Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

The Films Of Roland Emmerich: From Worst To Best

  • By Drew Taylor
  • |
  • June 26, 2013 12:02 PM
  • |
  • 19 Comments
The Films Of Roland Emmerich
When it comes to bringing popcorn ready, big screen spectacle to the multiplex, there are few filmmakers (except for maybe Michael Bay) who do it with as much flair as Roland Emmerich. The German-born director has been making theater speakers rumble ever since "Universal Soldier," but he really made his mark in the '90s thanks to the White House exploding "Independence Day" (which has a sequel coming in 2015) and the monster movie "Godzilla." And since then, films like "The Day After Tomorrow" and "2012" have come to define the trademarks most audiences know him for -- high concept FX vehicles in which the world is at peril, but rescued by an everyman who saves the day.

The Films Of Powell & Pressburger: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • March 19, 2013 4:49 PM
  • |
  • 12 Comments
For much of their lifetimes, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger never got the due they deserved. Powell was as English as you could get, who'd worked his way up through the film industry, before coming to the attention of British film magnate Alexander Korda. Pressburger, meanwhile, was Hungarian Jewish by birth, who'd come to Germany in the 1920s to work as a screenwriter, moving to Paris, and then England when the Nazis came to power, and again was working for Korda. When the two met in 1939, there was an instant kinship. They shared a similarly uncompormising and original take on filmmaking, and were soon working hand in hand, sharing credit as writers, directors and producers under the banner of their The Archers production company.

Retrospective: The Films Of Steven Soderbergh

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • February 5, 2013 1:03 PM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
If there are two things that mark out the career of director Steven Soderbergh, they arguably could be described as a willingness to fail and a constant routine of creative calisthenics. A process-rather-than-results person, he has, over the last 24 years, been one of the most daring, unpredictable and restless filmmakers around. His output has run the gamut of everything from indie relationship drama to star-packed heist movies, from experimental, micro-budget thrillers to philosophical sci-fi, and from melancholy coming-of-age to kick-ass action.

The Films Of Spike Lee: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • August 10, 2012 4:05 PM
  • |
  • 32 Comments
If this weekend feels special for movie fans, it's not because of the trio of big-name blockbusters hitting theaters, it's because it sees a new dramatic feature -- the first in four years -- from Spike Lee, one of the most talented, idiosyncratic, maddening and controversial American filmmakers of the last thirty years. It's a rarity for a director to be instantly, iconically recognizable, but Lee's one of the exceptions, gaining visibility through starring roles in his early films, a famous appearance in a Nike ad alongside Michael Jordan, and plenty of moments when he's spoken his mind and caused an uproar.

The Films Of Christopher Nolan: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • July 19, 2012 2:04 PM
  • |
  • 25 Comments
We can all agree at this point that a certain sub-set of Christopher Nolan's fans are out of hand, what with the death threats to critics and all. But even if we were one of those who didn't like "The Dark Knight Rises," or indeed the rest of Nolan's output, we suspect that we'd still be glad he existed. While some might find his movies humorless (though we'd disagree), or chilly (though we'd disagree), or overly rigid (we'd... mostly disagree), but no one else is making films like Christopher Nolan, taking nine figures of Warner Bros.' money, pairing it with big ideas and concepts, and making resoundingly entertaining and thought-provoking blockbusters.

The Films Of Robert Bresson: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist
  • |
  • April 18, 2012 1:40 PM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
“We are still coming to terms with Robert Bresson, and the peculiar power and beauty of his films,” Martin Scorsese said in the 2010 book “A Passion For Film,” describing the often overlooked French filmmaker as “one of the cinema’s greatest artists.”

The God Of Carnage: The Complete Films Of Roman Polanski

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
  • |
  • December 16, 2011 2:54 PM
  • |
  • 13 Comments
With a career marked by controversy and tragedy, triumphs and disasters, that Roman Polanski has shaken off personal obstacles and professional setbacks is a feat in itself.

The Essentials: The Films Of Claude Chabrol

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • September 22, 2011 5:04 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
Claude Chabrol
Looking at the core French New Wave movement in broad strokes, you essentially get five Cahiers Du Cinéma critics-turned-filmmakers: Jean-Luc Godard, the all-you-need-is-a-gun-and-a-woman, pop-cinema deconstructionist turned oblique radical; François Truffaut, the humanist with an affinity for childhood; Eric Rohmer, the genial comedic moralist; opaque experimentalist Jacques Rivette; and then, over in the corner, Claude Chabrol. Considered by many to be the most mainstream of the group, with his sinister, provocative, Hitchockian impulses, the filmmaker was also appraised as a distant, sometimes aloof formalist, given his objectivist proclivity for eye-of-god morality tales that generally end in tragedy.

The Films Of Michael Bay: A Retrospective

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • June 29, 2011 5:44 AM
  • |
  • 19 Comments
Michael Bay,  Pain and Gain
Fuck Michael Bay. Michael Bay rules.

Retrospective: The Films Of Werner Herzog

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • April 29, 2011 5:21 AM
  • |
  • 10 Comments
Few filmmakers have had as varied, or colorful, a career as Werner Herzog. A man that Francois Truffaut, who should know, once called "the most important film director alive," Herzog has been knocking out classics, in both the fictional and documentary worlds, for over 40 years now. Perhaps still best known for his tempestuous relationship with Klaus Kinski, with whom Herzog produced many of his very best films, the director's oeuvre goes far beyond those five, from minor classics to eye-opening documentaries, from classics of German cinema to a star-driven remake of an Abel Ferrera film.

Email Updates

Recent Comments