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The Playlist

National Board Of Review Gives Best Picture & Director To 'Hugo'; Tilda Swinton & George Clooney Take Acting Awards

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • December 1, 2011 4:14 PM
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  • 8 Comments

In Theaters: 'J. Edgar' Investigates 'Jack and Jill' & 'Immortals' For Crimes Against Cinema

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • November 11, 2011 5:47 PM
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  • 0 Comments
11/11/11! Did you make a wish? I was writing this column at 11:11 a.m. and missed it by one minute. Oh well, I don't much go in for that superstitious stuff, but I hope all your 11:11 wishes and hopes and dreams come true. This weekend at the theater is a weird mix of prestige and flat out horrible crap. For every "J. Edgar," you get a "Jack and Jill;" for every "Melancholia," there's an "Immortals." What are you gonna do?!

Review: 'Elite Squad: The Enemy Within' Is A Frantic, Expertly Knotty Thriller

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 9, 2011 2:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
"Elite Squad: The Enemy Within" is a direct sequel to the original "Elite Squad," which was a smart, byzantine thriller largely defined by its bright bursts of color and raw, unhinged momentum that Paul Greengrass would have probably defined as "a little intense." The original film followed Captain Roberto Nascimento (Wagner Moura, his jaw as sharp as an axe blade), a member of the elite tactical unit BOPE – kind of Rio de Janeiro's more militarized version of the SWAT team, and the only police group that the bad guys knew not to fuck with. While there were tangled threads of plot in the first film involving police corruption, raids on dangerous slums, and drug dealers' involvement in non-profit student groups, it chiefly focused on Nascimento training and implementing a worthy successor to his position. With a baby on the way, he wanted out. And he found the perfect person in Andre Matias (Andre Ramiro), a ramrod straight arrow who would resist corruption and ferret out criminal activity wherever it lay.

Jose Padilha Says 'Elite Squad' Sequel Is His Scorsese-Like Take On Cops & Politics In Brazil

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • September 28, 2011 10:25 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Brazilian Auteur Talks "Fascist Vs. Marxist" Perspective In Filmmaking, Police Corruption, Social Politics & MoreJose Padilha may currently be best known for directing the upcoming remake of Paul Verhoeven’s “RoboCop,” but rest assured that the Brazilian filmmaker is anything but a purveyor of style brought in to polish off a classic property. His previous work, including the documentary “Bus 174,” the police thriller “Elite Squad,” and its new sequel “The Enemy Within,” was not only hugely successful in his native Brazil, but it was all distinguished by a sophisticated, incisive commentary on contemporary culture which will undoubtedly come in handy as he revisits Verhoeven’s iconic satire.

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