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The Playlist

Christoph Waltz Talks Working With Roman Polanski & Playing The "Smuggest Character Ever" In 'Carnage'

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • December 12, 2011 2:35 PM
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Although Christoph Waltz has been working as an actor since the early 1980’s, he was relatively unknown to American audiences before his Academy Award-winning performance as Hans Landa in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglorious Basterds.” Waltz’s elevated status catapulted him into a string of Hollywood releases in 2011 that including “The Green Hornet,” “Water for Elephants” and “The Three Musketeers.” But it is Waltz’s smallest role, as Alan Cowan in Roman Polanski’s “Carnage,” for which the actor is drawing his greatest acclaim since ‘Basterds.’

Colin Firth Says That The Filmmakers Struggled To Cut 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy' Down From Three-And-A-Half Hours

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • December 6, 2011 1:59 PM
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  • 0 Comments

David Cronenberg Says 'A Dangerous Method' Was Originally Intended For Julia Roberts

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 22, 2011 3:17 PM
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  • 2 Comments

'The Descendants' Star Shailene Woodley Discusses Working With George Clooney & "Riding The Wave" Of Show Business

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • November 17, 2011 12:23 PM
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  • 0 Comments

Werner Herzog Talks Teaching Lock-Picking, Being A Living Legend And 'Into The Abyss'

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • November 14, 2011 11:03 AM
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There are few filmmakers who have become as legendary – literally – as Werner Herzog. He’s not just the creator of dozens of ambitious, wildly different, incredibly accomplished films; he’s a guy who got shot while conducting an interview on camera, and then just a few days later pulled Joaquin Phoenix out of a car after an accident. Herzog has become as mythic as not just the characters in his movies, but the movies themselves, where fact and fiction merge into an awe-inspiring whole. Ironically, his latest film “Into the Abyss” feels incredibly small, intimate, and painfully real; interviewing two young men from Texas who committed a brutal crime, Herzog examines capital punishment as an incidental component of humanizing two men we might otherwise call monsters.

LFF '11: Gerardo Naranjo On Innocence, The Genesis Of 'Miss Bala' And 'Intelligent Action Movies'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 28, 2011 5:48 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Plus, More From The Director And The Film's Star Stephanie SigmanAside from Steven Soderbergh's "Traffic" over a decade ago, there haven't been a lot of decent movies focusing on the drug trade just over the border. Sure, the cartels crop up from time to time, but mostly in villains in dumb action movies, but it feels like quite a while since we've had a really smart, incisive look at that terrifying world.

LFF '11: Felicity Jones Says Her Performance In 'Like Crazy' Was Influenced By 'Breaking The Waves'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 27, 2011 7:59 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Rising U.K. Star & Sundance Breakout Actress Wants To Play A Superhero Or A SnakeHow's your 2011 been? Pretty good? Even so, we bet you've not had as good a year as Felicity Jones is having. The 27-year-old Brit has been working away for over ten years, starting with kids' TV favorite "The Worst Witch" and long-running radio drama "The Archers," with more recent roles on both the small screen ("Doctor Who," "Northanger Abbey") and the big ("Cheri," "Brideshead Revisited," "The Tempest"), but she's headed into the stratosphere in the last twelve months.

LFF '11: Drake Doremus Says He Shot 'Like Crazy' For $250,000 On A $1,500 Still Camera

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 26, 2011 10:04 AM
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  • 5 Comments
And More We Learned From The Director Of The Sundance Award-Winning Romance The Sundance Grand Jury Prize is traditionally something of a kiss of death for an indie, in terms of gaining a wider audience. Irrespective of the quality of the film, the likes of "Girls Town," "Sunday," "Three Seasons," "Slam," "Forty Shades of Blue," "Quinceanera" and "Padre Nuestro" never really set the world alight, did they? But things have changed in recent years, with the last two winners, "Precious" and "Winter's Bone," both picking up Best Picture Academy Award nominations, and this year's victorious movie has just as good a good chance at crossing over to a more mainstream audience

'Attack the Block' Director Joe Cornish Says Basement Jaxx "Nailed" The Mood He Was Going For

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • October 25, 2011 8:29 AM
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  • 3 Comments
And More From The Director On The Alien Invasion Film From the moment the lights dimmed in the Alamo Drafthouse where we first saw Joe Cornish's comedic sci-fi thriller "Attack the Block" at this year's SXSW film festival, we were hooked. Since then, we've watched as the film has gone through wild ups-and-downs: first the rapturous response in Austin (where it ended up taking home an Audience Award), to its acquisition by Sony's Screen Gems division, to the somewhat limited theatrical release it got this summer. It felt very much like those that saw "Attack the Block" absolutely adored it… it's just that not many people saw it.

Andrew Eaton Says U.S. Version Of 'The Trip' Without Steve Coogan & Rob Brydon Could Be On The Way

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • October 25, 2011 7:14 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Plus Updates On Michael Winterbottom Projects 'The Promised Land,' 'Bailout,' 'Seven Days' And 'Paul Raymond's Wonderful World Of Erotica' Relationships are key in the filmmaking world, particularly in terms of actually getting the damn things made, and it's no surprise that many of the most successful filmmakers are ones with long-running close partnerships with producers. One of the closest today is that between eclectic filmmaker Michael Winterbottom and his long-term producing partner Andrew Eaton. The pair first worked together on the 1994 TV series "Family," founding Revolution Films together around the same time, and have made a film almost every year.

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