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The Playlist

Ron Fricke & Mark Magidson Discuss Using Both 70mm & Digital In Their Gorgeous Experimental Doc 'Samsara'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • August 24, 2012 10:57 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Cinematic poetry can be scoffed at, labeled pretentious, and thoroughly dismissed without a second thought. But somehow, Ron Fricke’s “Baraka,” a “non-verbal documentary” that uses time-lapse photography and impressionable ambulatory cinematography to chart the human race through more than twenty countries managed to move even those who hold the “art-film” label with serious vehemence. The film is one of a handful of documentaries that favor visual tone over language (with absolutely no interviews or narration), a small clique that includes Godfrey Reggio’s “Qatsi Trilogy” to Fricke’s own short-form “Chronos.” They don’t come around often -- and aside from researching and trekking all over the world, we can only assume they’re difficult to finance due to their nature -- but when they do, cinema-goers can be assured they’re in for something exceptionally unique.

Exclusive: Tony Gilroy Pulls The Curtain Back On The Secretive 'The Bourne Legacy'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 20, 2012 12:08 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Tony Gilroy has a mini-armada at his disposal. In June of 2012, in an unassuming block of offices in midtown Manhattan, the writer/director is sequestered with a team of editors orchestrating the next installment of Universal’s lucrative ‘Bourne’ franchise, which grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwide theatrically and a surfeit more from DVD and omnipresent cable appearances. But Gilroy -- who was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay in 2007 for "Michael Clayton," and is the author of all three original ‘Bourne’ scripts -- isn’t simply mounting a reboot or a reimagining, or conducting a linear sequel. Instead, the filmmaker is attempting to pull off a feat rarely attempted with Hollywood tentpoles: a parallel circumnavigation of the familiar ‘Bourne’ narrative told through the eyes of another agent.

Cannes: Guy Pearce Talks Playing Camp & Shaving His Eyebrows In 'Lawless'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 25, 2012 11:01 AM
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  • 4 Comments
It takes a fair amount of talent to appear in a film alongside practiced scene-stealers like Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Jessica Chastain, Mia Wasikowska, Jason Clarke and Shia LaBeouf. But of course, as audiences have been aware of for getting on two decades, since he came to attention in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert," Guy Pearce is possessed of an unusual amount of talent.

Cannes: Andrew Dominik On The Violence, Politics & Look Of 'Killing Them Softly' With Brad Pitt

  • By Aaron Hillis
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  • May 24, 2012 2:19 PM
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  • 2 Comments
In what turned out to be a banner year for the movies, "The Assassination of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford" ended up somewhat overshadowed. As fellow neo-Westerns "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country For Old Men" swept up plaudits and Oscars, the picture, the second by Australian director Andrew Dominik, received some raves, but plenty of negative notices too, and it ended up making a miniscule amount at the box office. But by decade's end, many had since rediscovered the picture as one of the finest of the 00s, and as such, Dominik's first film since, crime tale "Killing Them Softly," was one of the most eagerly anticipated pictures of the Cannes film festival this year.

The Playlist Interview From Cannes: Wes Anderson Discusses The Nostalgia, Music, & Making Of 'Moonrise Kingdom'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 23, 2012 12:31 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Few filmmakers have a more distinctive take on the world than Wes Anderson. Many of his contemporaries -- David O Russell, Darren Aronofsky, Spike Jonze et al -- are extraordinary filmmakers, but it's only with Anderson that you can look at a single frame -- any frame -- and instantly know that it's his. And the same is true of his latest, "Moonrise Kingdom," which marks his return to live-action filmmaking for the first time in five years.

Cannes: Michel Gondry Talks The Inspirations Behind 'The We And The I,' & Talks Criterion Appearance On 'Malkovich'

  • By The Playlist
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  • May 22, 2012 4:35 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Perhaps once regarded as a quirky, whimsical visualist known for his eye-popping music videos (Bjork, Beck, White Stripes) and his often pop-surrealist indie films ("Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind," "The Science of Sleep"), French filmmaker Michel Gondry has really challenged the boilerplate concept of who he is as an artist in recent years. He's taken on a tentpole super-hero film ("The Green Hornet" starring Seth Rogen), made a stylistically unadorned and deeply personal, yet unsentimental documentary about his aunt ("The Thorn In The Side") and another superficially quirky mainstream comedy that's actually quite the sincere and tribute to the joys of community ("Be Kind Rewind").

Interview: Maïwenn Talks The Research And Multiple Cuts Of 'Polisse'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • May 17, 2012 6:50 PM
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  • 1 Comment
After playing the victim in '70s horror throwback "High Tension" and directing the comparatively light dramedy "Actress' Ball," French thespian/filmmaker Maïwenn yearned for something a bit more serious. So what better topic to tackle than one focusing on France's Child Protection Unit (CPU)?

Interview: 'Elena' Director Andrei Zvyagintsev Talks Changed Ending, Favorite Filmmakers

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • May 17, 2012 5:45 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Cinephiles, unite! The name Andrei Zvyagintsev is relatively unknown on these shores, as his remarkable debut "The Return" quietly came and went (though it is now on Netflix Instant -- GO!) and his tremendous sophomore effort "The Banishment" never saw a proper release in the West. That's all about to change with "Elena," his third and most refined piece of work, which not only saw a premiere at Cannes Film Festival but also left with the Un Certain Regard Jury Prize. Zvyagintsev's aesthetic might make him seem like Andrei Tarkovsky II, but his voice is still his own, eschewing his mentor's liberal use of magic for more grounded, realistic stories.

Guy Pearce Talks Doing His Own Stunts In 'Lockout' & Hints At The Mysteries of 'Prometheus'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 12, 2012 2:57 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Audiences have a strong awareness of Guy Pearce, but are they ready to see him as an action hero? In “Lockout,” Pearce plays disgraced special agent Snow, forced on a suicide mission to rescue the President’s daughter from a riot happening outside of the Earth’s atmosphere, in the middle of a dangerous space prison. But while Pearce’s wisecracking Snow gives and receives his share of punches, the actor wasn’t entirely certain at first that this would be an action-heavy role.

Interview: 'Tent City USA' Director Steven Cantor Talks His Process, Documentary Storytelling & The Homelessness Issue

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • April 5, 2012 3:38 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Premiering on OWN on Thursday night, “Tent City USA” documents the lives of a group of homeless people in Nashville and the trials and tribulations they face in their quest to finds homes and a community, no matter how one might conceive of it. Executive producer Gabriel Byrne spearheaded the project, produced exclusively for OWN, who are now branching out into documentary production for the channel in addition to broadcasting festival hits. Byrne brought on noted documentary filmmaker Steven Cantor (“Devil’s Playground,” “loudQUIETloud: A Film About the Pixies”) to bring the story to life.

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