The Playlist

20 Celebrated Filmmakers Who Never Won A Best Directing Oscar

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • February 26, 2014 3:42 PM
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  • 27 Comments
Filmmakers Who Never Won A Best Directing Oscar
For better or worse (which at this time of year, as the punditry reaches its hyperbolic event horizon, usually feels like worse) an Academy Award is the highest honor anyone in the film industry can receive. But of course, like any large organization—even one that wasn’t, as of 2012, reportedly 94% white, 77% male and 86% over the age of 50—the AMPAS gets things wrong (shocking, we know). Sometimes due to the politicking of insiders, sometimes because the wind shifts, and yes, sometimes because of plain old-fashioned bias, the membership votes to award the lesser film, or the lesser performance, or the lesser accomplishment, while the greater one stays seated after the envelope is opened—if they're there at all.

Watch: Sidney Lumet’s 1955 Rejected TV Pilot 'The Challenge'

  • By Ken Guidry
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  • November 13, 2013 5:22 PM
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  • 0 Comments
It’s been over two years since Sidney Lumet left us, but what he left us with is an incredible body of work that spans six decades (be sure to check out our retrospective). From his first feature film “12 Angry Men” to “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead,” which came out 50 years later, those who wish to tackle his entire filmography could understandably feel intimidated. Furthermore, before Lumet even made “12 Angry Men,” he had already directed hundreds of television episodes from ‘50s shows such as “Danger” and “You Are There.” The Seventh Art has recently discovered one of his more obscure works, which had been posted on YouTube a few years ago by Princeton University with barely over 1,000 views.

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 9, 2012 11:00 AM
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  • 13 Comments
Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

'Drive' Star Albert Brooks Reflects On His Career & Working With Martin Scorsese, Sidney Lumet, James L. Brooks & More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • January 11, 2012 5:36 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Over the weekend, the Film Society of Lincoln Center put on a special event, hosted by Scott Foundas, centered around "Drive" star Albert Brooks, who is earning strong Oscar buzz for his role as menacing mob boss Bernie Rose. The night took a unique (and, it should be noted, unexpected) approach by focusing on the roles that Brooks acted in, instead of the ones where he appeared in something that he had both written and directed. The night kicked off memorably with the beginning of "The Twilight Zone: The Movie," a clip that still plays well today (you could tell that much of the audience either hadn't seen the movie or had forgotten about it completely), and from there it was a wonderful look back through the years, from his breakthrough performances to his role in "Drive." 

When Celebrated Directors Lose The Plot: Interesting Left Turns And Failures In An Auteur's Oeuvre

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • July 21, 2011 6:55 AM
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  • 86 Comments
Even the greatest of auteurs in cinema generally take one or two big missteps in their careers, either early on -- as happened to a lot of the Easy Riders/Raging Bulls generation of American filmmakers, bringing their hirsute hubris down to earth with a bump -- or later, when poor judgement and a degree of fossilisation can cloud a director’s vision -- see Quentin Tarantino’s remarks, for example, about not wanting to be a "geriatric" filmmaker, making films deep into his old age because this is when filmmakers generally lose their mojo, or Steven Soderbergh’s early retirement plans, which he hopes will see him exit filmmaking at the top of his game.

Oliver Stone Reveals Sidney Lumet & Al Pacino Nearly Made 'Platoon'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 25, 2011 1:57 AM
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  • 0 Comments
For director Oliver Stone, "Platoon" would mark the beginning of the meatiest part of the director's career. The Vietnam film, the first in a loose trilogy (followed by "Born On The Fourth Of July" and "Heaven & Earth"), made a star out of its young lead Charlie Sheen, and it went to the Oscars that with year with eight nominations, walking away with four wins including Best Picture and Best Director (not to mention that Stone's other film that year, "Salvador," also earned two nods). It would be Stone's second Oscar (he won for writing "Midnight Express" in 1979) and it established the writer/director as a major voice. But as he tells it now, he nearly didn't make the film.

R.I.P. Sidney Lumet (1924-2011)

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 9, 2011 4:51 AM
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  • 6 Comments
The streets of New York City have lost one of their greatest cinematic voices as legendary filmmaker Sidney Lumet has passed away at the age of 86.

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