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The Playlist

TIFF Review: 'Man Of Tai Chi' Starring Keanu Reeves

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • September 9, 2013 1:40 PM
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  • 6 Comments
The Man of Tai Chi
Everything about “Man of Tai Chi” is awesome. Not awesome in the way you’re familiar, but awesome in the way Stephanie Zacharek described in her delightful review of “Inception” a couple of years back. “We've entered an era where movies can no longer be great,” she said, describing Christopher Nolan’s silly funhouse mirror adventure film, “They can only be awesome, which is not nearly the same thing.” She was right, and who better than to ignore the ramifications of that quote than the star of “The Matrix” himself, Keanu Reeves, here making his directorial debut?

TIFF Interview: Daniel Radcliffe & Juno Temple Talk The Horror Fairy Tale 'Horns'

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • September 9, 2013 1:20 PM
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  • 2 Comments
TIFF: Daniel Radcliffe & Juno Temple Talk The Horror Fairytale 'Horns'
Harry Potter no more, young British star Daniel Radcliffe is having a hell of a Toronto International Film Festival, starring determinedly in three very diverse features: he’s a hopeless romantic in “The F Word” opposite Zoe Kazan, a college-aged Allen Ginsberg in “Kill Your Darlings,” and a mourning lover confronting his very literal demons in Alexandre Aja’s “Horns.” We got to sit down with Radcliffe and his comely costar Juno Temple to talk about "Horns," which is still looking for distribution.

It's Like You're There! Watch TIFF Press Conferences For 'Gravity,' '12 Years A Slave,' 'Prisoners,' 'Labor Day' And More

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • September 9, 2013 12:32 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Press Conference TIFF 2013
If you are stuck having to watch all the Toronto International Film Festival action from the sidelines, fret not—another aspect of the festival will now come straight to your computer screen. The overlong, occasionally awkward press conferences that accompany each of the big films at TIFF have been uploaded to YouTube, so you can squirm in your seat while pretending to not play Candy Crush like the rest of the journalists in the room. This is literally hours of material, from big marquee titles like "Gravity," "12 Years a Slave," "Prisoners," "Labor Day," "Enough Said" and more. It's like you're there! Only not.

Watch: New Trailers, Clips for TIFF Selections 'We Are The Best,' 'Art of the Steal,' 'Starred Up' & More

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • September 9, 2013 11:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments
TIFF 2013 Trailers
Based off of the steady stream of crowd-pleasers, critical darlings, and uneven oddities that hit Toronto this past week, the Toronto International Film Festival could already be considered a runaway success. But an entire week more of cinematic gifts await, and we've got clips and trailers for a slew of them, including the latest efforts from Lukas Moodysson, Kurt Russell, and Ben Mendelsohn. While the buzz might have slightly died down about the festival, there's a whole lot still left to go!

TIFF Review: Wild & Vulgar 'Dom Hemingway' Starring Jude Law

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 9, 2013 10:05 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Dom Hemmingway, Jude Law
"A man with no options suddenly has all the options in the world," goes the liquor-soaked advice of Dom Hemingway (Jude Law). And while he admits that he has no idea what that actually means, he nonetheless lives that credo to the fullest in Richard Shepard's wickedly wild and vulgar "Dom Hemingway." It's not a surprise that our first introduction to the character is during a monologue that he's delivering on the magnificence of his own cock, a work of art in Dom's mind, as he certainly has lived his own life with his dick in one hand, a bottle in the other, a cigarette in his mouth, cocaine up his nose and women with their legs spread, at the ready. But now there's just one problem—he's getting old.

TIFF Review: Nicole Holofcener's 'Enough Said' Starring James Gandolfini & Julia Louis-Dreyfus

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 9, 2013 9:04 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The one constant surprise about getting older is that the ongoing lesson you soon learn is that you'll never figure it all out. Whatever you seemed confident and sure about at twenty becomes more nuanced by thirty and by the time you're seeing forty on the horizon, what was important two decades ago may seem trivial now. In short, life doesn't keep you on a consistent learning curve, and continually changes the game and the rules, but lets all hope we have the heart and small wisdoms of Nicole Holofcener's "Enough Said" to carry us through.

TIFF Review: Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Enemy’ Starring Jake Gyllenhaal Is A Haunting Look At Our Dark Desires

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • September 8, 2013 7:00 PM
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  • 14 Comments
At the risk of blatantly repeating ourselves, Jake Gyllenhaal and director Denis Villeneuve are on the cusp of a banner 2013 that is about to hit its crest. Their first-unveiled collaboration, the harrowing, Fincher-with-more-emotional-resonance crime thriller “Prisoners” has already bruised audiences in Telluride and Toronto (read our review here). But if “Prisoners” is the grimmest studio film you’ve seen since “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo,” then “Enemy”—chronologically their first collaboration—is the equally dark but more experimental and arty cousin. And a terrifically haunting one at that.

TIFF Review: Richard Ayoade's Daring 'The Double' Starring Jesse Eisenberg & Mia Wasikowska

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • September 8, 2013 3:38 PM
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  • 16 Comments
When Richard Ayoade arrived in 2010 with his charming tale of adolescence and young romance with the stylish "Submarine," the picture was immediately greeted with rather reductive comparisons to Wes Anderson. It was an unfair assessment levelled at the movie and filmmaker—even from those who championed the film—that diminished what an accomplished piece of cinema Ayoade had put together. And one can't help but wonder if "The Double" is a sly response to those criticisms of borrowing from others. Certainly, his latest will invoke names like Terry Gilliam and Michel Gondry to be tossed around, but make no mistake: not only does "The Double" confirm Ayoade as one of the brightest rising talents behind the camera, it's completely his own and unlike anything you've seen in cinemas in quite some time.

TIFF Review: 'Mad Men' Creator Matthew Weiner's 'You Are Here' Starring Zach Galifianakis & Owen Wilson

  • By Christopher Schobert
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  • September 8, 2013 3:25 PM
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  • 21 Comments
Owen Wilson & Zach Galifianakis in YOU ARE HERE
Matthew Weiner’s “You Are Here” is the worst “Mad Men”-related disaster since Sally Draper walked in on her father and Linda Cardellini going at it last season. And that was pretty bad, especially since Sally has already barged in on several passionate trysts—happily, not always involving her old man. “You Are Here” is far, far more soul-crushing: a supposed passion project that premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival with an air of mystery. Would Weiner’s first feature be a comedy? Would it have the feel of the modern television classic? Or perhaps seem linked to Weiner’s sitcom roots? And would it be any good? The answers to those questions are yes, no, yes, and my goodness, no.

TIFF Review: Götz Spielmann’s 'October November' Is A Disappointing Follow-Up To His Great 'Revanche'

  • By Christopher Schobert
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  • September 8, 2013 11:26 AM
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  • 1 Comment
October November
Götz Spielmann’s “October November” might be the quietest drama of 2013, an intimate, somber study of one family’s unsaid truths. It is also, however, a film that leaves little impression, making it a step backwards—or, at the very least, sideways—for the director of the stunning “Revanche.” Spielmann’s 2008 character study/thriller was deservedly nominated for a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar (2009), and drew an international spotlight to the Austrian filmmaker. His much-anticipated follow-up, “October November,” made its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, and while it plays reasonably well in a festival setting, it is unlikely to make waves worldwide.

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