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The Playlist

Interview: 'Wolf Creek 2' Director Greg McLean On Development, Working With Blumhouse, And Quentin Tarantino

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • May 17, 2014 7:35 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Wolf Creek 2
This weekend, a wonderful alternative to the overblown thrills of the Hollywood mega-blockbusters comes in the form of director Greg McLean's "Wolf Creek 2," a down-and-dirty thriller from Australia that continues the exploits of Mick Taylor (John Jarratt), a serial killer from 2005's outback-set original, who has a seriously bad case of xenophobia (we had a more enthusiastic response than our reviewer). A few weeks ago, on the eve of production on his new project for Blumhouse, "6 Miranda Drive" (starring Kevin Bacon and Ming-Na Wen), we got to chat with McLean about why it took so long, the development of the screenplay, whether or not Quentin Tarantino has seen the sequel yet and what it's like working with Blumhouse on the new project.

Tribeca Interview: Billy Crudup Compares 'Glass Chin' To 'Watchmen,' Wants Role In 'Star Wars 7'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 30, 2014 6:07 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Glass Chin
One of the absolute highlights of this year's unusually robust Tribeca Film Festival was Noah Buschel's "Glass Chin" (read our review here). It's the tale of a down on his luck former boxer named Bud (played by Corey Stoll) who gets seduced by the criminal underworld. And there's no one more seductive than Billy Crudup, who plays J.J., a kind of loan shark/restaurateur, in a performance that borders on being downright mesmerizing. Crudup is a wonderful actor but in "Glass Chin" he taps into something really powerful and odd. And we were lucky enough to chat with him about the process of creating the character, which he equates to the experience making Zack Snyder's "Watchmen." Oh, and he gets a shout out J.J. Abrams for a "Star Wars" job too.

Interview: Tom Hardy & Steven Knight Discuss Their One-Man Gamble In The Risky, Mesmerizing ‘Locke’

  • April 24, 2014 11:29 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Locke
Tom Hardy has defined his career by playing very distinct and willfully hard-as-nails men. His breakthrough came in portraying a sociopathic prison inmate in “Bronson,” then came a flamboyant dream criminal in “Inception,” a taciturn bootlegger in “Lawless,” an intractable UFC pugilist in “Warrior,” a dogmatic terrorist in “The Dark Knight Rises” and he’s about to play the iconic wasteland traveler that Mel Gibson made famous in “Mad Max: Fury Road” next year.

Interview: Jim Jarmusch Talks The Vampiric Charms Of ‘Only Lovers Left Alive’ & Proposing To Muse Tilda Swinton

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • April 10, 2014 1:00 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Only Lovers Left Alive
Iconoclastic filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has been living outside of the mainstream for his entire career, so it’s perhaps only fitting that for his 11th feature-length film, “Only Lovers Left Alive,” the writer/director turns his attentions to the outsiders that live in shadows.

Interview: Jonathan Glazer Burrows 'Under The Skin' With Scarlett Johansson For A Haunting Experience

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 4, 2014 1:20 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Jonathan Glazer, Under The Skin
It has been close to a decade since commercial and music video director-turned-filmmaker Jonathan Glazer released his sophomore feature film, “Birth.” Following his slick and stylish debut, the gangster flick “Sexy Beast,” marked a leap forward stylistically, with longer takes, a bold visual approach and a carefully considered integration of narrative and score. And now with his third film, “Under The Skin” (our review) Glazer has again pushed the language of his filmmaking into bold and truly exciting places. (Indeed, check out our 5 Reasons Why It's One Of The Best Films Of The Year).

Interview: 'Go Down Death' Director Aaron Schimberg Talks Structure, Reviews, And 'The Da Vinci Code'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • March 27, 2014 4:23 PM
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Fever dreams can be scarring. However, if you’re filmmaker Aaron Schimberg, you can take that harrowing dip into the subconscious and make it into the fine, singular work “Go Down Death.” His debut film follows a few lives in a desolate village ravaged by constant bombing and unending trauma, changing character perspectives frequently -- ranging from a child gravedigger to a disfigured gambler -- but always maintaining its utter strangeness. It’s also sort of an anomaly in the independent scene, having been shot on 16mm black & white and utilizing both sets and scale models. We saw it last year and raved about it, claiming it “will trouble and beguile the subconscious long after you’ve moved on.”

Interview: Denis Villeneuve Talks Shooting Toronto For 'Enemy,' Dipping Into The Subconscious & His Next Projects

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 20, 2014 12:01 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Enemy, Denis Villeneuve
A cinematic puzzle that dives deep into the realm of the subconscious, Denis Villeneuve's "Enemy" blurs reality with absurdity, surreality and sometimes, straight up WTF excursions into the strange. But his film is not coy provocation, nor does it simply circumvent traditional narrative routes as a parlor trick. Instead, across 90 tight, captivating minutes, Villeneuve takes viewers into a crumbling relationship, and the portrait of a man torn between two women, weighing responsibility against desire.

Interview: Kate Lyn Sheil & John Gallagher Jr., Navigate Tech-Dating & Obsession In 'The Heart Machine'

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 13, 2014 4:46 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Part of the pleasure of attending an established film festival like South By Southwest is the caliber of emerging talent it attracts: when you’re seeing a new director’s feature debut, you can rest (reasonably) assured that the cream of the submissions pile has risen to the top. Such is the case with Zachary Wigon’s first film, “The Heart Machine.” Starring John Gallagher, Jr. (“The Newsroom” and last year’s SXSW breakout, “Short Term 12”) and Kate Lyn Sheil (an indie darling who recently appeared in season two of “House of Cards”), the film explores the technological implications of the current dating climate, where sex-with-no-strings is available at the touch of an app, yet intimacy can be kept safely at bay via one’s computer screen.

Interview: Director Lenny Abrahamson on Michael Fassbender’s Giant Head, Faking SXSW in 'Frank' & More

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 12, 2014 4:05 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Frank, Fassbender
Obscuring the terrifically expressive and sometimes terrifying (“12 Years a Slave”) face of actor Michael Fassbender may seem like sacrilege, but that’s just what director Lenny Abrahamson (“What Richard Did”) does in “Frank,” a film that premiered atSundance but is—appropriately, for reasons that will be explained—also playing this week at South By Southwest. Screenwriters Jon Ronson (“The Men Who Stare at Goats”) and Peter Straughan (“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”) have expanded on a memoir by Ronson to create a wholly unique, comi-tragic portrait of one band’s evolution.

Interview: Robert Duvall’s Still Got It In “A Night In Old Mexico”

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • March 11, 2014 5:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
A Night In Old Mexico
It’s no surprise that Robert Duvall is a cantankerous (and charming) old coot in his new film, “A Night in Old Mexico,” helmed by the Spanish director and composer Emilio Aragón. The 83-year-old is still in fine and feisty form as Red Bovie, an old cowboy forced off his land by developers turning the area into sad excuses for “ranchettes.” Rather than live out his days in a trailer home, Red takes off for a Mexican border town with Gally (Jeremy Irvine, “War Horse”), the cowboy-wannabe grandson he has only just met due to a 40-year estrangement with his only son.

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