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Exclusive: 'Ida' Is Forever In Clip From Pawel Pawlikowski's Award Winning Film

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 1, 2014 10:03 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Ida
With awards from TIFF, London Film Festival, the American Society of Cinematographers and more, there's no doubt that "Ida" has been universally adored. But if you're looking for a more personal assessment, be sure to read our review, wherein Jessica Kiang calls it "a small, quiet, polished...thoughtful, artful film." And today, we have an exclusive look at the film, that highlights the controlled beauty Pawel Pawlikowski brings to his film.
More: IDA

Review: Pawel Pawlikowski's Striking, Evocative 'Ida'

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • April 30, 2014 6:35 PM
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  • 0 Comments
From the opening moments of “Ida,” the Polish film from director Pawel Pawlikowski, it’s clear that we’re in for something unusual. Shot in a boxy aspect ratio, in rich, complex black and white, the film isn’t simply stylistically arresting, however; these first few moments find us in a quiet cloister of a Polish convent in the 1960s as a group of novice nuns silently, piously, go about restoring a statue of Christ, returning it to its plinth in the convent’s snowy grounds. This wordless beginning, told in beautifully composed shots, sets the mood for a small, quiet, polished film that unfolds slowly but with remarkable assurance and features a striking central performance from Agata Trzebuchowska. Or rather a striking central performance from Agata Trzebuchowska’s face, because it is her watchful, dark-eyed, unblemished visage, usually framed by a plain gray wimple that is perhaps the film’s most evocative recurring image, even amongst so much truly remarkable cinematography (from neophyte cinematographer Lucasz Zal).

Summer Movie Preview: 40 Most Anticipated Films

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 21, 2014 1:47 PM
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  • 21 Comments
Summer 2014 preview
The temperatures are rising, the coats are going into storage, and the TV spots are getting more prevalent. That's right, it's almost time for summer movie season again. The months of May through August are traditionally the biggest in the multiplex calendar, but the lines have become increasingly blurred in recent years—if "Noah" and "Divergent" didn't kick off blockbuster season, "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" certainly did, and that was three weeks ago.

Watch: Beautiful U.S. Trailer For Pawel Pawlikowski’s 'Ida'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 1, 2014 4:49 PM
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  • 2 Comments
"Absolutely stunning, one of the year's best films," declared our own Oliver Lyttelton (as you'll see below in the new trailer) when he saw Pawel Pawlikowski's "Ida" at the BFI London Film Festival last year. And Jessica Kiang was taken with the movie as well at the Marrakech Film Festival, calling it "thoughtful, artful" filmmaking. Now it's time for everyone else to experience what folks on the festival circuit saw.

Marrakech Review: The Thoughtful, Artful, Award-Winning 'Ida,' From Director Pawel Pawlikowski

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • December 7, 2013 12:04 PM
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  • 1 Comment
From the opening moments of “Ida,” the Polish film from director Pawel Pawlikowski—that plays in competition at the Marrakech Film Festival, but is already trailing awards from TIFF (FIPRESCI critics award) and Warsaw (Grand Prix), having also elicited a rave from our own Oli Lyttelton when he saw it in London—it’s clear that we’re in for something unusual. Shot in a boxy aspect ratio, in rich, complex black and white, the film isn’t simply stylistically arresting, however; these first few moments find us in a quiet cloister of a Polish convent in the 1960s as a group of novice nuns silently, piously, go about restoring a statue of Christ, returning it to its plinth in the convent’s snowy grounds. This wordless beginning, told in beautifully composed shots, sets the mood for a small, quiet, polished film that unfolds slowly but with remarkable assurance and features a striking central performance from Agata Trzebuchowska.

The 5 Best Films Of The 2013 BFI London Film Festival

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 22, 2013 12:14 PM
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  • 1 Comment
With AFI and Rome the only major festivals left in the calendar, the close of the 57th BFI London Film Festival last night with the world premiere of "Saving Mr. Banks" signals the winding down of festival season. I'm starting to just about recover from a twelve-day binge of movies (although thanks to early press screenings and screeners, it actually went on for more like four weeks), but it's not too early to say that, in over ten years of attending the festival (and five as press), this was the best I can remember.

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