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Review: 'RoboCop' Starring Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Abbie Cornish, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Keaton & More

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • February 5, 2014 1:00 PM
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  • 9 Comments
Robocop
Every movie should be approached with an open mind. Ideally, be it a film from Martin Scorsese or Friedberg and Seltzer, a reviewer should be going in without expectations, ready to play it as it lays. But it'd be dishonest to pretend that that was the case going in to "RoboCop," because it's a long-delayed remake of Paul Verhoeven's 1980s cult action sci-fi classic that, based at least on early buzz and previews, does without much of what made the original special — the satirical bite, the extreme violence, the hand-crafted effects et al. As such, even the most even-handed person could be forgiven for going in with a heavy heart, especially with the smell of the abysmal "Total Recall" redo still lingering like a fish head behind a radiator.

Benedict Cumberbatch Wants To Be In Gary Oldman's Next Directorial Effort; Says 'Star Wars' Had Nothing To Do With Leaving 'Crimson Peak'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 11, 2013 11:22 AM
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  • 9 Comments
Star Trek Into Darkness, Cumberbatch
In a lengthy profile in The Hollywood Reporter, Benedict Cumberbatch, the man of the hour following his deliciously villainous turn in this summer's blockbuster "Star Trek Into Darkness" and in anticipation of a streak of hotly anticipated fall movies in the form of "The Fifth Estate," "12 Years a Slave," "August: Osage County" and "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug," the British thespian clarified some points regarding his involvement in "Star Wars: Episode VII," including his reasons for leaving Gothic horror movie "Crimson Peak." He also expressed interest in being in the next film directed by Gary Oldman. Weird British character actors have to stick together!

The Future Of American Justice: Watch The New Trailer For The 'RoboCop' Remake, Plus New Photos

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 5, 2013 7:52 PM
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  • 17 Comments
Robocop
Well, here it is… After endless speculation and just as many snarky, internet-based remarks, the trailer for the remake of Paul Verhoeven's satirical masterpiece "RoboCop" is here. And it's… something alright.

Stream This: 'Arbitrage,' 'And While We Were Here,' Gary Oldman In 'State Of Grace' & More On VOD This Week

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • August 16, 2013 3:14 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Happy Friday, streamers! Or, at least, it's a happy Friday for the Internet. As for those multiplexes... well, it's too soon to tell. But since we like to tie our streaming suggestions to the latest releases, here's a quick rundown. We're not sure what to make of "Kick-Ass 2" or "Jobs," and we're definitely not too excited about the star-studded (sigh) Liam Hemsworth vehicle "Paranoia." On the other hand, we are thrilled to suggest an alternate film—little known and highly underrated—starring Gary Oldman. Also a number of older picks, including a music documentary, a cheapo '80s fantasy flick, a major hit from last year, and a Criterion Collection gem from Indian auteur Satyajit Ray. The highly anticipated "Ain't Them Bodies Saints," while opening in theaters, isn't available on VOD yet (tune in next week!), but another indie slated for September is, and we've got the details here. So here we go!

Review: 'Paranoia' Starring Liam Hemsworth, Gary Oldman, Amber Heard and Harrison Ford

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • August 15, 2013 6:00 PM
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  • 2 Comments
We don’t envy makers of techno thrillers. Go too tech-savvy and you lose most people who don’t know anything about technology except that the best way to fix their gadgets is to turn them off and then back on again (guilty). Go too simplistic and there’s no real hook to your story beyond the pretty people and a heart-pounding score. Either extreme also carries the pitfall of being laughed at in a decade or even just a few years. Remember “The Net”? All that said, the bland, boring “Paranoia” does little to distinguish itself and isn’t good (or even enjoyably bad enough) to be passable even as Saturday afternoon cable fodder. And we say this as people who will sit through “Deep Blue Sea” every time it's on.

