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The Playlist

Paul Thomas Anderson's 'The Master' Tops Sight & Sound's Best Of 2012

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • December 1, 2012 11:04 AM
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  • 52 Comments
It's December 1st, which means we're just weeks away from 2013, and critics will be compiling their 'Best of 2012' lists over the next few weeks. The Cahiers Du Cinema already got the ball rolling with their selection of the best films of the year, and now another venerated cinema magazine has unveiled their choices.

Watch: Trailer And 2 Clips For Miguel Gomes' Magical & Captivating 'Tabu'

  • By Joe Cunningham
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  • November 30, 2012 10:59 AM
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  • 0 Comments
As Miguel Gomes’ “Tabu” has worked its way around the festival circuit during the course of the year (and also during its theatrical release in a few lucky international markets) the critical acclaim it has garnered has been nothing short of stupendous. We were bowled over by it here at The Playlist when we caught it at TIFF, describing it as “charming, witty, beautifully shot and inexplicably captivating” and awarding it an A grade. Critics across the world seem to have been just as complimentary.

'Holy Motors' Tops Cahiers Du Cinema's Top 10 Of 2012; 'Cosmopolis,' 'Keep The Lights On' & More Make The Cut

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • November 21, 2012 1:23 PM
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  • 17 Comments
Well, Thanksgiving has barely started and the first top ten list of 2012 has arrived from the snooty folks (kidding guys, we love you) at French movie bible Cahiers Du Cinema, and as usual, it's pretty...eclectic...

NYFF: Miguel Gomes On 'Tabu' And The Pleasures And Phantoms Of Cinema

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • October 17, 2012 8:01 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Behold the courage of Portuguese filmmaker Miguel Gomes: hoping to do a film in the vein of “Meet Me In St. Louis,” he and and a crew traveled to the small Arganil Municipality in the country to begin work on a movie featuring a small family band -- that is until the movie’s investor died before signing the dotted line. Instead of calling it a day, Gomes pressed on and made "Our Beloved Month of August," a doc/fiction hybrid that captured the essence of the lively environment while commenting on the fragility and banality of a film production. It’s a special, beautiful beast of a movie that unfortunately didn’t see much of a release. Luckily, Gomes has quickly followed up with the brilliant “Tabu.”

TIFF Wrap Up: Our 5 Favorite Films Of The Festival, Plus Our Complete Coverage

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • September 17, 2012 2:04 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Like most festivals, the Toronto International Film Festival is somewhat frontloaded (much to the complains of many of its attendees), with most of the big films playing on or around the first weekend of the festival. But in fact, the festival wrapped up officially yesterday, and as we speak, The Playlist are officially departing the city for another year.

TIFF Review: ‘Tabu’ Is Magic Realism In Rapture, As Only The Language Of Cinema Can Tell It

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
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  • September 9, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
It’s been known that a singular moment during a brilliant film can make you realize you’re watching something special, something that will be deposited into your memory bank with a very high interest rate. In Miguel Gomes’ third feature film, "Tabu," this moment comes while you’re still getting comfortable in your seat. A film-within-a-film begins proceedings, in which we are introduced to an ‘intrepid explorer’ who, heartbroken over the one he lost, commits suicide and gets eaten by a crocodile. Then something strange happens, the narrator says: this crocodile adopts the melancholic state of the explorer and, as the film comes to a close, spends his time with the ghost of the explorer’s lost ladyfriend. Welcome to movie magic.

MIFF '12 Reviews: Miguel Gomes' 'Tabu' & Kim Nguyen's 'War Witch'

  • By Simon Dang
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  • August 20, 2012 2:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Gomes' Berlin Film Festival Golden Bear winner is an evocative, lyrical two-chapter love story separated by decades and continents that transcends what initially seems to be nothing more than an experiment in style over substance. Beginning in modern day-ish Lisbon, we are introduced to Aurora, an old woman mentally and physical deteriorating, in an equally frightening and hilarious performance by Laura Soveral. On her death bed, Aurora mentions a lover's name which is written off by two companions (her maid and an empathetic neighbour) as nonsense but, upon discovery of this man's actual existence and his arrival to the hospital, the film transports into a dreamy, fairytale-like flashback to the pair's African-set romance that audaciously couples the existing black and white, 4:3 and 16mm photography with a world where there's little-to-no spoken dialogue and narrated by Gian Luca (Carlotta Cotta with v.o. by Gomes himself) -- a character abrutly introduced only seconds before.

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