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Review: Involving, Satisfying & Highly Entertaining 'Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • June 3, 2014 7:32 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Supermensch
It's probably safe to say that it's no mere coincidence that the subtitle of "Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon" recalls "Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy." Both men—one real, one fictional—are products of the '70s, a decade when drugs and women were easy and outrageous behavior was routine. When rising agent and manager Shep Gordon wore a t-shirt declaring "No Head No Backstage Pass," it was a sexual invitation certainly, but it also served as a bit of territory-marking. Here was a man who could get what he wanted because of the access he had, and Shep certainly didn't waste a second. But there is so much more to 'Supermensch' than simply sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll, which is what makes Mike Myers' directorial debut so involving, satisfying and even moving.

Watch: Trailer For Mike Myers-Directed Doc 'Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • April 25, 2014 10:48 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon
There are some people who were just made for fame, and legendary promoter/manager Shep Gordon is one of them. His story of moving to Los Angeles and running into Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison at the same time is the stuff of mythology, and his career managing some of the biggest names ever is epic. Now, Mike Myers (yes, Austin Powers himself) is telling the story in the entertaining documentary "Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon," and the first trailer is here to give you a good idea of what to expect.

TIFF Review: 'Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon' Is An Entertaining & Moving Doc About The Legendary Agent

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • September 14, 2013 11:56 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon
It's probably safe to say that it's no mere coincidence that the subtitle of "Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon" recalls "Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgundy." Both men—one real, one fictional—are products of the '70s, a decade when drugs and women were easy, and outrageous behavior was routine. When rising agent and manager Shep Gordon wore a t-shirt declaring "No Head No Backstage Pass," it was a sexual invitation certainly, but it also served as a bit of territory-marking. Here was a man who could get what he wanted because of the access he had, and Shep certainly didn't waste a second. But there is so much more to 'Supermensch' than simply sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll, which is what makes Mike Myers' directorial debut so involving, satisfying and even moving.

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