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Interview: Joel Edgerton Talks Playing A Nice Tough Guy In 'Warrior'

  • By Leah Zak
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  • September 6, 2011 7:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Also Has No Reservations About Tackling Tom Buchanan In Baz Luhrmann's 'The Great Gatsby'Swinging and punching its way into theaters this weekend is “Warrior,” a tale of two estranged brothers who find themselves reunited in the MMA (that is, Mixed Martial Arts) ring. As to be expected, much of the screentime of the two leads, Joel Edgerton (playing the older brother, Brendan) and Tom Hardy (as the younger, Tommy), involves skillfully busting their co-stars up as they make their way through the ranks of a championship tournament to eventually face one another for the ultimate prize: a very large check both could use. We recently had the chance to sit down with Edgerton and talk about playing a big guy with a big heart, as well as the preparation it took to go up against his co-stars, who (besides himself and Hardy) were all MMA fighters professionally.

Renny Harlin Talks The Politics Of '5 Days Of War,' Says He Wants To Make 'Long Kiss Goodnight 2'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • August 19, 2011 3:27 AM
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  • 3 Comments
It’s been quite a journey for Finnish filmmaker Renny Harlin. Once the director of “A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master ” (the highest-grossing entry in the series at the time) he moved on to the back-to-back onslaught of “The Adventures Of Ford Farlaine” and “Die Hard 2: Die Harder” that cemented him as one of Hollywood’s top action directors, a designation he carried all the way to the snakebitten “Cutthroat Island,” one of the biggest bombs in box office history.

Anne Hathaway Explains How Bon Iver & Dirty Projectors Helped Her Land The Lead In 'One Day'

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • August 18, 2011 2:19 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The Influence Of 'Once Upon A Time In America' & More From Lone Scherfig & Jim Sturgess About The FilmThere’s the average romantic comedy with the meet cute or initial hatred between the inevitable lovers, and then there’s “One Day.” Rather than featuring a traditional love story narrative, set over days, weeks, or even months, “One Day” visits Emma (Anne Hathaway) and Dexter (Jim Sturgess) on July 15 every year, starting in the ‘80s. The audience gets a glimpse of where they are--and where they are in relation to each other--each year on that day, creating 23 mini-films in one. They’re friends who are constantly bordering on being much more, even as others enter their lives.

John Sayles Talks The Politics Of 'Amigo' & Working With A Filipino Cast

  • By Mark Zhuravsky
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  • August 17, 2011 11:30 AM
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  • 1 Comment
John Sayles' latest feature, "Amigo," is an intriguing moral fable, marrying historical narrative with a fictionalized tale that takes us on an emotional journey with those on both sides of a conflict. The background is the Philippine–American War of the early 20th century, a well-documented but not widely known (it certainly was skimmed over in our history classes) attempt to "win hearts and minds" of Filipinos. The "amigo" of the title refers to Rafael (Joel Torre), a cabeza (head) of a barrio whose initially envious position becomes his downfall when the Americans unceremoniously occupy the village and attempt to root out guerilla fighters who have taken refuge in the adjacent wilderness. Rafael's brother is the leader of the local insurrection and so the village head finds himself in the ultimate predicament, pacifying the trigger-happy Americans while half-heartedly supporting his brother's revolutionary tactics. "Amigo" succeeds largely because it refuses to simplify the situation or spell out the obvious comparisons a viewer could make to U.S. global politics today. It's also well-acted, handsomely shot with rich scenery and a novelistic approach to character development. In short, it's another fine entry in Sayles' already impressive body of work and should more than please fans of the auteur.

Craig Gillespie Says He Was Attracted To The "Brutal" Vampire Mythology Of ‘Fright Night’

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • August 17, 2011 11:07 AM
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Despite his art house pedigree, “Lars and the Real Girl” director Craig Gillespie -- who will tackle "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" next -- is diving into the genre world head first. This week he attempts to satiate the horror crowd with a remake of ‘80s camp classic “Fright Night” that he hopes will bring back the “ruthless vampire” from the depths of lovey-dovey romanticism like “Twilight.” Starring Colin Farrell, Anton Yelchin, David Tennant, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and Imogen Poots, the film keeps the basic premise but adds a darker edge to the proceedings while relocating the story to Las Vegas. Add in some 3D and you have a unique, updated genre tale that aims to take a real bite out of some familiar cinematic territory.

