The Playlist

Review: 'Thor' Is Overstuffed, But Still A (Mostly) Pleasant, Consistently Entertaining Surprise

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 5, 2011 5:07 AM
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  • 8 Comments
Note: Our U.K. writer saw the film early and this review was first published on April 26, 2011

Review: 'Passion Play' Is An Excruciating, Unbearable Disaster

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 4, 2011 9:49 AM
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  • 7 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from TIFF.

Review: 'Hobo With A Shotgun' Takes Aim At Good Taste, Obliterates Target

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • May 4, 2011 2:37 AM
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  • 2 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from the Film Comment Selects program at Lincoln Center.

IFFBoston Review: 'Terri' Follows An Odd Budding Bromance

  • By Catherine Scott
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  • May 4, 2011 1:59 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Azazel Jacobs has built a career on slow-moving portraits of everyday life. He first came to the indie scene’s attention with “Momma’s Man,” a film that wowed Sundance audiences in 2008. This year he’s back with a much more refined film called “Terri,” about an overweight, teenage outcast who finds friendship with the school principal.

IFFBoston Review: 'Bellflower' Is A Homespun Work Of Love

  • By Catherine Scott
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  • May 3, 2011 9:06 AM
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  • 0 Comments
One of the great things about watching films on the festival circuit is that reviewers get to see some crazy films. “Bellflower” was the strangest this writer has seen in a long time. It’s a film that will probably get a very small audience, but with a little cleaning-up, there’s an opportunity for it to find its place in the niche market.

Tribeca Reviews: 'Detective Dee', 'Underwater Love' & 'Let The Bullets Fly'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • May 3, 2011 3:43 AM
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  • 0 Comments
"Detective Dee And The Mystery Of The Phantom Flame"With the rise of China's first female ruler there came dissent. Also, there came spontaneous combustion, according to Tsui Hark's colorful, madcap mystery, where a poison has entered the bloodstream of several top advisers. No one knows they've been poisoned, of course, until they are greeted by sunlight, and the chemical compound erupts, flames emerging from their insides. This pseudo-science nightmare means only one thing: ruler Wu Zetian must unleash China's top detective (Andy Lau) who is in prison, and has fairly outspoken against her appointment. Oops.
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Tribeca Review: 'Roadie' And The Sad Aftermath of A Failed Life On The Road

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • May 3, 2011 3:03 AM
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  • 2 Comments
For some, life is a series of indignities. One second too slow, one step too far, and our dreams go unfulfilled. In every bar in the country, there is someone drinking away his regrets, trying to make peace with the records they didn’t break and the hearts they didn’t soothe. Michael Cuesta’s “Roadie” is a film about one of those men.

Tribeca Reviews: Rwanda's First Film 'Grey Matter,' France's 'My Piece Of The Pie,' 'Cairo Exit'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • May 2, 2011 2:19 AM
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  • 0 Comments
"My Piece of the Pie"When "The Company Men" arrived, people found it difficult to have sympathy for the three main characters -- each was an upper-class employee being fucked over by an even richer fat cat. Maybe it would've done some good to have one of the prominent characters be working class (Kevin Costner fills that void, though he's a side character that serves only to tease Ben Affleck and, in the end, teach him a lesson), as a character losing his BMW and country club privileges is only going to induce eye-rolls. French film "My Piece of the Pie" at first splits its time between power broker Steve (Gilles Lellouche, "Tell No One") and the recently laid-off factory worker France (Karin Viard, "Potiche"), portraying the former as a cocky playboy and the latter as a worn-out mother on the verge of suicide.

Tribeca Review: 'A Good Old Fashioned Orgy' Is A Good New-Fashioned Slob Comedy

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • May 1, 2011 6:20 AM
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  • 4 Comments
The slob comedy, an invention of the American counterculture of the sixties and seventies that tore down movies’ perception of onscreen propriety, has miraculously survived in various forms since Bill Murray and his “Saturday Night Live” cronies started smirking on the big screen. Every time someone thinks that the influence of “National Lampoon’s Animal House” can no longer be felt, a film like “The Hangover” emerges, tapping into the zeitgeist and pulling in record-breaking numbers, further establishing the modern onscreen male as proprietor of snark, juvenile tomfoolery, and general bad behavior.

IFFBoston Review: 'Dragonslayer' A Fantastic Portrayal Of Modern Skateboarding Man

  • By Catherine Scott
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  • May 1, 2011 4:24 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Though many haven’t seen Tristan Patterson’s documentary “Dragonslayer” yet, there’s a high probability that it will be one of the most talked about documentaries of the year, much like last year’s “Catfish” or “Exit Through the Gift Shop.” The film follows West Coast skateboarder Josh “Skreech” Sandoval in his daily life as he searches for empty swimming pools, smokes a lot of weed and comes to terms with life after fatherhood.

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