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The Playlist

David Chase Finally Reveals Whether Or Not Tony Dies At The End Of 'The Sopranos'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 27, 2014 11:42 AM
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  • 15 Comments
When "The Sopranos" came to a close after six seasons in the summer of 2006, it was a major television event. HBO's groundbreaking drama —voted by the Writer's Guild of America as the Best Written TV Series Of All Time— had over 11 million people watching the finale, which is still one of the most talked about moments in television history. With Tony Soprano seemingly surviving the chaos around him, he meets his family for dinner at a diner. Each member of the family arrives separately, while peripherally, potentially dangerous figures hang around. And just when Tony Soprano's daughter Meadow is about to walk in, the scene cuts to black. It was an ending that angered many fans, confused others, and led many to discuss what it meant. Was Tony killed by one of those creepy guys in the diner? What was the significance of Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" playing over the sequence? Was the show's creator David Chase just fucking with everybody? For years, Chase has refused to elaborate on the fate of Tony Soprano. Until now. Sort of.

Watch: Massive 4 1/2 Hour Talk With 'Boardwalk Empire' & 'The Sopranos' Writer Terence Winter

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 15, 2014 5:06 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Terence Winter
We're run featurettes, behind-the-scenes videos and making of documentaries here at The Playlist, but we'd wager there's been nothing quite like what you're about to watch below. Four and a half fucking hours, undiluted, with Terence Winter, the writer behind "Boardwalk Empire," "The Sopranos," "The Wolf Of Wall Street" and much, much more.

Martin Scorsese Says He "Couldn't Connect" With 'The Sopranos,' But 'Curb Your Enthusiasm' Was His Path To TV

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • December 18, 2013 2:10 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Martin Scorsese is no stranger to the thugs, hoods, kingpins and lowlives that keep things hustling on the streets, and he's chronicled that world more than once on the big screen. In fact, next week sees him in delving into the bacchanalia of the financial sector, with the very debauched, very R-rated "The Wolf Of Wall Street" (read our review). But as folks know, the ever busy director, in addition to his continually growing filmography (check out our complete retrospective of his work) has also got a growing slate on TV. At the top of the pile of "Boardwalk Empire," but you might be surprised to learn that Scorsese didn't quite cotton to HBO's gangland predecessor.

Podcast: The Playlist Talks 'Breaking Bad' Finale & Where The Medium Of Television Is Heading

  • By Erik McClanahan
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  • October 1, 2013 4:08 PM
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  • 9 Comments
On this latest episode, host Erik McClanahan is joined by Editor-In-Chief Rodrigo Perez, Managing Editor Kevin Jagernauth, our British correspondent Oliver Lyttelton, and later in the show by writer Cory Everett to talk about the recent "Breaking Bad" finale. But since we've already written about the episode, we try to dig deeper and do more than just recap the finale. Throughout the chat we spin off into other, grander topics involving television as well. How is the medium changing with streaming, binge watching and recaps on every site? Even though most people agree this is a golden age of television, there's still plenty of formulaic material and tired tropes found in even the best shows, "Breaking Bad" included. Warning, SPOILERS abound in this podcast so don't listen unless you've already seen the finale or don't care.

The 16 Best And Worst TV Series Finales

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • October 1, 2013 2:49 PM
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  • 92 Comments
The Best And Worst Series Finale
The world is still debating the relative merits and detractions of the final episode of Vince Gilligan's meth-world saga "Breaking Bad," with some quarters feeling that the finale was a little too cleanly told while others were filled with the sense of contentment from knowing that the final hour was a satisfying conclusion to a five-season arc that turned a meek chemistry teacher (Bryan Cranston) into a ruthless criminal kingpin. There are few, probably, who would take the stance that the last hour of "Breaking Bad" was one of the best series finales ever (or one of the worst). It simply was what it was. An efficiently told, occasionally silly hour of television that tied up a number of loose ends (maybe too many), while still leaving room for small areas of speculation and mystery. But as divisive as the episode might have been, it is nothing compared to the series finales of yore.

Discuss: Is 'The Sopranos' The Best Written Show Of All Time? The WGA Thinks So

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 3, 2013 10:17 AM
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  • 12 Comments
You've heard it time and again over the past few years or so, but we're living in a pretty great time for television. While of course HBO and AMC are leading the charge, with a fantastic slate of original programming, bringing talent and budgets that give big screen movies a run for their money, even network fare is getting more ambitious and daring (see NBC's "Hannibal," recently renewed for a second season). But is this really the best television has had to offer in the history of the medium? Or are we forgetting the decades of great programming that came before?

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