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Watch: Clips & Trailers From All The Cannes Winners Including 'Blue Is The Warmest Color,' 'The Past,' 'Inside Llewyn Davis' & More

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 28, 2013 11:13 AM
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  • 1 Comment
With the red carpets rolled up, the champagne corked and every available bed now vacant in the south of France, the Croisette is now back to being a hub of the bustling beach resort at least until next May when the frenzy of the Cannes Film Festival descends again. Over the weekend, the prizes were handed out by Steven Spielberg's jury and history was made as director Abdellatif Kechiche and the two lead actresses Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux shared the Palme d'Or for very well-received relationship drama "Blue Is The Warmest Color" (read our rave review here). But it was just one of many films that got honored, including Asghar Farhadi's "The Past," the Coens' "Inside Llewyn Davis," Hirokazu Kore-Eda's "Like Father, Like Son" and many more titles including buzzed-about "Heli," "Blue Ruin," Jia Zhangke's "A Touch Of Sin," and more.

Cannes 2013: 'Blue Is The Warmest Color' Wins Top Palme d'Or Award; Coen Brothers Take Runner-Up Prize

  • By The Playlist
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  • May 26, 2013 1:50 PM
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  • 14 Comments
Abdellatif Kechiche's 'Blue is the Warmest Color', Lea Seydoux
Ten days or so of the annual cinephile orgy that is the Cannes Film Festival draws to a close today, and Steven Spielberg and his jury have decided which movies were the best of heap on the Croisette. It was an interesting year at Cannes in 2013, with American films putting forth a strong showing in all categories, while auteurs ranging from Claire Denis to Jim Jarmusch to Roman Polanski and more all brought their latest works.

Watch: Cannes Clips Including 'Zulu' With Orlando Bloom & Forest Whitaker, Claire Denis' 'Bastards,' Jia Zhangke's 'A Touch of Sin' & More

  • By Edward Davis
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  • May 23, 2013 6:31 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Zulu, Orlando Bloom
To the outsider, the Cannes Film Festival can be a nebulous thing. Even if you know the filmmaker or the cast, sometimes you need more context than a review to give you a sort of firmer grasp of the shape, texture and tone of a movie. Clips from the festival are landing left and right, so we thought we'd grab a smattering and ground you a little deeper than some of the reviews and pictures your may or may not have seen. So here we go.

Cannes Review: 'Heli' A Beautifully Shot But Despairing Look At Corrupted Lives

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 15, 2013 6:42 PM
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  • 5 Comments
"Now you'll get to know God in the land of the damned," a military police officer threatens chillingly midway through "Heli." But this is just further confirmation of where things are going, as the movie makes it clear from the start that it's headed down a bracing path in which neither animals nor children are safe. The film opens in the back of a pickup truck, with a closeup on a boot pressed against a bloody, battered face, mouth duct taped closed, barely showing signs of life. A dead body lies adjacent, and not much is heard except the sound of the engine, as the camera slowly glides from the rear of the truck, up into the front seat, looking out on the open road, in a single, slow methodical shot. The truck stops, the bodies are hauled out, and one is then hanged from a pedestrian overpass that crosses the road. Welcome to "Heli."

Exclusive: Clip & Poster For Cannes Competition Drama 'Heli'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 9, 2013 8:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Today, the Cannes Film Festival revealed the official screening schedule, and this year finds the line-up unusually backloaded, with many of the splashy big titles unspooling in the final days of the fest. And while some may be disappointed (particularly those who weren't planning to stay for the whole fest), it does give the smaller films a better chance to shine and get some attention. One such film that will benefit from a bit more space to spread its wings is Mexican entry "Heli."

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