The Playlist

Watch: Trailer For Todd Louiso's 'Hello I Must Be Going' Starring Melanie Lynskey

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • July 10, 2012 5:19 PM
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  • 1 Comment
While the movies have generally favored older men chasing younger women, often to comedic effect, the reverse rarely gets explored. And when it does, it's certainly not with the emotional weight and insight of Todd Louiso's "Hello, I Must Be Going."

So, Ben Stiller Pretty Much Made Sure Todd Louiso's 'The Marc Pease Experience' Didn't Get A Proper Release

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 18, 2012 5:23 PM
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  • 7 Comments
You would think that a comedy starring Ben Stiller, Jason Schwartzman and Anna Kendrick would be a no brainer for some kind of a release, even if modest, but back in 2009, "The Marc Pease Experience" was unceremoniously dumped on ten screens for one week only (and not even in standard release cities like New York City or Los Angeles) before quickly disappearing and living on in an eventual DVD release. It was an unfortunate to end to a film that had tremendous promise, but it was rocky production from the shot.

Sundance: 'Hello I Must Be Going' Director Todd Louiso On Working With Melanie Lynskey, Quitting Acting & The Influence Of Judd Apatow

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • January 23, 2012 6:40 PM
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  • 1 Comment
One of the better underdog stories from this year's Sundance Film Festival is "Hello I Must Be Going," from filmmaker (and sometime actor) Todd Louiso. After making 2009's "The Marc Pease Experience" for Paramount Vantage, the director found his movie marooned after the dismantling of the studio, appearing on a handful of screens before going (virtually) straight-to-DVD. This was a rather inglorious follow-up for the filmmaker, who had previously made the critically lauded Philip Seymour Hoffman vehicle "Love Liza." "Hello I Must Be Going" is not only a comeback for the director, but also a coup for its star, Melanie Lynskey, who is finally awarded her first starring role after her splashy debut in Peter Jackson's "Heavenly Creatures" with a role in a challenging, layered film. The story centers on Amy, a divorced and down-on-her-luck 35 year-old woman who is forced to move back in with her parents, and winds up in an unconventional relationship with a teenage boy. We spoke to the director about what it was like working with his wife on the film's script, his return to Sundance, the influence of Judd Apatow, and toll "The Marc Pease Experience" experience took on him.

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