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Review: Dense And Oblique, Monte Hellman's 'Road To Nowhere' A Welcome Return

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • June 10, 2011 8:53 AM
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The reemergence of a well-respected filmmaker will always draw the eyes of cinephiles everywhere; these once-master auteurs come out of hiding, hoping to recapture the energy and attention they once had. "The Godfather" auteur Francis Ford Coppola is currently enjoying a second career in film, and though he isn't making serious bank ("Youth Without Youth" couldn't even muster up $250,000 domestically), his latest output is some of his best work since the early 1980s. Few are as successful critically as that, and though we all have our dream lists (this writer can't be the only one hoping for a new Nagisa Oshima), some filmmakers can't restart the fire they once had -- often it feels like they're trying too hard to either keep up with current stylistic trends or forcing out a passion that they no longer have. Either way, these artistic resuscitations are often only ever seen as complete travesty or modern masterpiece, regardless of how detrimental those extremist labels truly are. Which brings us to this unfortunate question: which camp does "Road to Nowhere" by Monte Hellman (director of the great "Two-Lane Blacktop," absent from features since 1989) fall into? Depending on your affinity for David Lynch/Claire Denis-type narrative puzzles, it could go either way.

'Scott Pilgrim' Star Mark Webber Directing Drama Starring His Two-Year-Old Son

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 26, 2011 1:58 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Michael Cera, Shannyn Sossamon, Amanda Seyfried, Jason Ritter Also In Cast A year ago, it looked like indie veteran Mark Webber might be about to take a major leap in his career, as one of the more left-field choices among the top-notch ensemble of Edgar Wright's "Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World." While Webber was terrific as the neurotic, fame-hungry Sex Bob-omb frontman Stephen Stills in the picture, the disappointing box office haul of the film meant that the actor hasn't quite cracked the mainstream yet, even if it's gone some way to helping things along.

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