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Diane Kruger On 'Farewell, My Queen,' The Value Of Beauty In Hollywood & Finding A Leopard In Her Shower

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 22, 2012 11:56 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Having followed what has become a fairly well-trodden path from modelling into acting, Diane Kruger seems determined to ensure that her career is more diverse and challenging than that label might suggest. In this endeavor she is undoubtedly helped by being fluent in German, French and English, meaning she can pursue roles in all three languages, and critically, for her, be part of the French cinema that she loves: "...there's a poetry to it, for me it’s what makes me dream...the kind of movies that I could [watch and then] die and go to heaven."

Watch: Trailer For SXSW & Berlin Pic 'Electrick Children' & A Quick Chat With Star Julia Garner

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 22, 2012 10:02 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Seeming even younger than her 18 years, Julia Garner, the lead in Rebecca Thomas' debut feature "Electrick Children" (reviewed here) delivers one of those performances that marks a new star in the ascendant. Juggling upcoming roles and sweetly new to the world of press junkets and promotion, we spoke briefly with Garner at the Berlin Film Festival where the film played to a very warm reception on the opening night of the Generation Section.

Melissa Leo Talks 'Francine,' The "Sacred Territory" Of Acting & What She's Looking At Next

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 21, 2012 11:55 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Having experienced something of a mid-career breakout with her Oscar-winning supporting role in "The Fighter," Melissa Leo's name has fast become something of a hallmark of quality. Recently she has lent her talents for startlingly authentic portrayals to the likes of "Treme," "Mildred Pierce" and Kevin Smith's "Red State," but in the Berlin Film Festival favorite "Francine" (our review is here) she lands a rare leading role in a feature, albeit a small, narrowly focused one.

Billy Bob Thornton On 'Jayne Mansfield's Car': The Major Change He Made In The Edit, '60s Muscle Cars And More

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • February 21, 2012 9:57 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Contrary to his fearsomely eccentric reputation, we are happy to report that in person, writer/director/actor Billy Bob Thornton is a charmer. Attending The Berlin Film Festival for the premiere of his first directorial outing in over a decade "Jayne Mansfield's Car" (you can read our review here), he won over press left and right with his mixture of soft-spoken Southern gentlemanliness, and frank rebuttals of some of the more outre rumours that have dogged him throughout his career.

McG Discusses The Alternate Endings To 'This Means War' & The (Jokey) "Homoerotic Finish" You'll Get On DVD

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • February 17, 2012 5:44 PM
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This weekend, Fox's ambitious blend of action, comedy and romance, "This Means War," rolls into theaters starring Chris Pine and Tom Hardy as warring CIA agents at each others' throats vying for the attentions of Reese Witherspoon. With the picture now finished and screenings beginning to roll out across the country, we got a chance to catch up with director McG and talk about the film. What intrigued us most was the end of 'War,' with the helmer telling Movieline that initially he thought about doing a "Clue"-style ending. The 1985 film had three different endings shot, and shipped to theaters, with audiences never knowing what they would get. While McG abandoned that idea, without spoiling anything, we'll say the version of "This Mean's War" that moviegoers see in theaters wasn't the only one under consideration.

Director Josh Trank Discusses His Found-Footage Film 'Chronicle' & His Concerns About Doing A Sequel

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • February 16, 2012 3:54 PM
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You've wowed Hollywood with your daring, genre-defying action film. You've got the critics on your side. You made the film on a tiny budget. And now, you've got a hit. What do you do next? Most would pursue the sequel route, particularly with something like "Chronicle," the found-footage drama revolving around three superpowered teens. But twenty-six-year-old director Josh Trank isn't exactly sure he wants to go down that path.

Mark Neveldine & Brian Taylor Talk African Tribal Dancing, Mimicking Pink Floyd & Making 'Ghost Rider: Spirit Of Vengeance'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • February 15, 2012 2:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Coming from the grimier, gonzo world of "Crank," it was something of a surprise to see directors Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor take the helm of Sony blockbuster "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance." While the first film was a $228 million hit, Sony definitely wanted to take this prospective franchise in a different direction. And fortunately for the hands-on duo, who also shoot all their second unit footage themselves, they were given free reign by Marvel Studios to put their stamp on the film.

"The World & The Industry Will Move On": Steven Soderbergh On His Retirement, 'Magic Mike' & 'Side Effects'

  • By The Playlist
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  • January 18, 2012 12:20 PM
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  • 6 Comments
For the last couple of years, Steven Soderbergh, one of the most acclaimed filmmakers of the last few decades, started to talk about retirement. Initially dismissed as a joke, the ambiguity played up by the director, it's become increasingly clear that Soderbergh is serious about the proposition.

Tran Anh Hung Talks His "Deep Spiritual Connection" With 'Norwegian Wood,' Says His Next Film Will Be His French Language Debut

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • January 5, 2012 11:04 AM
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Bold is the filmmaker who would tackle the prose of cult novelist Haruki Murakami. Though Jun Ichikawa found success adapting the short story "Tony Takitani," most of Murakami's work is desolate and blackly humorous, centered on characters struggling with loneliness in a politically-troubled, often surreal world. That didn't stop Tran Anh Hung, the director of "The Scent Of Green Papaya," who brings us his long-in-the-works adaptation of the moody novel "Norwegian Wood."

Stephen Daldry Talks Asperger's, Depicting 9/11 In 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,' And The Oscars

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • December 20, 2011 12:30 PM
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  • 3 Comments
At present, up to the imminent release of “Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close,” Stephen Daldry is three-for-three in terms of films to Best Director Oscar nominations; there’s clearly something about the stories he tells hitting a nerve among Academy voters, no matter how challenging (“The Hours”) or even controversial (“The Reader”) his subject matter. 'Extremely Loud' suggests that he’s as interested as ever in posing hard questions and finding powerful answers, as he brings to life Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel about a child with Asperger’s who takes an extraordinary journey to come to terms with the death of his father during 9/11.

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