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Tribeca Interview: Billy Crudup Compares 'Glass Chin' To 'Watchmen,' Wants Role In 'Star Wars 7'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 30, 2014 6:07 PM
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Glass Chin
One of the absolute highlights of this year's unusually robust Tribeca Film Festival was Noah Buschel's "Glass Chin" (read our review here). It's the tale of a down on his luck former boxer named Bud (played by Corey Stoll) who gets seduced by the criminal underworld. And there's no one more seductive than Billy Crudup, who plays J.J., a kind of loan shark/restaurateur, in a performance that borders on being downright mesmerizing. Crudup is a wonderful actor but in "Glass Chin" he taps into something really powerful and odd. And we were lucky enough to chat with him about the process of creating the character, which he equates to the experience making Zack Snyder's "Watchmen." Oh, and he gets a shout out J.J. Abrams for a "Star Wars" job too.

Tribeca Review: ‘Art And Craft’ Is An Empathetic View Of Talent, Artistic Obsession & Mental Illness

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • April 30, 2014 4:01 PM
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Art & Craft
In the art world, the name Mark Landis causes instant inflammation and or apoplectic emotional responses. One of the most prolific art forgers in the United States, Landis has duped art galleries across the entire country posing as an affluent philanthropist and art patron wishing to donate rare works from his collection. ​But the "gifts" that Landis is bequeathing are actually precisely constructed reproductions (Picasso, Matisse, et al) that he himself has painted. And his impeccably faultless craft is such that galleries across the country including the venerable Philadelphia Museum of Art and Art Institute of Chicago have been fooled. Mark Landis is public enemy #1 to anyone curating and exhibiting art.

Tribeca Review: Keith Miller’s ‘Five Star’ Is An Authentic & Affecting Urban Drama

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • April 29, 2014 4:05 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Five Star
Like a highly-rated Michelin restaurant, Primo is par excellence. A “five star” member of the Bloods in Fort Green, Brooklyn, Primo is akin to an Italian mobster’s made-man status; he’s untouchable. His word is bond. So when local teenager John’s absent father is killed by a stray bullet in the streets, Primo tries to bring the boy under his wing.

Tribeca Review: Genre-Bending Comedy 'The Kidnapping Of Michel Houellebecq'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 29, 2014 11:03 AM
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The Kidnapping Of Michel Houellebecq
In 2011, acclaimed novelist Michel Houellebecq disappeared. Given his politically conservative leanings and his often argumentative and incendiary prose, theories circulated about his life being threatened and in jeopardy. Houellebecq eventually surfaced of his own volition, but there is now a film to fill in those blanks, “The Kidnapping Of Michel Houellebecq." What tickles most about this diverting new movie is that it appears no one was more amused by the theories than Houellebecq himself.

Tribeca Review: Narrative Prize Winner ‘Zero Motivation’ Deserves All The Praise

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • April 28, 2014 5:49 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Zero Motivation
Satirical comedies set in the military aren’t aplenty in cinema. Sure you have “M.A.S.H” and “Stripes,” and “Dr. Strangelove” qualifies to some extent (though it’s more of black comedy about war), and “The Last Detail” (which really veers towards drama ultimately), but classics in the genre are far and few between. Even more uncommon, perhaps never-before-seen, is an Israeli military movie told from a female point of view as written and directed by a female filmmaker.

Tribeca Review: Best New Narrative Director Winner 'Manos Sucias'

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
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  • April 28, 2014 5:17 PM
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Manos Sucias
Joseph Wladyka's "Manos Sucias" is one out of a dozen feature winners from this year's Tribeca Film Festival. It's a startling and authentic slice of harsh life of a forgotten corner of the world, and the jury's reasons for awarding it mention Wladyka's involvement in the community and the months of research he spent getting immersed in the environment in order to shine the most truthful light possible on it. But, even without that knowledge, experiencing "Manos Sucias" in its brief 80 minute running time is all the indication you'll need to know that the award for Best New Narrative Director was deserved. First features are rarely spotless, and Wladyka's is no exception, but with the help of two fierce performances and a savvy cinematographer, this feature will fool you into believing that you're watching a cleverly disguised documentary, and stir up the proper emotions.

Tribeca Review: 'Beneath The Harvest Sky' Starring Aiden Gillen, Emory Cohen & Callan McAullife

  • By Nikola Grozdanovic
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  • April 28, 2014 4:42 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Beneath The Harvest Sky
Filmmaking couple Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly have been working together since the critically acclaimed documentary “The Way We Get By,” back in 2009. With “Beneath The Harvest Sky,” the duo are covering new ground, in more ways than one. They are stepping out of the factual world of documentaries and into the more nebulous narrative of fiction. Made-for-TV docs and short subject matters have paved the path to a full-length two hour feature for the big screen. And after dealing with seniors, and their lifetimes of experience, in "The Way We Get By" and "The Gambling Man" for PBS' “Lifecasters” project, they now turn their focus on the brazen youth who look ahead at the uncertain future. This shift in subject and medium ends up being something of a double-edged sword, but ultimately does the picture more good than harm.

Tribeca Review: Boxing Documentary 'Champs' Brings The American Dream Ringside

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 28, 2014 3:36 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Champs
For the most part, the genre of boxing documentaries has largely focused on the big fights and the pugilists with the most personality, and you could be forgiven for making a similar assumption about "Champs" on first glance. Legendary boxers Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and Bernard Hopkins take center stage in the film, but the story being told isn't one you're likely expecting. Joining the boxers are sports writers, professors, trainers and more, for a look at the sport through a sociological lens, one that sees the pursuit of boxing as the journey to the American Dream, and everything good and bad that comes with a system both inside and outside the ring, that is far from perfect. Less about what it takes to win a title belt, "Champs" examines what it means to be a man, in a sport that often views the competitors as animals.

Tribeca Review: The Sweetly Subversive 'The Bachelor Weekend'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 28, 2014 2:42 PM
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The Bachelor Weekend
It makes sense that, given the overwhelming financial success of "The Hangover" franchise, other films would take that formula (of a bachelor party weekend spun wildly out of control) and try to put their unique stamp on the situation. So far we've already had "21 and Over" ("The Hangover" in college), "Last Vegas" ("The Hangover" with old dudes) and, of course, the cream of the crop, "Bridesmaids" ("The Hangover" from the bride's side). What makes "The Bachelor Weekend" originally titled "The Stag" in Ireland) work, is that it is not content to merely replicate "The Hangover" formula with a slight alternation, but rather seeks to actively dismantle and the already established conventions, forging its own sweetly subversive path.

Tribeca Review: Landmark LGBT Documentary 'Mala Mala'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 28, 2014 1:22 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Mala Mala
To the uninitiated, the struggles of transsexuals and the transgendered in Puerto Rico seems like a narrow story to tell. “Mala Mala” doesn't waste time trying to give audiences a “universal” hook, nor does it exoticize its performers. Instead, this documentary is affectingly sensual, from its showy, salacious beginning into its startling behind-the-scenes intimacy. It's the scope of this doc, which takes its varied stories to the Puerto Rican government, that makes it a landmark LGBT film.

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