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Miranda July Cut An "Accidentally Porny" Sex Scene From 'The Future'

  • By Mark Zhuravsky
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  • July 26, 2011 2:47 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Dead Cats, Dirty Limericks, Getting Locked In A Closet & More We Learned About Miranda July's LatestWhen our own James Rocchi saw Miranda July's latest film, "The Future" at Sundance back in January, he noted the film succeeded "as a single story about the terrifying possibilities of life, the uncertainty of love and the certainty of the passage of time." A month later, we caught up with July at SXSW, she mirrored his thoughts on the film calling "The Future" a "a horror movie about facing the void, the empty moment where you don’t know what to do with yourself." And it's in that pre-mid-life crisis of sorts that "The Future" finds its compelling pulse.

Comic-Con '11: Vampires --The Biting Kind -- Are Back With 'Fright Night' & 'Underworld: Awakening'

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • July 23, 2011 3:21 AM
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Though "Breaking Dawn" has captured the hearts of teens and their moms, the brutal, blood-sucking, non-sparkly vampire remains immortal. After Thursday's "Twilight" lovefest, Comic-Con's Hall H was taken over by two vehicles for the meaner brand of the undead with "Fright Night" and "Underworld: Awakening" on Friday. "Fright Night" reimagines the '80s classic, this time casting Colin Farrell as the not-so-neighborly vamp Jerry and Anton Yelchin as the threatened boy next door. Meanwhile, "Underworld: Awakening" revives Kate Beckinsale's role in the franchise as her Selene comes out of a coma after more than a decade.

Interview: Brit Marling Takes Us On A Tour Of 'Another Earth'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • July 19, 2011 10:40 AM
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  • 1 Comment
In this week's "Another Earth," rising star Brit Marling plays Rhoda, a troubled young woman who is released from prison after serving a sentence for a fatal drunk driving incident. She eventually comes into the life of the grieving father John (William Mapother) whose child she killed all while the rest of the world deals with a mirror version of Earth appearing in the sky, hidden behind the Sun. Marling, who co-wrote the film with director Mike Cahill, has become a major personality in the indie film world with both "Another Earth" and "Sound Of My Voice" (also co-written by, and starring Marling) surprising both the arthouse and genre fans as they've done the festival rounds. "Another Earth" walked away from Sundance this year with a distribution deal with Fox Searchlight and two prizes for director Mike Cahill.

Interview: Writers Christopher Marcus & Stephen McFeely Discuss Patriotism & ‘Captain America'

  • By Jeff Otto
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  • July 19, 2011 2:22 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Marvel’s most patriotic superhero, Captain America, is finally getting his just due on the big screen after years of attempts and misfires like the corny 1990 release you’ve probably never heard of (count yourself lucky) featuring Matt Salinger in the red, white and blue man tights.

Interview: Errol Morris Talks The Anxiety Of Making 'Tabloid' & Finding The Laughter In His Films

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • July 13, 2011 10:27 AM
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  • 2 Comments
In a time where documentaries are made cheaply and are often no more than glossy, agenda-pushing propaganda bulleted lists, filmmakers like Errol Morris seem even more admirable. Starting in 1978 with the amusing "Gates of Heaven" (which followed a number of people who had beloved animals buried in a California pet cemetery), the man alternated between scrutinizing the weird and picking apart the political, triumphing in both camps due to both his respectful and prudent attitude. He even invented his own interviewing technique called the "Interrotron" which, using two-way mirrors in a similar way a teleprompter would work, allows both camps to see the face of who they are talking to while directly looking into the camera. Because of this intimacy, Morris' films not only avoid the dullness that many talking head flicks fall into, but it also constructs a very personal audience connection to each speaker. As he probes into each subject, he's never condescending, but often unearths uncomfortable truths and manages to portray each person as not just a tool to prove whatever point he's trying to make, but as a complicated human being.

Interview: 'Horrible Bosses' Director Seth Gordon Reveals The Original Ending Of The Film

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 9, 2011 9:26 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Also Talks Improv & The Influence Of 'Shallow Grave'If your job is making you feel murderous, there is perhaps no better cathartic experience at the multiplex this weekend than "Horrible Bosses." The comedy stars Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman, Charlie Day, Jamie Foxx, Colin Farrell, Kevin Spacey and Jennifer Aniston and follows three friends, each dealing with an unbearable boss who is making their life hell, when they decide to do the unthinkable: they are going to kill their bosses. Enlisting the help of a "murder consultant" -- the appropriately named Motherfucker Jones -- the hapless trio sets out on their mission but of course, it's far more complicated than they ever could have imagined.

Michael Rapaport Talks The Heart, Soul, Conflicts & Issues Of A Tribe Called Quest

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • July 8, 2011 5:01 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Exclusive: To say filmmaker Michael Rapaport hasn't had an easy time in the press with his new documentary "Beats Rhymes & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest" is a bit of an understatement, but don't get it twisted. Since its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, reviews about the seminal '90s hip-hop group -- which included members Q-Tip, Phife Dawg, Jarobi White, and Ali Shaheed Muhammad -- have been glowing (it has an excellent 95% RT score). But like most longtime fans of the group, after they suddenly called it quits in 1998, actor and hip hop music aficionado Michael Rapaport was deeply affected by their split. "I felt like my parents were getting divorced," he recalled. His curiosity caught up with him over the years, and when the band was reuniting for the 2008 Rock the Bells tour, he quickly jumped on board to document the tour. But past frictions flared up immediately, giving the actor-turned-filmmaker a window into a world of the drama which was to come. "I walked into a fucking storm," he said of his first few days of filming the tour.

Interview: John C. Reilly Talks The Hardships Of Being A Guidance Counselor In 'Terri'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • June 30, 2011 5:29 AM
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High school is painfully dull, incredibly awkward, and definitely not what teen-comedies make them out to be. Sure there are parties and sex, but as far as the day-to-day routine goes, it's less like "American Pie" and more in tune with the "Elephant" (well, at least the film's first two thirds…) Maybe some of us have fond memories of those later teen years, but honestly, Judd Apatow hit the nail on the head with this quote: “College is the reward for surviving high school. Most people have great fun stories from college and nightmare stories from high school.”

Interview: 'Super 8' Star Joel Courtney Was Just Looking For A Commercial Gig And $100

  • By Leah Zak
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  • June 11, 2011 6:00 AM
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  • 12 Comments
Instead The Newcomer Landed the Lead Role In An Abrams/Spielberg Summer BlockbusterOf the varied critical reactions to "Super 8," everyone does seem to concur on one thing: that the film's young leads give some strong performances. But, with the exception of Elle Fanning -- who at the age of just 13 has already built herself a solid resume -- most of the group are new faces, most notably "Super 8"’s lead, Joel Courtney.

Monte Hellman Says 'Road To Nowhere' Was A "Group Subconscious Experience"

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • June 11, 2011 5:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
This weekend, Monte Hellman‘s “Road To Nowhere” opens. Somehow, no one has acknowledged that this is an event; Hellman, the vaunted director of “Two Lane Blacktop” and “The Shooting,” hasn’t made a movie since 1989. Things are a bit different this time around, as Hellman is working with much more unconventional material, with “Road To Nowhere” focusing on a murder-mystery happening in a movie-within-a-movie, with actors playing multiple roles within two separate storylines that keep dovetailing into each other. If you ask Hellman, who still believes, “No explanations, no apologies, and above all, no refunds,” this elaborate structure was more of an experiment of the subconscious, an attempt at trial-and-error than a purposeful artistic decision.

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