Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Wim Wenders Says 3D Has "Amazing Consequences," Still Waiting For Film That Cracks The 3D Code

  • By Edward Davis
  • |
  • October 18, 2011 8:10 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Venerable Filmmaker Praises ‘Avatar,’ Talks 'Pina' & Speaks Candidly About Hollywood’s Current 3D DilemmaWhile it might not seem apparent at first, given his films haven't made much of a commercial dent in recent years, Wim Wenders, is still ahead of the curve. In 1997, over a decade before its use became prevalent, he shot sequences of his "The End of Violence" film in HD, he cast Michelle Williams as his lead in the little seen "Land Of Plenty" before she became fully noticed in "Brokeback Mountain," and for his latest trick he's shot "Pina," a documentary about the medium of dance in 3D.

NYFF: George Clooney & Alexander Payne Discuss The Notions Of Forgiveness In ‘The Descendants'

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • October 17, 2011 2:58 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Judy Greer, Beau Bridges, Robert Forster & The Entire Cast Of Payne’s New Dramedy Talk Film At New York Film FestivalThe New York Film Festival went out with a bang on its last day, Sunday, October 16. Not only did George Clooney make a surprise visit to the press conference of Alexander Payne’s new comedic drama, "The Descendants,” but the entire cast came out to support the film including two newcomer leads, Shailene Woodley and Amara Miller, but also Robert Forster, Beau Bridges, Judy Greer, Matthew Lillard and Nick Krause.

NYFF '11: 'Kid With A Bike' Directors The Dardennes Say They Originally Planned A Different Ending

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • October 15, 2011 7:27 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Reveal That Holly Hunter Is One Of The Hollywood Stars Who Has Expressed Interest In Working With Them What can be said about the Dardenne brothers that five Cannes awards don't already say much more definitively? Even a mediocre splotch in their oeuvre is twelve notches above most other contemporary films that get paraded around on the blogosphere.

NYFF '11: 'The Artist' Director Michel Hazanavicius Credits Orson Welles As One Of Many Influences

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • October 15, 2011 6:49 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Director Wanted To Revive Silent Movie Style For A Contemporary Movie AudienceDespite stealing audiences' hearts and walking away from the prestigious Cannes Film Festival with the Best Actor Award, Michel Hazanavicius's nostalgia-fueled silent feature "The Artist" may have its work cut out for it. Will regular movie-goers go and see something like this in an era when the mere thought of a flick not being in color is appalling? It's a tough call, but with the right push, it might get sales solely based on the fact it's unlike anything in at the cineplex today. After that, all the movie needs is five minutes: it's an instant charmer, an escapist picture done with flair and an enormous amount of heart.

NYFF: Wes Anderson & Cast Of 'Royal Tenenbaums' Talk The Challenges Of Working With Gene Hackman

  • By Cory Everett
  • |
  • October 15, 2011 6:42 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Bill Murray, Gwyneth Paltrow, Anjelica Houston & Noah Baumbach Discuss Film At NYFF 10th Anniversary ScreeningThe 49th New York Film Festival is wrapping up this weekend and there have already been many highlights but there are still a few more films left to screen. Arguably one of the most anticipated events of this year’s NYFF wasn't a premiere at all but rather a film that had its world premiere at the festival a decade ago, Wes Anderson's "The Royal Tenenbaums." The now-classic film features probably the director’s starriest cast to date, and he brought along a few of those cast members for a special 10th Anniversary Screening on Thursday night. Just prior to the screening Anderson gathered before a few hundred fans at The Apple Store a few blocks from Lincoln Center for a Q&A in their Meet The Filmmaker series (moderated by our own editor-in-chief Rodrigo Perez) before heading down to Alice Tully Hall to introduce the screening, this time joined by Bill Murray, Gwyneth Paltrow and Anjelica Huston along with his brother Eric Chase Anderson, who provided all of Ritchie’s artwork in the film.