Keira Knightley Being Pursued For 'Akira' & Gary Oldman Wanted For 'Arthur & Lancelot'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 4, 2011 8:57 AM
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  • 0 Comments
With "Harry Potter" ending this summer, Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy coming to a close in 2012, and "Green Lantern" proving a weak start to the DC heroes that the studio hoped would see them through the next few years, Warner Bros. are branching out a bit in their hunt for future franchises. Their hopes for 2013 might include Superman reboot "Man of Steel" and Spartan sequel "300: Battle of Artemesia," but neither are quite home runs, and they're joined by fresh starters like Guillermo Del Toro's giant monster movie "Pacific Rim" and period witch-hunting flick "The Seventh Son," with Sam Claflin and Jeff Bridges.

Gary Oldman & Helena Bonham Carter Offered Roles In 'Akira' Remake

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 24, 2011 2:01 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Whether you like it or not, Warner Bros' "Akira" remake is now greenlit and moving ahead. With “Unknown” and “Orphan” director Jaume Collet-Serra set to direct and "Tron: Legacy" star Garrett Hedlund ahead of the pack to take on one of the lead roles, it seems the filmmakers are actively looking to cast up the film and are looking to get some big name talent on board. Though this shouldn't be a surprise (more on that in a moment).

Is 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy' About To Become A Franchise? Announcement Allegedly Imminent

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 26, 2011 12:56 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Gary Oldman Says Sequel Could Be A Composite Of 'The Honourable Schoolboy' And 'Smiley's People'It's hard to say that the spy genre doesn't love a franchise. The longest running franchise in cinema history is, of course, the James Bond series, Jason Bourne is Universal's biggest tentpole, and from Harry Palmer to Jack Ryan, if audiences show even a sniff on interest in a character, executives will happily bring them back for future installments, which is why we've had to suffer through things like "xXx2" and "Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London" over the years.

The Amazing Race: In A Star-Filled Year, Who Could Break Out In The Best Actor Category?

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 23, 2011 6:29 AM
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  • 12 Comments
Last week in The Amazing Race, we talked about the films that had gotten a boost for their Best Picture hopes in the Oscar hunt, and those that had taken a hit, after being unveiled in the awards season. To sum it up: good news for "The Descendants," "Moneyball" and "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy," not great news for anyone else. But of course, while Best Picture is the big prize, there are waves and ripples far beyond that, particularly when it comes down to the acting awards.

Venice '11 Review: 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy' Is A Remarkable, Quietly Devastating Spy Movie

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 5, 2011 12:33 PM
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  • 11 Comments
The spy genre, is generally speaking, a euphemism for 'action movie' -- look at the explosions, fistfights and car chases of the Bond films, of the 'Mission: Impossible' series, of the 'Bourne' franchise, none of which have much in the way of actual tradecraft. The business of being a spy is hard, boring work, made up of listening and talking and without a lot of glamor. One of the men who best understands this is novelist John Le Carré, himself a former spy, who for close to half a century has been behind some of the most acclaimed literary examples of the genre. But aside from the much-loved "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold," and the more recent "The Constant Gardener" (the latter not strictly speaking an espionage picture), his works haven't had a huge amount of success on the big screen, lacking the speedboats and fireballs of Ian Fleming or Robert Ludlum. One of the writer's best-known books is "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy," the first of the 'Karla' trilogy, which focuses on George Smiley, a middle-aged veteran of 'The Circus' (Le Carré's term for the British intelligence services) and his rivalry with his Soviet counterpart Karla. Working Title Films has spent the last couple of years on a new cinematic take with Tomas Alfredson, director of the much-acclaimed "Let the Right One In," making his English-language debut at the helm. It's no small undertaking, considering that the novel was previously adapted as a much-loved, seven-part, 290-minute BBC miniseries, headed up by an indelible performance from the great Alec Guinness. Alfredson might have assembled an all-star cast of British talent to bring the book to life, but could the company, led by Gary Oldman taking up Smiley's thick glasses, hope to match their predecessors? And could the film manage to keep the plot coherent and thrilling at a running time less than half of what the TV take had to play with?

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