Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

The Playlist

Review: 'The High Cost Of Living' Can't Afford A Better Plot

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • May 12, 2011 9:35 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
This review originally ran during the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival.

Interview: Zach Braff Talks Micro-Budget Movies & The Challenges Of Playing An Unlikable Character

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • April 29, 2011 7:33 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
After making a name for himself as the lead in the hit TV show "Scrubs" in 2001, Zach Braff stepped behind the camera in 2004 and unleashed "Garden State" on the world. You might have heard of it. This little indie that could earned over $35 million worldwide on a $2.5 million budget, had a best-selling soundtrack and resonated with a huge audience. Braff rode the rocket up, scoring lead roles in the comedy "The Ex" with Jason Bateman and Amanda Peet and, more notably, in a remake of the Italian film "The Last Kiss" with an adapted screenplay written by "Million Dollar Baby" and "Crash" writer/director Paul Haggis.

Tribeca Review: 'The High Cost Of Living' Can't Afford A Better Plot

  • By Christopher Bell
  • |
  • April 28, 2011 2:16 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Just how out of touch are some filmmakers? There's a small trend of plots in which the main character commits a truly horrible crime of violent nature (which may even go as far as murder), usually by mistake, and their ultimate next move is to spy on the victim, befriend them, and pretend like nothing ever happened. This premise isn't just borderline offensive (a character tricking their victim for some weird personal catharsis? A writer composing such an artificial scenario just to tug viciously at our hearts?), its banality and self-righteousness basically paints the writer/director as someone who has never had anything remotely similar happened to them. Of course we all have our imaginations and we're all entitled to use them, but this kind of overdramatic falseness is rearing its head a bit too often (see Sundance hit "Another Earth," there's a slight variation in Andrea Arnold's "Red Road") to be given a pass. Deborah Chow's debut feature "The High Cost of Living" commits the same crime, banking on the misery of one person and the unbelievably low intellect of another.

Email Updates

Recent Comments