There’s this culture clash in Marfa where it’s a small town where the locals are the native white people and the native Mexican-American people who were born and raised there. [But] now they’ve put a border patrol station there, a headquarters, even though the border’s 68 miles away, so the border patrol has nothing to do but harass the locals citizens. Plus the artists are coming in now for this art foundation that’s there…so there's a cultural conflict. The new art crowd that doesn’t really interact with the locals; the locals refer to the art crowd as the Chinati's, which is the name of the foundation, and then the fucking border patrol which are a bunch of goons out there fucking with people waiting for Al-Qaeda to come through Marfa which, you know. To get to Marfa you gotta fly through Dallas, fly to El Paso then rent a car and drive four hours. We’re talking about the middle of nowhere, this tiny little place, but it’s kind of a magical place…

It’s a very strange town because the town is like the '50s -- they still paddle kids which would be a crime in almost any other state, from kindergarten up to highschool they paddle kids, plus then there’s a curfew, and if you’re brown and you’re out walking at night they actually tackle you. I added that  scene because it actually happened to Adam and a friend of his.

This article is related to: Rome Film Festival, Larry Clark, Marfa Girl, Interview


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