The Playlist

Cannes: Walter Salles Talks The Long Journey To Make 'On The Road'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 27, 2012 1:17 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Given that the source material was once described by Truman Capote with the immortal epithet "That's not writing, that's typing," and is a generally unruly thing to adapt, it's not surprising that it's taken the best part of half-a-century to make a film of Jack Kerouac's beat classic "On The Road." Plans were in the works as early as the publication date in 1957 (Kerouac wanted to co-star in the film with Marlon Brando), and documentarian D.A. Pennebaker came close, but it's Francis Ford Coppola who's been the driving force, developing the project since the release of "Apocalypse Now" in 1979.

'Beasts Of The Southern Wild' & 'In The Fog' Win FIPRESCI Prizes At Cannes

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 26, 2012 3:23 PM
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More prizes are being handed out this evening in Cannes as the festival winds down for another year. With Tim Roth and his jury handing out the plaudits for Un Certain Regard, FIPRESCI, the International Federation of Film Critics, have handed out their honors for the fest.

'Después de Lucía' Takes Top Prize In Un Certain Regard At Cannes; 'Laurence Anyways,' 'Djeca' & More Also Earn Honors

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 26, 2012 2:32 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The Nice airport is getting a bit less busy, and the cafés and hotels on the Croisette are quieter as the Cannes Film Festival wraps up today. Awards are starting to be handed out and first up are the prizes for the festival's Un Certain Regard category, which tends to feature newer, lesser-known directors and slightly edgier fare than the main competition lineup.

Cannes Review: Sprawling 'Hemingway & Gellhorn' Worthy Of The Rough & Tumble Life Of Two Great Writers

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 26, 2012 1:50 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Ernest Hemingway is the kind of grandiose figure that it seems it would be difficult to contain within the framework of a feature film, and the decision to pair his life with that of his ex-wife Martha Gellhorn only adds to the task at hand. But with the leisure of a two-and-a-half hour running time, a starry ensemble, the guiding hands of director Philip Kaufman ("The Right Stuff," "The Unbearable Lightness Of Being") and the support of HBO, "Hemingway & Gellhorn" is a messy, but still worthwhile film about the two writers that does a strong job of bringing their complex, explosive and committed relationship to the big screen.

Cannes Review: 'Mud' Starring Matthew McConaughey Is An Underwhelming Anti-Fairy Tale

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • May 26, 2012 8:28 AM
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  • 27 Comments
"Mud," American writer/director Jeff Nichols' underwhelming follow-up to the masterfully visceral "Take Shelter," is a shallow and contrived coming of age story. While both 'Shelter' and "Shotgun Stories," Nichols' promising debut feature, explore their respective characters' motives and emotions, "Mud" instead offers pat sentiments and bland bathos.

Pablo Larrain's 'No' Starring Gael Garcia Bernal Takes Top Prize At Cannes Directors' Fortnight

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 25, 2012 4:37 PM
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  • 0 Comments
It has been one helluva week for Pablo Larrain. Easily one of the most buzzed-about movies on the Croisette -- and it wasn't even in the proper festival lineup, playing the Directors' Fortnight instead -- the biggest question being asked among those who saw and fell in love with "No" was how the Cannes selection committee didn't manage to snag this one for themselves. In the end, it doesn't matter -- the movie spoke for itself and has walked away with the top prize, the Art Cinema Award.

Cannes: Shia Labeouf Talks The "Messy, Dirty, Realistic" Violence Of 'Lawless' & John Hillcoat Explains How Guy Pearce Scared Nick Cave's Kids

  • By Benjamin Wright
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  • May 25, 2012 2:24 PM
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  • 0 Comments
For fans of Australian helmer John Hillcoat, it’s been a long wait since his last film, the adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's novel “The Road” in 2009. However, it looks like patience has paid off with his latest film, “Lawless,” which tells the tale of the Depression-era Bondurant brothers whose successful bootlegging operation in Franklin County, Virginia is soon threatened by authorities who are looking to cut their profits. Based on the novel “The Wettest County In the World” (which the film was originally titled), written by Matt Bondurant—grandson of one of the main characters in the novel—"Lawless," penned by famed musician and screenwriter Nick Cave, had its world premiere at Cannes last weekend. The film was received with a significant amount of praise, with our own writer saying “as far as top-tier storytelling goes, it doesn't get much better than this.”

Cannes: Andrew Dominik Says He's Aiming To Make "Emotional Nightmare Fairy-Tale" Marilyn Monroe Biopic 'Blonde' Next

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 25, 2012 12:05 PM
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  • 6 Comments
After a few years in the wilderness after the masterpiece "The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford" underperformed at the box office, Andrew Dominik's third film -- initially titled "Cogan's Trade" after the George V. Higgins book on which it's based, and later retitled "Killing Them Softly" -- came together quite quickly. The first hints emerged in September 2010, and within a few months it had a star and producer in Brad Pitt, a distributor courtesy of The Weinstein Company, and rolled in front of cameras in early 2011.

Cannes: Guy Pearce Talks Playing Camp & Shaving His Eyebrows In 'Lawless'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 25, 2012 11:01 AM
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  • 4 Comments
It takes a fair amount of talent to appear in a film alongside practiced scene-stealers like Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Jessica Chastain, Mia Wasikowska, Jason Clarke and Shia LaBeouf. But of course, as audiences have been aware of for getting on two decades, since he came to attention in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert," Guy Pearce is possessed of an unusual amount of talent.

Cannes Review: David Cronenberg's 'Cosmopolis' Is Both An Excellent Adaptation & A Rich, Complex Character Study

  • By Simon Abrams
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  • May 25, 2012 8:12 AM
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  • 12 Comments
"Cosmopolis," an adaptation of Don DeLillo’s typically provocative novel of the same name, is the first feature film since 1999's "eXistenZ" that filmmaker David Cronenberg has directed and scripted. This in part explains why "Cosmopolis" is such a triumph: it’s both an exceptional adaptation and a remarkable work unto itself.

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