The Playlist

Tribeca Exclusive: Aubrey Plaza & Max Greenfield Ruin The Moment In Clip From 'About Alex'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • April 16, 2014 10:00 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
About Alex
One of our 20 Most Anticipated Films Of The Tribeca Film Festival, which kicks off today, "About Alex" already has us impressed by the cast director Jesse Zwick (son of Ed Zwick) has pulled together for his debut. Aubrey Plaza, Max Greenfield ("New Girl"), Maggie Grace, Nate Parker, Max Minghella, Jane Levy and Jason Ritter all feature in the ensemble dramedy, making it one to keep an eye on.

The 20 Most Anticipated Films Of The Tribeca Film Festival 2014

  • By The Playlist Staff
  • |
  • April 15, 2014 1:17 PM
  • |
  • 6 Comments
Tribeca 2014
So while the news that neither "Birdman" nor "Inherent Vice" (our no. 10 and no. 1 most anticipated films of the year, respectively) will be showing in Cannes may have us casting our thoughts forward to the fall festival season, there are still quite a few key events on the cinephile calendar between now and then. Indeed, the Tribeca Film Festival starts this week, and while the line-up overall feels more muted in profile than some years, there's still plenty that has piqued our curiosity in its slate.

Tribeca Exclusive: The Frame Looks Like A Million Dollars In Clip From Art World Documentary 'Art And Craft'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • April 15, 2014 12:02 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Art And Craft
The art world is no stranger to tales that are almost too unreal to be believed, but co-directors Sam Cullman and Jennifer Grausman have found another one in "Art And Craft," with the documentary making its premiere at the upcoming Tribeca Film Festival.

Tribeca Exclusive: Trailer For Documentary 'Fishtail' Narrated By Harry Dean Stanton

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • April 15, 2014 11:01 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Fishtail
Ranching is a profession that outside of industrial operations, is a fading one, with fewer and fewer making a living at it. But filmmaker Andrew Renzi takes a unique look at the last of a dying breed with his art film/documentary "Fishtail," premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Tribeca Exclusive: Watch First Clip From 'Loitering With Intent' Co-Starring Marisa Tomei, Sam Rockwell & Brian Geraghty

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • April 15, 2014 10:06 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Loitering With Intent
While Cannes might be dominating the buzz at the moment, on Wednesday, April 16th, the Tribeca Film Festival kicks off, bringing audiences cinematic treasures a little bit closer to home. And one movie to keep an eye on is "Loitering With Intent."

2014 Tribeca Film Festival Slate Includes 'Goodbye To All That,' 'Electric Slide,' 'Dior And I,' 'Starred Up' & More

  • By Joshua Encinias
  • |
  • March 4, 2014 12:00 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
2014 Tribeca Film Festival
The Tribeca Film Festival has unveiled the first half of their 2014 slate—that’s 47 of the 87 feature-length films—including the World Documentary, Feature Competition, Viewpoints, Spotlight, Midnight and Storyscapes. This year is Tribeca’s 14th festival and welcomes indie filmmakers and international celebrities alike.

Hurt People Hurt People: Neil LaBute & Alice Eve On The Intricate Roleplaying Of ‘Some Velvet Morning’

  • By Kristin McCracken
  • |
  • December 13, 2013 3:05 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Some Velvet Morning, Alice Eve, Neil LaBute
Since his award-winning debut feature “In the Company of Men” in 1997, Neil LaBute has developed a diverse career that spans writing and directing for both the stage and screen. Depicting unsettling and often cruel relationships between men and women, his work can be difficult to stomach, but there is no denying his unique voice. Over the years, LaBute has experimented with directing other people’s work, venturing into the horror (“The Wicker Man”), thriller (“Lakeview Terrace”) and comedy (“Nurse Betty,” “Death at a Funeral”) genres, to varying degrees of critical success. At the same time, he is a prolific playwright, with “The Mercy Seat,” “Fat Pig,” “reasons to be pretty,” and “The Shape of Things,” among others, making theatrical waves.

Review: Found Footage ‘Frankenstein’s Army’ An Uninspired Disappointment

  • By Diana Drumm
  • |
  • May 5, 2013 9:09 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
What can be written about “Frankenstein’s Army”? Don’t see it. You may say, "But it looks so interesting with its WWII-era steam-punk and maybe it’s so bad that it’s good." Just don’t. It may scream, “Come see me!” to horror and genre fans, but please don’t or if you must, at least make sure you have a clear path to the exit and/or ear plugs.

"The Big Studio Model Is Fucked": Watch A 1-Hour Talk With David Denby & A.O. Scott About The Future Of Film

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
  • |
  • May 3, 2013 4:33 PM
  • |
  • 11 Comments
The bell sounding the death of cinema has been ringing for years and years, with all sorts folks declaring at various times, that the artform is over. But there's no doubt that "cinema" (we're not talking about "entertainment") is in peril, at least at the studio level. Steven Soderbergh's recent address at the San Francisco International Film Festival decrying the current studio system is now the stuff of legend, but he's not the lone voice with that opinion.

Review: 'Michael H. Profession: Director' Is An Interesting But Never Essential Portrait Of Michael Haneke

  • By Rodrigo Perez
  • |
  • May 3, 2013 1:50 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Michael H - Profession: Director
Described memorably as the Minister of Fear by the New York Times some years ago, Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke has been terrorizing audiences and holding them emotionally and psychologically hostage ever since his career began. Fond of rigorous, excruciatingly brutal portraits of human suffering, misery and seemingly sadomasochistic torture, Haneke's vision of such painful aims is always unflinching, coldly dispassionate and cruelly voyeuristic. With the absence of joy, hope and relief in his movies, and a stringent, rap-on-the-knuckles approach that sometimes verges on being scolding, many have assumed Haneke to be a soulless misanthrope, humorlessly putting audiences through the paces because he can.

Email Updates

Recent Comments