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'Breaking Bad,' 'House Of Cards' & 'Behind The Candelabra' Among Big Emmy Winners

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 23, 2013 8:56 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Last night TV's finest -- which these days tends to include some of movie's finest too -- gathered for the Emmy Awards, while the the rest of us stayed glued to "Breaking Bad" and to some extent, the series finale of "Dexter." Either way, both options were better than that dubstep dance routine to "Breaking Bad" on the awards show. And once the jokes were over, and tributes were finished, some statues were handed out honoring some fine folks.

Recap: Aaron Sorkin Finally Gets It Right With The Season 2 Finale Of 'The Newsroom'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 17, 2013 10:04 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Before diving in, a bit of a disclaimer and/or explanation is in order. Thanks to TIFF taking me away from the television for a couple of weeks, followed by some bungling couriers and concluding in massive fatigue upon returning from Toronto, "The Newsroom" slipped off the immediate radar. And a show you might have heard of called "Breaking Bad" took priority over the weekend. But with Walter White's latest adventures concluded for now, I finally got a chance to catch up with the last two episodes of "The Newsroom."

Recap: 'The Newsroom' Season 2, Episode 7 'Red Team III'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 26, 2013 10:56 AM
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  • 5 Comments
We've been pretty hard on "The Newsroom" this season, to the dismay of some readers, but it's simply because the show hasn't lived up to expectations. If the first season was rocky, there was lots of promise, much of which has evaporated over the course of the last six episodes, with Aaron Sorkin's work, at it's worst, delivering screechingly pointed screenplays, one dimensional characters and some truly egregious plotting. It has been reported that after the first two episodes of the second season were written and shot, Sorkin went back and redid them, and unfortunately, you can tell. So much of this season has been spent putting pieces into position, in a manner that in hindsight, seems both haphazard and particularly drawn out. Well, the good news is for all the flaws "The Newsroom" has show this summer, last night it delivered the best episode the show has had since the first season.

Recap: 'The Newsroom,' Season 2, Episode 6 'One Step Too Many'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 19, 2013 11:21 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Yes, I know — I missed an episode last week. A dual combo of screeners not arriving in time and a brief vacation keeping me away from the television led to that one getting missed out on, but really, not much happened in season two's fifth episode "Will McAvoy's News Night." Oddly enough, for such a condensed season already (only nine episodes), it was something of placeholder. You've probably already caught up but in case you missed that one: Will's Dad died; Maggie has developed a drinking problem since Uganda, and it might be affecting her work; Sloan had some intimate photos uploaded to the web by a shitty ex-boyfriend, who she later kicked in the balls; Jim outsmarts a prank caller; and Charlie got his hands on a helo manifest which seems to indicate chemicals weapons of some kind were indeed brought along during Operation Genoa.

Recap: 'The Newsroom,' Season 2, Episode 4 'Unintended Consequences'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 5, 2013 10:02 AM
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  • 6 Comments
If last week's "Willie Pete" was a narrative pit stop in an already shortened nine-episode season, "The Newsroom" kicked back into full gear on Sunday with "Unintended Consequences." Lawyer Rebecca Halliday (Marcia Gay Harden) returns to continue her deposition of the staff, with Maggie Jordan's (Alison Pill) life-altering Uganda story finally being told, the Operation Genoa investigation bearing more fruit and the organizers behind Occupy Wall Street once again getting kicked in the nuts. Basically, it's more of the same in a season that continues disappoint after a patchy but much more involving first season. As we hit the halfway mark of season two (with "The Newsroom" notably still not renewed for a third season), here's hoping the second half sees things turning around.

Recap: 'The Newsroom,' Season 2, Episode 3 'Willie Pete'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 29, 2013 9:56 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Occupy Wall Street! Operation Genoa! Uganda! Mitt Romney! Troy Davis! Netflix splitting into two companies! (Yep, a passing reference was made to that quickly aborted blunder). "The Newsroom" has had a lot going on across the first two episodes, so much so that Aaron Sorkin felt compelled to rewrite and reshoot large portions of them, as he got started on work for the third episode. And in many ways, "Willie Pete" does feel like a very conscious pivot point episode, one where the focus shifts primarily to the character relationships and ditches covering a breaking news story, a least for the moment. The result? Probably the weakest episode of the new season thus far, and one that strains to reshuffle the deck only to leave everything exactly where it was when it started.

Recap: 'The Newsroom' Season 2, Episode 2 'The Genoa Tip'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 22, 2013 10:03 AM
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  • 5 Comments
If last week's premiere was the small pebble, rolling down the mountain of the second season of "The Newsroom," you can start seeing the eventual massive snowball forming with the second episode. This new approach from Aaron Sorkin, with one large news story anchoring the narrative, is an interesting touch, but it doesn't get in the way of his usual combination of lefty liberal political posturing, speech-ifying, genuine drama and truly shameful emotional manipulation. And this week's "The Genoa Tip" has it in spades with a finale that nearly tips over into offensive bad taste.

Recap: 'The Newsroom' Season 2 Episode 1, 'The First Thing We Do, Let's Kill All The Lawyers'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 15, 2013 9:58 AM
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  • 6 Comments
After a rocky first season, both compelling and cringe-worthy in equal doses, and sometimes all at the same time, Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom" is back for a second season and it has undergone some significant retooling. The writers' room was given a shakeup, and even as production got underway, Sorkin seemingly changed plans midstream. After the first two episodes had been shot, and while Sorkin was writing the third, he realized his story wasn't going to play out way he wanted. So he went to HBO, asked to reshoot major portions of the first two episodes and rewrite the third, which they agreed to, though the cost was dropping the season order from ten to nine episodes. So, what was the result of all this overhauling? Well, mostly more of the same, outside of one key structural difference.

Watch: 2 New Clips From HBO's 'The Newsroom' Plus Supercut Of Every Instance Of The Word “News” On The Show

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • July 12, 2013 9:39 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Swerving in quality nearly every episode yet still sustaining a strong audience, HBO's “The Newsroom” approaches its second season with promises of rejuvenation and a return to form. Creator Aaron Sorkin has already discussed his decision to scrap the new season's first two episodes for story reasons, while also hoping people “take a second look” at the series overall, but now the network has released a few new clips to show off the end result.

Reshoots, Rewrites & Why The Second Season Of 'The Newsroom' Is Only 9 Episodes Long

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2013 9:17 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Before the first episode of "The Newsroom" aired, expectations were sky high for one reason: Aaron Sorkin. This was going to be the new show from the mind behind "The West Wing" and Oscar-winner who penned "The Social Network," and moreover, it was going to tackle the thorny world of cable news. But the results were far from satisfactory. Wildly uneven, and sometimes more polemical than dramatic, the show still managed an average of 7.1 million viewers per week, though critics were divided, particularly when it came to show's on-the-sleeve politics.

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