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The Playlist

Contest: Win Acclaimed Terrorism Drama 'The Attack' On Blu-ray

With the year coming to a sudden end, so begins our rush to catch up on the movies we missed this year, and one that many of us at The Playlist will be catching up with is "The Attack." Our own Jessica Kiang was ahead of the curve, falling for the "surefooted and fearless" movie at the Marrakech Film Festival last fall, and putting it on her Best Of 2012 list. And while the picture landed on our list of anticipated summer movies, a lot us still didn't have a chance to check it out. But that's about to change. Read More »

Review: ’The Attack’ Is A Gripping, Suspenseful, Fearless Drama Set Around A Suicide Bombing

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • June 20, 2013 8:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Something about its portrayal of a nightmarish descent into a previously inconceivable reality had us comparing Marrakech Film Festival Grand Prix winner “The Attack” to Thomas Vinterberg’s “The Hunt.” But the crucial difference is that while the Danish film is preoccupied with social concerns, “The Attack” plunges head first into one of the thorniest, most intractable political arenas imaginable: Arab/Israeli relations. It’s an audacious undertaking, to set a narrative, almost genre, feature film in a situation whose complexities and sensitivities might make the most engaged of us a bit gunshy, but Lebanese director Ziad Doueiri almost wholly pulls it off, delivering a film that engrosses and impresses like a thriller, even as it strays deep, deep into the belly of the beast.

The Playlist's 15 Most Anticipated Indie Films Of The Summer

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • May 7, 2013 11:58 AM
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  • 6 Comments
The Playlist's 15 Most Anticipated Indies Of The Summer
So perhaps the blockbusting sturm und drang of “Iron Man 3” has you slavering for more KA-BLAMMO, in which case our Most Anticipated Summer Blockbusters is the article for you. If, however, you're already getting a slight tension headache at the prospect of weeks upon interminable weeks of tentpole releases and the din of clashing opinions that attends the redistribution of billions of dollars of wealth, never fear. The gods of counterprogramming have been especially kind this year, and there's a wide selection of upcoming, smaller-budgeted, lesser-distributed gems in which the only things that collide are intersecting lives, the only ticking time bombs are repressed emotions, the only things that break are hearts, and the only things that blow up are grandiose expectations, right in some sad sack's face. You are also much more likely to get some full-on nudity.

Jessica Kiang’s Favorite Films Of 2012

  • By Jessica Kiang
  • |
  • January 4, 2013 1:56 PM
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  • 11 Comments
Step into my limousine and let’s drive around in the dead of night trying to find the corpses of 2012’s best films, shall we? Our journey will take us to the cornfields of Kansas, to tiny New England islands and to an explosion in a restaurant in Tel Aviv. We will talk to murderers and movie directors, we will celebrate friendship in Barcelona and suffer despair in the Phillippine jungle; we will get punched in the supermarket and mourn Phil Coulson. And then, just as we are sipping Fernet Branca in an Italian café, mercifully the apocalypse will arrive from below and that will be that.

Marrakech ‘12 Review: ’The Attack’ Is A Gripping, Suspenseful, Fearless Drama Set Around A Suicide Bombing

  • By Jessica Kiang
  • |
  • December 11, 2012 7:01 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Something about its portrayal of a nightmarish descent into a previously inconceivable reality had us comparing Marrakech Film Festival Grand Prix winner “The Attack” to Thomas Vinterberg’s “The Hunt.” But the crucial difference is that while the Danish film is preoccupied with social concerns, “The Attack” plunges head first into one of the thorniest, most intractable political arenas imaginable: Arab/Israeli relations. It’s an audacious undertaking, to set a narrative, almost genre, feature film in a situation whose complexities and sensitivities might make the most engaged of us a bit gunshy, but Lebanese director Ziad Doueiri almost wholly pulls it off, delivering a film that engrosses and impresses like a thriller, even as it strays deep, deep into the belly of the beast.

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