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After 'The Artist': Berenice Bejo Talks Michel Hazanavicius' 'The Search,' Jean Dujardin To Star With Tim Roth In 'Mobius'

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • May 18, 2012 8:50 AM
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  • 2 Comments
As Harvey Weinstein crawls on hands and knees up the Croisette, searching desperately for the next film to equal the success of last year’s golden child, “The Artist,” it can be hard to recall just how unique and singular the film seemed when first shown at Cannes, before its subsequent release and obnoxious awards season buzz. The plain fact is, director Michel Hazanavicius & Co. made a tremendous film, and today news has sprung up that the cast and crew will continue to pursue interesting projects, ones that find them in a distinctly different environment than before.

'The Artist' Helmer Michel Hazanavicius & Wife Berenice Bejo Reteaming For Movie Inspired By Fred Zinneman's 'The Search'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 9, 2012 9:17 AM
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  • 1 Comment
When you're the helmer and star of a near-universally beloved sleeper hit, with Oscars virtually in the bag, it's one of the few scenarios (bar a billion dollar hit) which means your next project can be pretty much whatever you like. The offers roll in, of course, but you have enough kudos that you could ask for $50 million to film a biopic of Shirley Temple, starring Edward James Olmos, and someone would step up to fund it.

'The Help' & 'The Artist' Lead The Field At Screen Actors Guild Awards Nominations

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • December 14, 2011 9:36 AM
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  • 8 Comments
In the seventeen years that they've been running for, the annual Screen Actors' Guild Awards have proven to be a pretty reliable precursor for the acting categories at the Academy Awards. And why shouldn't they? With the actors who nominate their peers for the Oscars overwhelmingly being SAG members, there's always going to be a natural link, and certainly by the time the guild award their prizes, it's a good time to make a bet. In the last few years, they've only missed Penelope Cruz in "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," Marion Cotillard in "La Vie En Rose" and Alan Arkin in "Little Miss Sunshine" as winners, while the nominees tend to match up heavily -- last year, seventeen out of twenty in the acting categories were the same, while all five nominees in the Outstanding Cast category won Oscar nominations. 

'The Artist' Star Bérénice Bejo & Emir Kusturica To Star In 'The Scapegoat'

  • By Simon Dang
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  • December 5, 2011 10:21 AM
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  • 1 Comment
No matter how they'll fare during the upcoming award season, it was really only a matter of time before we heard a lot more from "The Artist" stars Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Their demand is sure to shoot through the roof and, now, it looks like Bejo is already plotting her upcoming schedule, scoring a role in an adaptation of Daniel Pennac's classic French novel "The Scapegoat (Au Bonheur des Ogres)" co-starring Raphaël Personnaz and Emir Kusturica.

Berenice Bejo Talks About Not Talking In The Silent Movie Sensation 'The Artist'

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • November 22, 2011 11:41 AM
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  • 1 Comment
There’s not a whole lot of dialogue in “The Artist” that isn’t delivered via intertitle, but it’s all in English, effectively deceiving audiences about the fact that it’s a mostly French production. But when asked about the challenges of making what amounts to a silent film in an era of audiovisual spectacle, co-star Berenice Bejo revealed a technique that some might consider almost stereotypically European. “I think it’s all about pleasure,” Bejo explained during recent press rounds in Los Angeles for “The Artist.”

NYFF '11: 'The Artist' Director Michel Hazanavicius Credits Orson Welles As One Of Many Influences

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 15, 2011 6:49 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Director Wanted To Revive Silent Movie Style For A Contemporary Movie AudienceDespite stealing audiences' hearts and walking away from the prestigious Cannes Film Festival with the Best Actor Award, Michel Hazanavicius's nostalgia-fueled silent feature "The Artist" may have its work cut out for it. Will regular movie-goers go and see something like this in an era when the mere thought of a flick not being in color is appalling? It's a tough call, but with the right push, it might get sales solely based on the fact it's unlike anything in at the cineplex today. After that, all the movie needs is five minutes: it's an instant charmer, an escapist picture done with flair and an enormous amount of heart.

Watch: Six Clips From Crowd-Pleasing Silent Oscar Contender 'The Artist'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 15, 2011 1:22 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The big film that no one saw coming this year was Michel Hazanavicius's "The Artist." The director was best known for his cult French comedies in the "OSS 117" series, and reunited with star Jean Dujardin for a silent movie homage, riffing on films from "Singin' in the Rain" to "A Star Is Born," shot in black and white and with (almost) no dialogue.

Cannes Review: 'The Artist' A Joyous, Big Hearted Tribute To Old School Moviemaking

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 15, 2011 8:23 AM
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  • 2 Comments
When The Weinstein Company announced last week just before the kick off the Cannes Film Festival that they had picked up Michel Hazanavicius' "The Artist" it was certainly a surprise. Harvey and Bob laid down big bucks for a film that, in this age of CGI and 3D blockbuster pictures, seems like box office poison. A silent film, in black and white, led by two French stars that are virtually unknown in the United States, it doesn't seem like the kind of movie that, outside of arthouse buffs, would catch on with a broader audience. But, the Weinstein instincts were right on as screening this morning for critics, not only did "The Artist" play like gangbusters to critics who applauded the film at various points during the film but more importantly, Hazanavicius' film is a pure joy. Wildly entertaining, with a big generous heart, "The Artist" is not just an exercise in old school filmmaking, it's a beautifully told story that is classic and timeless in feel.

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