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L.A. Film Fest: Spike Jonze Talks Music Videos, James Gandolfini, 'Wild Things,' Maurice Sendak & More

Photo of Katie Walsh By Katie Walsh | The Playlist June 25, 2013 at 1:47PM

Yesterday, we brought you our first installment of the Spike Jonze and David O. Russell chat at L.A. Film Fest, where the filmmaker presented clip from his upcoming oddball romantic comedy “Her.” But now we’ve got a recap of the previous hour of the chat, a friendly and lively discussion between the two longtime friends and unofficial collaborators. Opening with with the 2007 skate video “Fully Flared,” Russell guided Jonze through a chat starting with his early days writing magazines Freestylin’ and Dirt, through his music videos, “Being John Malkovich,” “Where the Wild Things Are” and finally to his new project, “Her.”
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Where The Wild Things Are

Working With James Gandolfini On "Where The Wild Things Are"
The discussion of Jonze’s long edit process led them to ‘Wild Things,’ which took 18 months to lock picture and another year of visual effects. Jonze described the process of recording the voices live before shooting the film, which led to a few touching recollections about the late, great James Gandolfini, who plays one of the wild things, Carol in the film. 

"He showed us what the movie was because it had that kind of potency and he brought this electricity to the shoot.” - Spike Jonze discussing James Gandolfini
“We shot the entire script with seven voice actors basically to get the sound live with them all interacting, but also to video tape what they were doing to get the references for guys in the suits— the suits had a sort of subtle, humanistic quality that we were trying to get. We were on a soundstage, the whole soundstage was blocked out with shag carpeting and all the steps were made out of foam cubes, and if we wanted a forest, we’d put the foam cubes in stacks as a forest, or make a cave out of foam cubes. They’re all in their socks and sweatpants and all clothes that don’t make any sound and have headbands on, so it looks like some sort of '70s art piece or something," Jonze reflected. "We’d shot some stuff before James got there, when he got there though, everyone was sort of used to each other and we’d rehearsed together, and then James showed up, and everyone didn’t know what to expect, and he came and, it was the kinda thing that you could feel really ridiculous doing cause you’d be like [roaring noises] and throwing each other and yelling, whatever, in the middle of all this. And James just came in and tore the set apart, the first scene where they’re all ripping down the huts, and he’d just start ripping down and throwing Paul Dano across the set and screaming and yelling and it just upped the electricity of the whole room, all of the actors, all of us had been there with this one vibe and he just took it to this other level and it was 'Oh that’s what the movie is.' It’s like he showed us what the movie was because it had that kind of potency and from then on for the next two and a half weeks, he brought this electricity to the shoot.”

Gandolfini remained dedicated to the film throughout the long post production process, as Jonze wrote and rewrote. "Every two months, we’d call him again and say, ‘Hey Jim, are you around? We wrote some more scenes,’ and he’d be like, ‘Ah, yes, fine,’ and he just kept coming back, two years we were in post basically," Jonze shared. "And he just kept coming back and Eric reminded me the other day, there’s a scene where they built a fort and he wants to rip down the fort because it’s ruined and he’s sort of in this state, he’s having this tantrum, breakdown, and it was a big, emotional scene and we rewrote that probably six or seven times, and had him do it again and again. And he came in one day and he’s like ‘What are we doing today?” and he’s like ‘Ah, this shit again?’ and of course he would do it and every time he would just go there, he would go to this place where this man was crying and sobbing and screaming and he would give it to us every time, because he couldn’t do it any other way. He always had to be honest, and the only time he would ever get angry was if he got angry with himself that it wasn’t honest. He was amazing, an amazing man that just wanted to be true.”

Spike Jonze's Approach To "Where The Wild Things Are" & Friendship With Maurice Sendak

Where The Wild Things Are Max Records

That discussion of Gandolfini in ‘Wild Things’ led to more talk about how difficult it was to adapt the story, the ways that Jonze put his own imprint on the creatures by naming them, and what exactly he wanted to bring to the tale in terms of emotion and theme."We set out to feel like the camera was, photographically at least, following Max, if someone was just trying to document and capture this. The kid is thrown in the middle of this mayhem, a kid in the middle of all these emotions, confusing emotions that are his and adults. As a kid, I think large, adult emotions are very confusing and scary and to be thrown in the middle of that, the camera’s just trying to capture that and it’s not even fitting in the frame, because it feels that overwhelming," Jonze explained. "That, photographically, was how we tried to document Max landing on this island and being with these creatures.” 

And even though there’s an intimidating element to the creatures, Jonze had an ulterior motive for doing the film, and shares why he chose actual costumes over CGI. “When I was writing the movie, I couldn’t wait to build them to get to cuddle with them. I saw a photo of George Lucas making 'Star Wars' and Chewbacca was hugging him and that photo is just amazing to me," he shared. "On set when they’d run down towards you and it felt like a rhinoceros was running at you. I think that’s why we built the creatures for real and didn’t do CG. We went out in the wilderness with the camera with the boy and with these uncontrollable beasts— they’re puppets, they were people in suits they couldn’t see their marks— there’s a sort of wildness to wrangle the things, they would never land in the same spot twice and they would step on Max all the time and knock him over and that sort of added to it, they’d poke him in the eye with the claw, he got battered. Max Records, who’s the heart of the movie, was 9 when we shot that, he just came to work every day and threw himself fearlessly into the middle of all that. We’d be on the edge of these cliffs in Southern Australia and he was just fearless.”

Maurice Sendak
Talk of “Where the Wild Things Are” wouldn’t be complete without a discussion of Jonze’s relationship with writer Maurice Sendak, and the documentary “Tell Them Anything You Want: A Portrait of Maurice Sendak,” which Jonze co-directed with Lance Bangs. Jonze described him as “a great friend and a huge mentor to me,” and citing his advice about what it means to be an artist, saying “I so deeply admired him and would aspire to what he was saying, the ideas to live life to the hardest and keep following your voice and try to be authentic and try to be truthful and I think he did that in his every action and every conversation. It was impossible for him not to be honest, and he was a big influence in many ways.” Part of his motivation was to capture and share Sendak with others during their conversations when Jonze would visit Sendak in Connecticut, bringing a camera in order “to capture this man because I was so in love with him I wanted to capture him to share him with everyone.” Doing the documentary at the same time as ‘Wild Things’ was a helpful process for Jonze, because “it was just fuel for us, just gave us that much more inspiration.”

Though Russell lamented that Jonze is resistant to talking about his personal life, it was definitely an intimate and revealing chat among close friends and a illuminating discussion about the way Jonze works and his creative process. Russell summarizes Jonze well, in saying, "One of the fun things about Spike, is like Max in 'Wild Things' or a skateboard video, you never know when he’s going to throw a beatdown on you, and that just keeps it fun and keeps it young, he’ll just tackle you at any given moment. And when I met you, it was a big breath of fresh air for me. It was a great energy for me."

Her" opens on November 20th. 

This article is related to: L.A. Film Fest, David O. Russell, Spike Jonze, Maurice Sendak, Where The Wild Things Are


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