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The Playlist

First Look: Clark Gregg In 'Trust Me,' New Pics Of Imogen Poots In 'Greetings from Tim Buckley' & Thomas Haden Church in 'Whitewash'

  • By Kristen Lopez
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  • March 11, 2013 11:39 AM
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In anticipation of the Tribeca Film Festival, the first-looks keep moving along. Let’s start with new photos from "Greetings from Tim Buckley," the quasi-look at the life of singer Jeff Buckley as he performs a concert for his father, Tim. The film, directed by Daniel Algrant, and starring Penn Badgley and Imogen Poots, will be getting its U.S. premiere in the Narrative category at Tribeca.

First Look: Alice Eve In Neil LaBute's 'Some Velvet Morning' & Zoe Kazan And Jake Johnson In 'The Pretty One'

  • By Edward Davis
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  • March 8, 2013 5:32 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Two Tribeca Film Festival first-looks for you this afternoon. First up is one of two Neil LaBute films landing within the span of two months: "Some Velvet Morning," which is debuting at Tribeca in mid-April. It stars Alice Eve ("Star Trek Into Darkness") and Stanley Tucci, and it's a relationship drama making its world premiere in the Narrative section.

First Look: Paul Rudd & Paul Giamatti In Phil Morrison's 'Almost Christmas'; Emma Roberts In 'Adult World'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 6, 2013 3:18 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Paul Rudd,Paul Giamatti, Almost Christmas
This is just the way things are in the movie world. With one festival about to begin (SXSW) we're already looking ahead, this time to the Tribeca Flim Festival. With organizers dropping their massive slate over the last two days, it has provided plenty for movie fans to pick over, and there are quite a few intriguing films on their way. And even more, some new looks are coming with them. So let's get it right into it...

Tribeca Film Festival 2013 Slate Includes 'Before Midnight,' 'Mobius,' Films With Naomi Watts, Vince Vaughn & Much More

  • By Diana Drumm
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  • March 6, 2013 2:46 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Tribeca 2013 Film Festival line-up, Almost Christmas, Before Midnight, Byzantine, Mobius, Adult World, more
The Tribeca Film Festival has unveiled a big batch of their 2013 slate, including the World Documentary, Feature Competition, Viewpoints, Spotlight, Midnight and Storyscapes line-ups. In its 12th year, Tribeca boasts an international, star-studded program that will welcome films that span the globe.

'Mistaken For Strangers,' Documentary On Band The National, Will Open The Tribeca Film Festival

  • By Cain Rodriguez
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  • March 1, 2013 3:40 PM
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Recent years have seen a rise in high-profile music documentaries, from ones that focus on a swath of history like Dave Grohl’s “Sound City” or ones that focus on a specific band or artist, like last year’s LCD Soundsystem swan song “Shut Up And Play The Hits.” Now, another New York band will be immortalized on the big screen; The National will help launch this spring's Tribeca Film Festival as the focus of a brand new movie.

From Best To Worst: The Playlist's Complete Tribeca Film Festival Coverage

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 2, 2012 3:38 PM
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  • 0 Comments
That's it. It's a wrap. The Tribeca Film Festival is over for another year. And while it was an improvement from years past, despite a promising line-up the festival proved to be somewhat disappointing: most of the best regarded films ("2 Days In New York," "Take This Waltz," Searching For Sugar Man" being three prime examples) had premiered elsewhere, while the more high-profile, star-laden of their world or North American exclusives landed with a thud.

Tribeca Review: 'Queen: Days Of Our Lives' Is A Good Overview Of The Classic Band's Career

  • By Cory Everett
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  • May 2, 2012 9:57 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Compared to other mega-selling bands like say, The Beatles, the story behind Queen is not quite as widely known. Formed in London in the early ‘70s, the band was responsible for a slew of hits over the two decades or so, traversing genres from rock to opera to disco sometimes within the same song, before singer Freddie Mercury died of AIDS in the early ‘90s. Told through archival footage and interviews with two of the band’s principal members guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor (bassist John Deacon has quietly refused to participate in any of the band’s recent activities since retiring a few years ago), “Queen: Days Of Our Lives” is a compelling overview of the classic band’s career. The group originally formed during college as an outfit called Smile before Mercury joined up and renamed the band which would eventually go on to record a slew of massive hits including “We Will Rock You,” “We Are The Champions,” “Another One Bites The Dust,” “Under Pressure” among many others.

Tribeca Review: Morgan Spurlock's Crowd-Pleasing 'Mansome' Is Cute, But Unilluminating

  • By The Playlist
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  • April 30, 2012 6:41 PM
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  • 1 Comment
What makes a man shave his chest? Sport a hirsute, ridiculously long and absurd-looking beard? Bleach his anus, thread his eyebrows or play around with his facial hair in any number of manscaping ways? These are some of the questions posed in Morgan Spurlock's latest cheery and congenial documentary, "Mansome."

Tribeca Review: 'Knife Fight' Is Political Mud-Slinging For Dummies

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 28, 2012 12:22 PM
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For those of you who felt “Ides Of March” was entirely too cerebral and challenging, here comes the dunderheaded “Knife Fight.” A political satire that treads no new ground, this name-heavy comedy wastes an engaging central performance by Rob Lowe, who is completely game to play all sides of the political machine, swinging from the gubernatorial rafters like a contemporary “Phantom Of The Paradise,” bent on sabotaging his opposition and leaving the system a scorched earth for his clients to walk over the ashes.

Tribeca Review: 'Una Noche' A Funny, Bawdy, Hopeful Debut Picture From Lucy Mulloy

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 28, 2012 9:16 AM
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  • 0 Comments
There’s a youthful energy running through “Una Noche” that threatens to overwhelm, from its sun-kissed first image to its final moments on the sands of the beach. Alive and vibrant, Lucy Mulloy’s often bawdy first feature is narrated by Lila, a blossoming teenage girl confused by her sexuality, alienated from the local girls. The language is Spanish, but teenage cruelty is universal, as her peers mock her slight body hair and tomboyish interest in taekwondo.

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