The Playlist

Review: 'Wrecked' Is A Car Crash You'll Want To Look Away From

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • April 1, 2011 5:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
“Wrecked” does a rare thing. While most movies founder in their third act, this indie survival film actually gets more interesting and watchable in its final 30 minutes. But it’s getting to that final third that’s the real ordeal here. You’ll have to endure the first half hour, with star Adrien Brody crying and occasionally panicking as he wakes up, stuck in a car at the bottom of a cliff with no memory of who he is. It’s 30 minutes of his unnamed character struggling to free his crushed leg from an even more crushed car, wondering who the corpse in the backseat is and worrying who he might be.

Review: 'Hop' Is Like Opening An Easter Egg And Finding Nothing Inside

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 1, 2011 2:27 AM
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  • 1 Comment
"Hop," the new animation/live action hybrid from the folks that brought us this past summer's surprise smash "Despicable Me," comes with a premise so ingeniously prepackaged that you'll wonder why nobody had come up with it before. A canny hodgepodge of "The Santa Clause," "Elf," and a handful of other holiday classics (or would-be classics), it hopes to do for Easter what these films did for Christmas, complete with zippy visual effects and a chewy moral center about the nature of family and togetherness.

Review: 'Cat Run' A Fizzy Soda Of Old School Action

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 1, 2011 2:12 AM
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  • 1 Comment
John Stockwell's movies as a director pop and fizzle like the sensation of opening a soda can. He's focused primarily, almost cynically, on the youth market, with films like "Blue Crush" and "Turistas" exploring the exoticism of sensual, almost exclusively American youthful exuberance. Unfortunately, the budgets and grosses have shrunk, and Stockwell finds himself on the periphery of a filmmaking culture, as someone who makes punchy cinematic candy that no one wants to consume.

Review: David Schwimmer's 'Trust' A Thoughtful Look At A Tricky Subject

  • By Danielle Johnsen
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  • April 1, 2011 1:47 AM
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  • 2 Comments
In 2011, we are so used to relationships blossoming through the internet and various social channels that it takes awhile into "Trust" to foresee the danger lurking. Directed by David Schwimmer, the triggering thriller manages to avoid the easy pitfalls of what could resemble an afterschool special and brings depth to the uneasy subject matter of sexual predators, internet safety and parental protection.

Review: 'Insidious' Is A Haunted House Movie That Leaves Us Cold

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 31, 2011 12:08 PM
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  • 2 Comments
The following is a reprint or our review from the Film Comment Selects program at Lincoln Center.

Review: 'Source Code' Is A Decent, But Familiar 'Groundhog Day' Meets Action, Sci-Fi Thriller

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 31, 2011 11:37 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The following is a reprint of our review from SXSW.

Review: James Gunn's 'Super' With Rainn Wilson & Ellen Page Is Twisted, But Uneven

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • March 31, 2011 11:05 AM
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  • 2 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from SXSW.

Review: 'Rubber' Is The Convention Defying Movie You Would Expect From A Pic About A Killer Tire

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • March 31, 2011 3:44 AM
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  • 1 Comment
"Rubber" is the story of a tire that gains consciousness and decides to kill. He doesn't talk, dance, or sing, and he doesn't develop any lasting relationships with any humans, animals, or fellow tires. How do you tell a story like this? "Rubber" seems to have already asked that question, which is why the first impression of the film is not of the tire itself, but rather the audience.

Review: 'Essential Killing' An Intense, Provocative & Slightly Absurd Survival Tale

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 31, 2011 2:19 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The name Vincent Gallo is a fairly divisive one. Just the very mention of it usually follows with an impassioned argument for or against the actor and certainly, he's done himself no favors. After breaking out in a big way with "Buffalo '66" the writer/actor/director/musician/sperm entrepreneur wasted no time in using any interview opportunity to slag off pretty much anyone and everyone. He followed up his gritty little indie with the infamous "The Brown Bunny," a road trip movie about a guy on a quest for a resentment filled blowjob. It was savaged by critics at Cannes and when it eventually arrived in a new edit, not even a climatic scene of explicit oral sex could get anyone to care.

Review: Oscar Winner 'In A Better World' Morally Complex, Well Made, But Not Quite Transformative

  • By Kimber Myers
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  • March 30, 2011 4:19 AM
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  • 1 Comment
When you see Susanne Bier’s “In a Better World” and people ask you if you had a good time at the movies, the answer will most certainly be “no.” Like Bier’s other work (notably “Brothers,” “Open Hearts,” “Things We Lost in the Fire” and “After the Wedding”), this 2010 Danish Oscar winner for Best Foreign Film is a serious, emotional drama about how tragedy simultaneously unites and divides us. There’s little enjoyment or entertainment to be had--and there isn’t meant to be--but Bier has crafted another solid film, and it’s easy to see why “In a Better World” won the votes of the mind-numbingly traditional Academy Award voters, particularly against the jaw-dropping Greek oddity “Dogtooth.”

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