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Review: Too Meta 'Human Centipede Part 2' Almost Reaches The All-Time Gross-Out Pantheon

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 24, 2011 1:35 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Is Tom Six a filmmaker? Is Tom Six a storyteller? No, at this point, you’ll have to conclude he is neither of these things. What he is represents something maybe more honest, more pure: he’s a provocateur. In making “The Human Centipede: First Sequence,” Six took a memorably deranged subject of medical dubiousness and turned it into a taut, often surprisingly funny shock fest, notable for its actual restraint considering the risible content. Lambasted for being a one-joke (one-gag?) premise, Six took advantage of a memorably deranged turn by Dieter Laser to produce a sterile, cold minor classic within the horror genre.

Review: 'Puncture' With Chris Evans A True Story Weighed Down By Oscar Reel Antics

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 23, 2011 2:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The following is a reprint of our review from the Tribeca Film Festival.

Review: A Brooding, Wooden Taylor Lautner Muddles His Way Through The Nonsensical 'Abduction'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 22, 2011 12:05 PM
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  • 18 Comments
In the future (it’s closer than you think!), celebrities will be an even bigger part of our society. While the pool of “famous people” will expand beyond movie stars, politicians and random public figures, we’ll find ourselves consumed by the public’s thirst for all things mega-famous. In this future, somewhere, someone will write a massive tome dedicated to the forehead of Taylor Lautner. Like the Monolith in “2001: A Space Odyssey,” it is massive, and says everything and nothing. It sits on top of the scrunched up Zardoz-of-a-face that is this curious manchild, at once Cro-Magnon and, yet, every bit representative of his teenage years. It's going to be a helluva book.

Review: The Politics Of Sex Are Explored In 'Weekend'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 22, 2011 11:23 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from SXSW.
More: Review

Review: 'Machine Gun Preacher' Is Essentially A Botched 'Rambo'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 22, 2011 6:03 AM
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  • 1 Comment
The following is a reprint of our review that ran during the 2011 Toronto Film Festival.

Review: 'Dolphin Tale' Is A Thoroughly Average, Squeaky Clean Family Movie

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 22, 2011 2:04 AM
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  • 7 Comments
In the new, squeaky clean family film "Dolphin Tale," based on the true story of an injured dolphin that is outfitted with a cutting edge prosthetic tail, there are enough civic and spiritual virtues levelled at you to fill several Sunday school classes. The importance of family, friendship, never leaving someone behind, accepting those with disabilities, respecting the ocean, and studying hard in class, are reiterated repeatedly, so much so that you suspect this may be a sly "Christian values" movie dressed up like an eco-friendly Saturday afternoon romp (it does come from the same people who made "The Blind Side" so keep that in mind). But the movie is set in Clearwater, Florida, which many will recognize as the cuddly epicenter of Scientology in the United States, and scanning the background of any particular scene you can see the monolithic Scientology center (the Flag Building, as large as a city block) looming against the pale blue sky.

Review: 'Toast' With Freddie Highmore Is Burnt, Charred & Flavorless

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 21, 2011 6:53 AM
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  • 2 Comments
To adapt a story into a movie is to lionize the subject, say some critics. It’s the same school of thought that believes you can’t ever make an anti-war movie. To that end, some would say, in a Warholian manner, that every person deserves their own movie, for such a designation would suggest a humanist approach to the narrative of a single person from within the global culture.

Review: Cameron Crowe's 'Pearl Jam Twenty' Is A Rousing, Wonderfully Atypical Rock Doc

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 21, 2011 4:27 AM
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  • 0 Comments
If it's not completely obvious, "Pearl Jam Twenty" is the name of the new retrospective documentary about the first twenty years of influential Seattle rock band Pearl Jam. But, as directed by Cameron Crowe, whose mind operates on another level of meta-textual cross-indexed pop cultural awareness, it's also a nod to the name of the first Pearl Jam album, Ten (the number of former New Jersey Nets point guard Mookie Blaylock, who the band was originally named after). In a weird way, the title is also evocative of the way the movie has been put together – unlike most standard rock band documentaries, its full of personal detail (Crowe was in Seattle at the time as a young music journalist) and wonderfully atypical shifts in tone and style. Those fearful of a feature-length "Behind the Music" can table those anxieties. This is the real deal with lots of surprising texture.

Review: Numbers Don't Lie In 'Moneyball,' Which Swings For The Fences & Hits A Triple

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 21, 2011 3:07 AM
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  • 2 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from TIFF with some corrections.

Review: ‘Killer Elite’ Offers Some Cheap Thrills But Not Much Else

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 21, 2011 2:04 AM
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  • 2 Comments
The following is a reprint of our review from TIFF.

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