Imogen Poots Says Colin Farrell Brings A "Slick Sexuality" To His Vampire In 'Fright Night'

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • August 15, 2011 11:29 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Here at The Playlist, we’ve been singing the praises of British actress Imogen Poots for a while now. She impressed in Jordan Scott’s boarding school drama “Cracked” and David Levien’s “Solitary Man,” and has been building her presence over the years, with smaller roles in “V for Vendetta,” “28 Weeks Later” and “Me and Orson Welles.” At the close of 2010, The Playlist listed Poots as one of our 15 actresses on the rise, and indeed with roles coming up in the biopic "Greetings From Tim Buckley," the drama "A Late Quartet" (alongside Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener and more) and the romance/heist flick "Comes A Bright Day" with "Submarine" star Craig Roberts, she's definitely living up to her early promise.

John Sayles Looking To Direct Own Script Based On The Rosenberg Trial

  • By Mark Zhuravsky
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  • August 15, 2011 10:58 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Talks Demise Of The HBO Satchmo Miniseries, 'Girls Like Us,' And MoreJohn Sayles is a busy man, a prolific screenwriter and icon of the American independent film movement. Having made his name directing films such “Eight Men Out,” “Matewan,” “The Return of the Secaucus Seven,” "Lone Star," "Sunshine State," and a variety of small but frequently warmly received films, Sayles also made his mark as an occasional Hollywood scribe, most recently co-writing "The Spiderwick Chronicles". With his latest, "Amigo" (our reviewer at TIFF '10 called it "a complex and organically built work that coaxes meaning out of the situations it builds rather than putting the politics first and constructing a story around it"), a look at the Philippine–American War of early 1900s, opening this week, we had an opportunity to talk with the writer/director and had a chance to ask him about the wide variety of projects he has on his slate and here's what he had to tell us.

Justin Lin Says He's Met With James Cameron & Arnold Schwarzenegger To Talk 'Terminator 5'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 11, 2011 8:00 AM
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  • 6 Comments
Confirms He'll Direct 'Fast And Furious 6' As His Next ProjectEXCLUSIVE: Earning over $600 million worldwide, "Fast Five" is one of the biggest hits of the year, and not only is it the most successful entry in the franchise so far, director Justin Lin proved there is still plenty of fuel in the tank and Universal agrees -- they have already dated a sequel for May 24, 2013. The film launched Lin into tentpole territory, with the studio landing the rights to "The Terminator" sequel for the director. And while the project will have to wait until series star Arnold Schwarzenegger gets the gritty thriller "The Last Stand" out of the way first, Lin is already getting his creative juices flowing.

Ruben Fleischer Initially Thought '30 Minutes Or Less' Would Have A Darker, 'Fargo'-Esque Vibe

  • By Edward Davis
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  • August 10, 2011 7:02 AM
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Filmmaker Talks Killing Off Characters & The Surprising Survivors Of This Action Comedy & MoreExclusive: Dwayne and Travis (Danny McBride and Nick Swardson), two lazy, but conniving white-trash layabouts, want to open up a tanning salon, but they're broke and Travis' dad (Fred Ward) is a millionaire who refuses to give his indolent son any money. A crazy and circuitous scheme is hatched: kill dad. Where will they get the money to hire an assassin? It's elementary: just force some nobody pizza boy (Jesse Eisenberg) to rob a bank by knocking him out and strapping a bomb to his chest.

'The Change-Up' Director David Dobkin Says R-Rated Comedies Should Make You Feel "A Little Sick"

  • By Leah Zak
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  • August 5, 2011 7:32 AM
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  • 0 Comments
We're certainly not the first to say it, but the R-rated Comedy New Wave (La Nouvelle Vulgaire?) is raking in the dough. Once something you had to watch on Comedy Central after midnight, the turn of the century has seen the raunchy comedy genre steadily edging its way into guaranteed box office (and DVD sales) gold. And, arguably, "The Change-Up" director David Dobkin was amongst its pioneers. With 2005's "Wedding Crashers," the filmmaker managed to create an R-rated comedy but with enough broad appeal that it provided quality laughs, as well as ticket sales -- a lot of ticket sales (over $280 million worldwide). Since then, similar comedies like "The Hangover" and "Bridesmaids" have been giving your typical summer blockbuster a run for their money, and this weekend Dobkin is stepping up to the plate again with "The Change-Up," a less-than-wholesome take on the body-switch comedy genre starring Jason Bateman and Ryan Reynolds. We recently had the opportunity to hear from the director on his new film, as well as what he had to say about the genre itself and his approach to going Gross Out.

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