The Playlist

Cannes Review: Over The Top 'Broken' Starring Tim Roth & Cillian Murphy Can't Get It Together

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • May 18, 2012 8:00 AM
  • |
  • 6 Comments
There is a difference between a kitchen sink drama and a drama that includes everything but the kitchen sink, and unfortunately for "Broken," it's more of the latter than the former. Marking the feature debut by theater director Rufus Norris and with Tim Roth, Cillian Murphy and Rory Kinnear among the ensemble, the is the kind of movie that mistakes adding a new plot twist every fifteen minutes for narrative momentum and drama.

Cannes Clips: 'Killing Them Softly,' 'On The Road,' 'Lawless,' Mud,' 'The Paper Boy,' & Many More

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 9:12 PM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
Right now and for the next week or so, a few hundred lucky film critics (including representatives of The Playlist) are at the Cannes Film Festival where they get to see some of the most anticipated films of the year all within a few days of each other. But what are the rest of us to do? Sure, "Moonrise Kingdom" opens next week, but some of the films in competition at Cannes don't even have distributors, and it could be months or even years before they make it to movie houses in your own country.

The Cannes Croisette Digest Day #2: 'Django Unchained' Sneak Playing To Buyers? 'Cloud Atlas' Gets Revealed

  • By Edward Davis
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 8:51 PM
  • |
  • 6 Comments
It's day two of the 65th annual Cannes Film Festival, and in a timely fashion we're kicking off our not-so-daily Cannes report. What's happened so far?

New U.K. Poster and Trailer Arrive For David Cronenberg's 'Cosmopolis'

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 11:39 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Hot on the heels of the announcement that David Cronenberg’s wildly anticipated adaptation of Don DeLillo’s “Cosmopolis,” starring Robert Pattinson as a disaffected non-vampire millionaire on a very strange 24-hour odyssey through Manhattan, has secured a June 15th release date in England, we now get a British trailer and poster for the picture. Neither are terribly new, keeping with the already-seen promotional materials. But that doesn’t mean we’re any less stoked.

Cannes Review: 'After The Battle' A Well-Intentioned, But Manipulative Drama About The Egyptian Revolution

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 8:59 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Gil Scott-Heron famously said "The revolution will not be televised," but as the Occupy movement and the events in Syria and Egypt have shown, not only are these actions on TV, they're on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube as well. Social media and the ever-quickening 24 hours cycle have seen protestors and governments alike shift and adapt strategies, tactics and rhetoric faster than ever before. And it's against this backdrop that director Yousry Nasrallah has delivered "After The Battle," a well-intentioned if clunky and uneven drama set among the boiling tension and emotion of the uprisings in Egypt in 2011.

Cannes Review: 'The We & The I' Is A Testing, Patronizing Let-Down From Michel Gondry

  • By James Rocchi
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 7:41 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Like some Gallic version of Tim Burton, Michel Gondry's initial promise has given way to a series of films whose diminishing returns demonstrate that he's a talented visualist without the capacity for, or worse, any interest in, telling an actual story. Gondry's defenders will, of course, point to the excellent "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," but the passage of years has made it abundantly clear that the credit for that film is entirely screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's; Gondry may have gotten out of the way of that script, but that's hardly a reason to celebrate his skills or capablities, such as they are, beyond that. The messy "Be Kind, Rewind," the cutesy-creepy "The Science of Sleep," the noisome and needless "Green Hornet" ... Gondry's name above a title has gone from being a reason to seek a film to being a reason to shun it.

Cannes Review: Blood & Water Flow Freely In Jacques Audiard's Beautiful & Moving 'Rust & Bone'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • May 17, 2012 6:44 AM
  • |
  • 11 Comments
What is it we do to survive? Who is it we love? Who is it we fight? What are the forces seen and unseen that push our lives in directions we could have never expected? These are the questions that Jacques Audiard tackles in his latest "Rust And Bone," a beautiful, moving story of two fractured lives that somehow, together, combine into a single (if unconventional) whole.

Alec Baldwin & James Toback Team Up For Secret Cannes Documentary 'Seduced and Abandoned'

  • By Joe Cunningham
  • |
  • May 16, 2012 10:19 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Cannes. Cannes, Cannes, Cannes, Cannes, Cannes. CANNES! Okay, now that I’ve gently eased you into it, here's some news from everyone’s favourite film festival - you know, the one that kicked off today. This piece of news comes from Cannes, and is about a film that’s being made at Cannes, which is about raising money at Cannes to make another movie – that other movie could be set anywhere really…but nobody’s ruling out Cannes.

Cannes Review: Wes Anderson's 'Moonrise Kingdom' Is A Tender Triumph Of Design, Decor & Rich Emotion

  • By James Rocchi
  • |
  • May 16, 2012 9:45 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
Wes Anderson's "Moonrise Kingdom" seems like an odd choice to open the 65th Cannes Film Festival, with its deadpan Americanism, retro-set timeline and movie-star cast; at the same time, Anderson is clearly influenced by the New Wave, both cinematically and personally, he's a distinctive authorial voice as a director (which is the essence of auteur theory) and while his films are defined by near-silent moments of comedy and human frailty, there's also something mournful and wounded about them. "Moonrise Kingdom," like all of Anderson's films, is a very beautiful and funny movie about grief and sorrow, and the never-was 1965 the film takes place in is both a meticulously-crafted triumph of design and decor and an emotionally rich setting, full of objects you could almost reach out and touch and feelings, yearnings, that reach out to you.

The Weinsteins Acquire Cannes Pic 'The Sapphires' & Have Their Eye On James Gray's 'Low Life'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • May 15, 2012 5:46 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Everything kicks off tomorrow, but the dealmaking has already begun at the Cannes Film Festival and Harvey Weinstein is already busy shaking hands and signing contracts.

Email Updates

Recent Comments