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The Playlist

Interview: William Friedkin on ‘Sorcerer,’ The ‘Killer Joe’ TV Show And Life Beyond “Macho Bullsh*t Stories”

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • July 21, 2014 2:05 PM
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  • 2 Comments
At 78, William Friedkin is experiencing a new lease on life, career-wise. When we spoke with the genial, anecdote-laden, Oscar-winning director at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, he let drop that he's in contention, at least, for what has to be one of the choicest TV gigs on offer: season 2 of “True Detective,” or part thereof.

Interviews: Mike Cahill & Michael Pitt Reflect On Science Vs. Faith In 'I Origins'

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • July 18, 2014 3:02 PM
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I Origins
When “Another Earth” premiered at Sundance three years ago, the quiet, otherworldly drama made quite a splash with critics and audiences alike. First-time director Mike Cahill’s talents were obvious—even on a low budget—and lead actress (and co-writer) Brit Marling was a breakout star.

Interview: Michel Gondry On ‘Mood Indigo,’ Fancy Props, And The Future Of Stop-Motion Animation

  • By Alex Suskind
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  • July 16, 2014 3:24 PM
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Michel Gondry’s newest movie, “Mood Indigo” (based on the legendary French novel by Boris Vian), is filled with many of the same fantastical and emotional tropes that have been splashed throughout his filmography: cloud rides over France, cars made of see-through panels, a piano that produces cocktails (fittingly called a Pianocktail). There’s also the familiar romantic approach––a budding relationship between two individuals (Romain Duris and Audrey Tatou) that reaches the manic highs and depressing lows we’ve all come to experience at some point in our lives.

Interview: Richard Linklater Examines 'Boyhood,' Memory, Time & Perspective

  • By Sam Adams
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  • July 15, 2014 11:36 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Boyhood
Richard Linklater says making "Boyhood" was "unlike any film ever," and it's hard to disagree with him. Plenty of movies have spent more than a decade stuck in turnaround, but there's nothing in the history of fiction film to match the unique process of "Boyhood," shooting several days each year for 12 years and then turning the results into a poetic and deeply moving look at how time changes us in ways we both do and don't see (If the title weren't already taken, "Boyhood" could easily have been called "Life Itself.") Since its late-breaking debut at Sundance, Linklater's sprawling but intimate story has been met with near-universal praise, and continued a winning streak that, after "Bernie" and "Before Midnight," is rivaled only by the early threepeat of "Slacker," "Dazed and Confused" and "Before Sunrise."

Interview: Director Matt Reeves Explores The "Anatomy Of Violence" In ‘Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes’

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 14, 2014 1:03 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Dawn of the Planet Of the Apes
Tribalism, the rise and fall of civilizations, broken brotherhoods and the tragic failure to coexist: these are not the familiar ingredients for a summer tentpole movie. And yet here they are in Matt Reeves’ well-considered, thoughtful and morally complex, “Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes,” a summer blockbuster that considers a lot of ambitious ideas, successfully arranges them and yet never at the expense of scope, spectacle and drama. We could probably see hundreds of blockbusters like these and not get tired of them. They are every reason we go to the movies: for escapism, but also to have a piece of art reflect back a little piece of humanity back at us. And Reeves' movie does that in spades.

Interview: Bong Joon-Ho Talks ‘Snowpiercer' & Why The Stories About Harvey Weinstein Conflict Are Wrong

  • By Alex Suskind
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  • June 26, 2014 12:25 PM
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Snowpiercer
Before the critical praise, the overseas box office success, and the rumored infighting between director Bong Joon-ho and studio head Harvey Weinstein, the film “Snowpiercer” was a graphic novel. Called “La Transperceneige,” it focused on a post-apocalyptic world, one filled with class warfare, political strife, and global warming, all set on a train carrying the last humans on earth.

‘Obvious Child’ Director Gillian Robespierre & Jenny Slate Talk Boundaries In Comedy, Naturalism, Improv, More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • June 19, 2014 12:15 PM
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Obvious Child, With Jenny Slate, Gabe Liedman and Gillian Robespierre.
Razor-sharp writing, taut direction, and a stellar central performance by Jenny Slate anchor Gillian Robespierre’s debut directorial feature “Obvious Child.” You’ve likely heard otherwise, its treatment of abortion dominating conversation and even the film’s promotional material, but while Robespierre wanted to buck convention with her narrative aims, she recognizes why the safer romantic comedy choices exist. “I watched those kind of films recently, and they’re still entertaining. We just wanted to tell the other side,” she says about the film, which follows New York stand-up comic Donna (Slate) as she discovers she’s pregnant after a drunken one-night-stand.

'The Rover' Director David Michôd On Robert Pattinson, Guy Pearce & How We're "Hurtling Toward Oblivion"

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • June 11, 2014 1:29 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Bone-dry, brutal and so slender it’s almost emaciated, Australian director David Michôd’s second feature, after his terrific debut “Animal Kingdom,” premiered in Cannes to high anticipation and ultimately mixed reviews. We ourselves really liked “The Rover,” which stars Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson as unlikely companions on a bleak road trip across as collapsed and exhausted near-future Australia (review here) but can understand how Michôd’s vision of a hellish ruined world, in which the first luxury to disappear is human kindness, might have proven simply too unrelentingly bleak for some; it’s the type of film into whose deliberately empty spaces one can read everything, or nothing at all.

Interview: Dakota Fanning Talks ‘Night Moves,’ Working With Kelly Reichardt, Spielberg, Tony Scott & More

  • By Sam Adams
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  • May 29, 2014 4:01 PM
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  • 0 Comments
If you go into Kelly Reichardt's “Night Moves” cold, or knowing only that it's a drama about ecoterrorism from the director of “Meek's Cutoff” and “Wendy & Lucy,” you might wonder about her leading actress, a mousy, moon-faced brunette whose occasionally eerie stillness reflects both her character's implacable dedication to the cause and her failure to look beneath the surface of her beliefs. When I saw the movie at Toronto last fall, I didn't realize until the end credits I'd been watching Dakota Fanning the entire time. As she did with Michelle Williams, whom Fanning calls one of her favorite actresses, Reichardt peels away Fanning's youthful precocity to find an engrossing stillness underneath -- or rather, she got out of the way and let Fanning do it to herself.

Interview: 'Wolf Creek 2' Director Greg McLean On Development, Working With Blumhouse, And Quentin Tarantino

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • May 17, 2014 7:35 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Wolf Creek 2
This weekend, a wonderful alternative to the overblown thrills of the Hollywood mega-blockbusters comes in the form of director Greg McLean's "Wolf Creek 2," a down-and-dirty thriller from Australia that continues the exploits of Mick Taylor (John Jarratt), a serial killer from 2005's outback-set original, who has a seriously bad case of xenophobia (we had a more enthusiastic response than our reviewer). A few weeks ago, on the eve of production on his new project for Blumhouse, "6 Miranda Drive" (starring Kevin Bacon and Ming-Na Wen), we got to chat with McLean about why it took so long, the development of the screenplay, whether or not Quentin Tarantino has seen the sequel yet and what it's like working with Blumhouse on the new project.

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