The Playlist

'Blue Is The Warmest Color,' Wes Anderson's 'Fantastic Mr. Fox' & More Hit Criterion In February 2014

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • November 15, 2013 5:13 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Criterion: February, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Foreign Correspondent
If you are one of those people in a relationship where Valentine's Day means presents, you might want to start dropping some suggestions to your significant other as Criterion has a variety pack of cinematic chocolates that you'll want to savor in February.

Watch: Alfred Hitchcock's 10 Hidden Edits In 'Rope'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 8, 2013 3:01 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Given Alfred Hitchcock's penchant for thrilling stories that demanded a big screen cinematic backdrop to play out on, his decision to adapt Patrick Hamilton’s play "Rope" seemed odd. Set in a single room, where there was no mystery exactly but rather the tension of the murderers getting caught, so perhaps the challenge lay in the contained nature of the story. Hitchcock embraced it, decided that it would be his first Technicolor production (what better way to test the format than in a movie with one location?) and then attempted to create the illusion of a single take movie with no obvious cuts between scenes.

Happy Birthday Alfred Hitchcock! Watch 45-Minute Doc 'Perspectives: Made In Britain' About The Director

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 13, 2013 1:40 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Had Alfred Hitchcock somehow made it all the way to 2013, he would be turning 114 years old today. And while that probably wasn't likely, today is a reminder of just how powerful, influential and flat out entertaining his work remains decades later. One of cinemas premiere filmmakers, entertainers and technicians, Hitchcock broke new ground, delighted and thrilled audiences, and not only conquered cinemas but television too. We could go on for paragraphs about the importance of his work and his impeccable craft, but instead we'll offer you this little birthday treat.

Watch: 30-Minute Interview From 1972 With Alfred Hitchcock, Plus 24 Trailers For His Films

  • By Jason McDonald
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  • July 22, 2013 10:41 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Alfred Hitchcock is one of the few directors whose legendary stature almost overshadows his entire body of work. His films are classic and unforgettable, but the man himself managed to achieve a relationship with the audience that is only comparable to a doctor with a patient. He knew exactly what they needed, even if they didn’t know it or want it. By no means was he a perfect being nor did he have a spotless record, but the man was a master of his craft and a wealth of knowledge. That is why it’s great that we have interviews and discussions, like the one below the break, in which Hitchcock opens up about his career.

Watch: Animated Video Of Alfred Hitchcock's Explanation Of A "MacGuffin"

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 9, 2013 4:16 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Ah yes, the "MacGuffin." The 35-cent word critics like to throw around in reviews of movies that would barely swim in the same pool of Alfred Hitchcock's filmography. Basically, it's the object or device that sets the entire plot into motion in a movie, but that often has very little bearing on the plot or themes. But that sounds boring when we say it, so here's Hitchcock's own heavy, distinctive voice to do the same.

Watch: Guillermo Del Toro Talks Alfred Hitchcock's Dark Humor In 1934's 'The Man Who Knew Too Much'

  • By Ken Guidry
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  • January 15, 2013 11:16 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Today, Alfred Hitchcock’s "The Man Who Knew Too Much" will officially be available on Blu-ray via The Criterion Collection. To honor its release, Criterion has posted a video on YouTube of Guillermo del Toro ("Hellboy," "Pan’s Labyrinth") speaking very fondly of the film and of Hitchcock. Del Toro explains why he considers the 1934 film to be the earliest evidence of Hitchcock’s greatness.

The Disc-Less: 5 British Films Not Available On DVD Including Movies By Alfred Hitchcock, Mike Leigh, Terence Davies & More

  • By Peter Labuza
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  • November 27, 2012 10:07 AM
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  • 7 Comments
With "Hitchcock" now in theaters giving us a (not very accurate) portrait of the Master of Suspense, one of history's greatest directors is once again in the conversation. Additionally, the National Film Preservation is currently streaming a partial copy of "The White Shadow," a 1924 silent by Graham Cutts, one of Hitchcock’s early mentors and collaborators. In honor of Cutts and Hitchcock, this week’s column highlights our neighbors across the Atlantic, with five great classics of British cinema that have yet to grace us with discs of their own here.

6 New 'Hitchcock' Photos Plus Poster, New Clip & Featurette

  • By Edward Davis
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  • November 12, 2012 5:58 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Fox Searchlight is in overdrive mode today with their biggest Oscar contender of the year, bar "The Sessions" with "Hitchock." They've released six new photos, a clip from the film, a new poster and a pretty enlightening featurette which gives you the intriguing meat of the movie. It's about more than just the making of "Psycho" or a Hitchcock biopic and instead about the critical relationship between Hitchcock and Alma Reville: his wife, his editor, his scriptwriter and his most trusted creative confidante.

5 Things You May Not Know About Alfred Hitchcock's 'Spellbound'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 31, 2012 1:57 PM
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  • 2 Comments
We're of the general opinion that you can never get enough Hitchcock, and while we've just wrapped up our massive retrospective of the director's works, to celebrate the release of a new Blu-ray boxset of his work, today has another Hitch connection. These days, Halloween means "Paranormal Activity" sequels in theaters (and before that, "Saw" movies), but in the past, when the holiday wasn't such a corporate behemoth, more interesting fare made it to theaters for that time of year. And October 31st, 1945 saw the release of Hitchcock's "Spellbound."

Retrospective: The Films Of Alfred Hitchcock Pt. 2 (1940-1976, The Hollywood Years)

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 31, 2012 12:59 PM
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  • 6 Comments
In the late 1930s, with films like "The Man Who Knew Too Much," "The 39 Steps" and "The Lady Vanishes" having proven global hits, the New York Times wrote: "Three unique and valuable institutions the British have that we in America have not. Magna Carta, the Tower Bridge and Alfred Hitchcock, the greatest director of screen melodramas in the world." And unsurprisingly, he came to the attention of Hollywood, with David O. Selznick signing the filmmaker to an exclusive contract, and bringing him over to direct "Rebecca."

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