The Playlist

Now On DVD: Roland Emmerich Reveals His 5 Biggest Influences On 'White House Down'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 6, 2013 2:26 PM
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  • 3 Comments
White House Down, Roland Emmerich
This week, "White House Down," the deliriously silly (but ridiculously entertaining) White House hijacking movie, starring Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx, detonates onto Blu-ray and DVD. In honor of the film's release, we chatted with "White House Down" filmmaker Roland Emmerich and asked him to run down the five biggest influences on the film (which this writer places amongst the top tier of the director's work). At first he was reluctant ("I feel back in school, like I had to do homework"), but eventually he shared what fuelled his movie. Read on to find out what inspired "White House Down," the dirty wife beater Channing wears and Jamie Foxx's famous line about his sneakers.

The Playlist's 15 Favorite Movie Dance-Offs

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • September 19, 2013 2:42 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Our 15 Favorite Movie Dance-Offs
As we embark on another awards pre-season, and anticipate the legions of “For Your Consideration”-style advertising we have to look forward to over the coming months, we felt it an opportune moment to highlight a film that is unlikely to be figuring largely in those conversations: this week’s “Battle of the Year” starring widely disliked person Chris Brown alongside Joshes Holloway and Peck. Because the funny thing is, no matter how B-grade its cast, formulaic its plot or potentially jingoistic its premise (“Bring that trophy back for AMERICA”) there will be a certain segment of the Playlist population who will don sunglasses and fake mustaches and go see it. It’s a dance movie, you see, and the love that a shockingly high proportion of us bear this unworthy genre is one of our best kept secrets.

Sony & King Of Nuance Neal H. Moritz To Remake Jacques Audiard's 'A Prophet'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • June 5, 2013 3:14 PM
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  • 5 Comments
This isn't necessarily shocking news but the timing is sort of weird: The Wrap is reporting that Sony and subtlety-proof Original Films producer Neil H. Moritz have optioned the remake rights to Jacques Audiard's jaw-dropping French crime epic "A Prophet." The original movie, which charted the ascension of a small time criminal who, after being imprisoned, rises in the criminal ranks, was nominated for the 2010 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar and won the Grand Prix award at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival. Something tells us the remake will escape similar glories.

Steven Soderbergh Says 'Magic Mike 2' Will Be Built From Discarded Plot Idea From First Movie, Will Reunite All Characters

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • April 29, 2013 9:24 AM
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  • 3 Comments
When he's not spending his newfound retirement from film dropping novella truths on Twitter and promoting “Beyond the Candelabra,” Steven Soderbergh is also lending a hand to Channing Tatum on the sequel to their hit drama “Magic Mike.” Both have obviously cut out questions of a cash-in, and in a recent interview with the director, he's pushed their case further as well as hinted at the film's plot.

'21 Jump Street 2' Gets Official Summer 2014 Release Date

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2013 1:19 PM
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  • 0 Comments
It's been continually teased over the past week, with Sony revealing they wanted a "21 Jump Street" sequel for 2014, and the news that original directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were back to direct, and the movie just got even realer with an official release date announced today.

Review: 'Side Effects' A Satisfying, Twisty Psychodramatic Thriller From Steven Soderbergh

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • February 1, 2013 9:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
"Side Effects," a twisty-turny psychodrama and thriller, will occupy a special place in the Steven Soderbergh oeuvre. Since his highly influential debut "sex, lies, and videotape" single-handedly launched the American independent film revival, his body of work has included 26 films that have covered an absurd amount of topical ground, nevermind all the genres he's dipped into. If all goes according to plan, "Side Effects," will be the last Steven Soderbergh movie ever released theatrically. In some ways this puts an almost unfair amount of pressure on the complex little thriller, especially considering that the film may be better suited for premium cable than his upcoming HBO Liberace biopic "Behind the Candelabra." The picture's conspiratorial late-night tone and fleshy after hours luridness was practically built for watching at night, when our parents think we've gone off to bed (think '80s films directed by folks like Adrian Lyne). Like much of his recent output, "Side Effects" is a somewhat slight genre exercise, but given that it's Soderbergh, it's stylistically unparalleled, totally gripping and occasionally devastating in its emotional presentation thanks to its two leads Rooney Mara and Jude Law.

Review: 'Son Of No One' Suggests 'I Know What You Did Last Summer' As Written By Dennis Lehane

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 3, 2011 9:30 AM
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  • 1 Comment
In the relatively ridiculous new procedural/mystery "Son of No One," Channing Tatum, as a mustachioed police officer married to Katie Holmes (and looking after an epileptic daughter), is sent taunting letters and anonymous text messages alluding to a violent incident from his past. (The movie is set way back in 2002 which is why he doesn't receive cryptic emails too. Because no one used email in 2002 apparently). You can tell how terribly we're supposed to take the threats because of all the shaky shots of Tatum flipping open his ancient cell phone, the scenes shot in sickly shades of blue and green. Except that instead of coming across as suspenseful or menacing, it's just silly and laughable, like something out of a teen slasher movie or ABC Family series, lacking anything approximating weight or gravitas.

Pantelion Films To Release Will Ferrell's Spanish Comedy 'Casa De Mi Padre' On March 16, 2012

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 3, 2011 3:17 AM
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  • 1 Comment
While Anchor Bay Nab Starry Channing Tatum-Led Ensemble Drama 'Ten Year'For a while, we were starting to wonder if we'd dreamed the Will Ferrell comedy "Casa De Mi Padre." On almost no one's radar before the start of this year, a surprise trailer for the project, a Spanish-language film co-starring Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna, debuted back in the spring, but nothing's been heard from the film since, and we had to double check our archives to make sure it was a real thing, and not something that we'd imagined after a night with too many telenovelas and too much meth.

Channing Tatum To Get Murdered By Steve Carell In Bennett Miller's 'Foxcatcher'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 19, 2011 1:26 AM
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  • 1 Comment
We've said it before, and we'll say it again -- Channing Tatum is nothing if not determined. The actor who launched to fame with "Step Up" has eagerly taken on any role he can just to work with a top shelf director. The roster of talent he has spent time with on set -- Kimberly Peirce, Michael Mann, Ron Howard, Kevin Macdonald, Steven Soderbergh (x2) -- speaks for itself. As a producer, he's throwing his weight around on upcoming films like "Ten Year," "21 Jump Street" and "Magic Mike," but he's continuing to seek out opportunities to grow as an actor. His physique doesn't allow him a chameleon presence on screen, but his quest to take on strong dramatic material may have found him the perfect middle ground—a role where his bulk is part of the territory.

Watch: Moody Trailer for Channing Tatum Crime Drama 'The Son of No One'

  • By Sam Price
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  • September 15, 2011 1:39 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Channing Tatum has made it hard for us to love him over the years. He began his days as a dancer in a Ricky Martin video, parlayed that success into modelling for the obnoxious eugenic fashion dystopia known to the world as Abercrombie & Fitch, before bumbling into Amanda Bynes transvestite comedies and drippy Nicolas Sparks adaptations. But he’s always seemed to have more fight in him than his anonymous contemporaries (hello, Sam Worthington), a willingness to mock himself as seen in the otherwise dull Allan Loeb-scripted comedy “The Dilemma,” and to have a nose for sniffing out promising material with respectable directors – “Public Enemies,” “The Eagle” – even if the end results often leave a lot to be desired.

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