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The Playlist

Tom Hiddleston Moves Into Ben Wheatley's 'High Rise,' Ewan McGregor Spends 'Last Days In The Desert' & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 5, 2014 9:23 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Tom Hiddleston Ben Wheatley HIgh Rise
Prolific as he is, Ben Wheatley's films to date generally haven't featured much in the way of star power, but it was only a matter of time until bigger names started circling his work. And indeed, his next effort will find Loki himself coming along for the ride.

Venice '11 Review: 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy' Is A Remarkable, Quietly Devastating Spy Movie

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 5, 2011 12:33 PM
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  • 11 Comments
The spy genre, is generally speaking, a euphemism for 'action movie' -- look at the explosions, fistfights and car chases of the Bond films, of the 'Mission: Impossible' series, of the 'Bourne' franchise, none of which have much in the way of actual tradecraft. The business of being a spy is hard, boring work, made up of listening and talking and without a lot of glamor. One of the men who best understands this is novelist John Le Carré, himself a former spy, who for close to half a century has been behind some of the most acclaimed literary examples of the genre. But aside from the much-loved "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold," and the more recent "The Constant Gardener" (the latter not strictly speaking an espionage picture), his works haven't had a huge amount of success on the big screen, lacking the speedboats and fireballs of Ian Fleming or Robert Ludlum. One of the writer's best-known books is "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy," the first of the 'Karla' trilogy, which focuses on George Smiley, a middle-aged veteran of 'The Circus' (Le Carré's term for the British intelligence services) and his rivalry with his Soviet counterpart Karla. Working Title Films has spent the last couple of years on a new cinematic take with Tomas Alfredson, director of the much-acclaimed "Let the Right One In," making his English-language debut at the helm. It's no small undertaking, considering that the novel was previously adapted as a much-loved, seven-part, 290-minute BBC miniseries, headed up by an indelible performance from the great Alec Guinness. Alfredson might have assembled an all-star cast of British talent to bring the book to life, but could the company, led by Gary Oldman taking up Smiley's thick glasses, hope to match their predecessors? And could the film manage to keep the plot coherent and thrilling at a running time less than half of what the TV take had to play with?

Watch: Get All Kinds Of Goosebumps With Outstanding Teaser Trailer For 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • June 30, 2011 9:41 AM
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  • 18 Comments
Wow. Maybe it's just the way our brains are wired, but we just saw more fireworks from 70-odd seconds of middle-aged British character actors than we got across two-and-a-half-hours of empty spectacle in "Transformers: Dark of the Moon." The Guardian just debuted the first international teaser trailer for one of our most anticipated films of the rest of the year, Working Title's adaptation of John Le Carre's spy classic "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy," the English-language debut of "Let The Right One In" director Tomas Alfredson, and it's easily one of the best trailers we've seen in an age.

Watch: Pierce Brosnan, Greg Kinnear & Jennifer Connelly In Trailer For 'Salvation Boulevard'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 24, 2011 1:04 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The next few months might be dominated by summer blockbusters, but we're also starting to get the festival hits from the last six months: acclaimed indies from Toronto, Sundance and SXSW, films like "Submarine," "Beginners," "The Trip" and "Page One," all land in the next while and a trailer has just debuted for one of the starrier offerings from Park City this year.

Tilda Swinton & Ciarán Hinds Cast In 'Sisters'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • May 17, 2011 8:11 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Which Has The Unfortunate Pitch Of 'Sister Act' Meets 'Dead Poets Society' WARNING: The following news should not be read by those affected by heart conditions, high blood pressure, or any other conditions that could be aggravated by extreme emotional ups and downs. Likewise, expectant women should use caution, even if they are a fan of Whoopi Goldberg's duet.

'Ghost Rider 2' Gets Budget Slashed By $60 Million, Will Be Made For A Paltry $75 Million

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • October 27, 2010 8:11 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Nicolas Cage Will Somehow Have To Survive With A $7 Million PaycheckIndustry analysts claim the recession ended in June 2009, but how can that be true if it still troubles our superheroes? It was just 2007 when Nicolas Cage was suited up to play Johnny Blaze in "Ghost Rider," a film budgeted north of $110 million. Cage received somewhere between $12 and $20 million upfront, and the film grossed $229 worldwide before a healthy DVD life. Mortgages were paid, Sony was flush with cash, and everyone was happy.

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