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10 Highlights Of The BFI London Film Festival Line-Up

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 4, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The early months of fall are pretty much stacked with film festivals. From the end of August, when Venice and Telluride kick off the season, to the prestigious and star-studded selections at Toronto and New York in September and October, to the increasingly important AFI and Rome film festivals, globe-trotting cinephiles could happily go back to back from the late summer pretty much up to Christmas hopping from one festival to another.

'Argo,' 'Rust And Bone,' 'Amour' & More Head To BFI London Film Festival

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 5, 2012 7:58 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Telluride is wrapped, Venice heads into its final days and TIFF is just about to gear up, but the festival season is far from over. The BFI London Film Festival has dropped their slate this morning and not only is it pulling titles from all those fests, it has nabbed the best of Sundance and Cannes as well for what is a greatest hits package of sorts for cinephiles.

'Great Expectations' Starring Ralph Fiennes & Helena Bonham Carter Will Close 56th BFI London Film Festival

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 30, 2012 9:01 AM
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Venice, Toronto, New York....so that's all the festival business we have, right? Lucky for movie fans, the answer is no. October brings with it the BFI London Film Festival, and they're now beginning to raise the curtain on what they'll be presenting. And they've got a very fitting capper in the works.

LFF '11: Gerardo Naranjo On Innocence, The Genesis Of 'Miss Bala' And 'Intelligent Action Movies'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 28, 2011 5:48 AM
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Plus, More From The Director And The Film's Star Stephanie SigmanAside from Steven Soderbergh's "Traffic" over a decade ago, there haven't been a lot of decent movies focusing on the drug trade just over the border. Sure, the cartels crop up from time to time, but mostly in villains in dumb action movies, but it feels like quite a while since we've had a really smart, incisive look at that terrifying world.

LFF '11: Felicity Jones Says Her Performance In 'Like Crazy' Was Influenced By 'Breaking The Waves'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 27, 2011 7:59 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Rising U.K. Star & Sundance Breakout Actress Wants To Play A Superhero Or A SnakeHow's your 2011 been? Pretty good? Even so, we bet you've not had as good a year as Felicity Jones is having. The 27-year-old Brit has been working away for over ten years, starting with kids' TV favorite "The Worst Witch" and long-running radio drama "The Archers," with more recent roles on both the small screen ("Doctor Who," "Northanger Abbey") and the big ("Cheri," "Brideshead Revisited," "The Tempest"), but she's headed into the stratosphere in the last twelve months.

LFF '11: Drake Doremus Says He Shot 'Like Crazy' For $250,000 On A $1,500 Still Camera

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 26, 2011 10:04 AM
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  • 5 Comments
And More We Learned From The Director Of The Sundance Award-Winning Romance The Sundance Grand Jury Prize is traditionally something of a kiss of death for an indie, in terms of gaining a wider audience. Irrespective of the quality of the film, the likes of "Girls Town," "Sunday," "Three Seasons," "Slam," "Forty Shades of Blue," "Quinceanera" and "Padre Nuestro" never really set the world alight, did they? But things have changed in recent years, with the last two winners, "Precious" and "Winter's Bone," both picking up Best Picture Academy Award nominations, and this year's victorious movie has just as good a good chance at crossing over to a more mainstream audience

LFF '11 Review: Rebecca Hall Chiller 'The Awakening' Is Flawed, But Also Kind Of A Blast

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 25, 2011 3:49 AM
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  • 1 Comment
It might seem ingracious to complain, but film festivals can sometimes be something of a slog. For every transcendent piece of cinema, there are two or three well-meaning, firmly mediocre pictures clogged with mental illness, child abuse and miserable sex. Which is exactly why most film festivals mix it up a little, with a midnight genre strand, or just introducing something a little more...fun into the mix.

LFF '11 Review: 'Wild Bill' Is An Immensely Likable Directorial Debut From Dexter Fletcher

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 23, 2011 5:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments
For whatever reason, directorial debuts by British character actors tend to lean towards the gritty kitchen-sink drama; Tim Roth, Gary Oldman and, more recently, Paddy Considine have all broken their filmmaking cherry with uncompromisingly tough, bleak subject matter. Considering that it involves abandonment, council estates and the risk of being taken into care, one might be forgiven for expecting the same from Dexter Fletcher's first film, "Wild Bill." But then, Fletcher's best known for being one of the central quartet, alongside Jason Statham, Jason Flemyng and Nick Moran, in Guy Ritchie's debut "Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels," and for appearing frequently in Matthew Vaughn's pictures, so could Fletcher have turned out some kind of guns and geezers movie instead?

LFF '11 Review: Michael Winterbottom's 'Trishna' Is Picturesque, But Entirely Lacking In Passion

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 22, 2011 7:28 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Over his career, Michael Winterbottom has hopped frequently from genre to genre, from subject matter to subject matter, rarely covering the same territory twice. But one of the few things he has returned to is the work of Thomas Hardy. The late 19th century British author has so far inspired two of the director's films: 1995's "Jude," an adaptation of "Jude the Obscure" with Kate Winslet, and "The Claim," a version of "The Mayor of Casterbridge" moved to a Californian mountain Western setting.

LFF '11 Review: Nasty Nordic Thriller 'Headhunters' Doesn't Have The Courage Of Its Convictions

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 18, 2011 7:07 AM
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  • 1 Comment
For fans of the crime genre, both on the page and on the screen, Scandinavia has been the hottest source of new material in recent years (although obviously not literally). Steig Larsson's Millennium trilogy was a huge bestseller worldwide, and has already provided three Swedish films and David Fincher's upcoming remake "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo," while Kenneth Branagh has had great success on TV as Henning Mankell's "Wallander," and Danish series "The Killing" proved a huge hit at home and in the U.K, and was remade on AMC under the same name.

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