NYFF '11 Review: George Clooney Grapples With Life, Death & Fatherhood In ‘The Descendants’

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • October 14, 2011 9:36 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Marked by a strong, soulful performance by George Clooney, simple and economic direction, and a slow and patient gait, “The Descendants” finds filmmaker Alexander Payne working in the familiar, but not derivative, milieu of the adult drama. The film doesn’t reinvent the wheel, and while firmly within Payne’s wheelhouse, we can see the filmmaker inching towards pure drama without dramedy or resorting to the James L. Brooks method of punctuating pain with disarming laughter. That’s not to say “The Descendants” isn’t a dramedy or isn’t funny, as it certainly has its moments of comedic flair that do defuse some painful moments, but overall, one can argue that it’s Payne’s most somber and serious work outside of maybe “About Schmidt.” And it’s not without its problems either.

NYFF '11 Review: 'Policeman' A Strong, Haneke-Inspired Rumination On Israeli Society

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • October 14, 2011 3:03 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
While it's absolutely an important issue that deserves coverage, we've already heard nearly every angle of the Israel-Palestine conflict seventy times over -- so much so that we barely have a clue about their other dilemmas. One of these issues starting to come to light is the large economic disparity that exists among the Israelis themselves, resulting in many protests against the abnormally high cost of living. In his assured debut "Policeman," journalist/novelist Nadav Lapid tackles this very problem with a reserved strength rarely seen in a filmmaker so green.

NYFF '11: Pedro Almodóvar Talks The Identity And Gender Themes Of ‘The Skin I Live In’

  • By Mark Zhuravsky
  • |
  • October 13, 2011 5:16 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Director Discusses Finding Humor In Tragedy, Differences Between Men And Women, And MoreWhen we first laid our eyes upon Pedro Almodóvar's "The Skin I Live In" at Cannes, we called it a film that "snaps between bright glittering glamour and dark, doomed horror," and emerges largely triumphant, "uniquely beautiful and distinctively imperfect." The reception for Almodóvar's latest in the Big Apple has been similarly apprehensive and appreciative; the audience's reaction at last Tuesday's press screening was a testament to the polarizing nature of the film. Almodóvar and stars Antonio Banderas and Elena Anaya were present with a translator in tow, and the conversation was by turns amusing and laid-back, touching on themes and concepts native to the story. While our own Jen Vineyard turned in an excellent piece digging deep into the specifics of the production, this time most of the questions were addressed to Almodóvar, who fielded them with ease, occasionally utilizing the translator for particularly verbose answers.

NYFF '11: Eddie Redmayne Says 'My Week With Marilyn' A Celebration Of Old School Filmmaking

  • By Gabe Toro
  • |
  • October 13, 2011 4:40 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Rising British actor Eddie Redmayne has packed a career’s worth of activity into a short time. He's already won a Tony Award, is well regarded for his stage efforts and is quickly making headway on both the small and big screen. He features in the mini-series "The Pillars Of Earth," has appeared in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" and "The Other Boleyn Girl," however, “My Week With Marilyn” is where he’s got his biggest, showiest role to date. As third assistant director Colin Clark, he’s not only got to manage the egos on the set of “The Princess And The Showgirl,” he’s also tasked with being Marilyn Monroe’s unofficial “handler.” And like anyone else who orbited the star, he winds up falling for her.

NYFF: Pedro Almodóvar Told Antonio Banderas To Watch Cary Grant Movies To Prep For 'Skin I Live In'

  • By Jen Vineyard
  • |
  • October 12, 2011 3:26 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
The Director Reveals He's Not Doing A Biopic On Mina; Tension, Twists & More From The Team Behind The FilmPedro Almodóvar crafts a creepy Frankenstein-esque tale of rape, revenge, and survival in "The Skin I Live In" – a polarizing film which is one of his most ambitious yet. Because the movie features an unexpected twist halfway through the film, discussing it becomes difficult – how do you debate the themes, the issues and the meaning without giving it all away? We leave that task to the esteemed director and his cast that includes Antonio Banderas and Elena Anaya, who hit NYFF this week to present this latest concoction, a tale unlike anything Almodóvar has put on the big screen before. Covering everything from the twist in the movie (don't worry, we won't reveal it here), the reason why Antonio Banderas had to watch Cary Grant movies to prepare for the film, and the themes of identity that run through the story, the trio were happy to discuss in detail the quirky, provocative and unforgettable film.

Email Updates

Recent Comments