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The Playlist

Hurt People Hurt People: Neil LaBute & Alice Eve On The Intricate Roleplaying Of ‘Some Velvet Morning’

  • By Kristin McCracken
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  • December 13, 2013 3:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Some Velvet Morning, Alice Eve, Neil LaBute
Since his award-winning debut feature “In the Company of Men” in 1997, Neil LaBute has developed a diverse career that spans writing and directing for both the stage and screen. Depicting unsettling and often cruel relationships between men and women, his work can be difficult to stomach, but there is no denying his unique voice. Over the years, LaBute has experimented with directing other people’s work, venturing into the horror (“The Wicker Man”), thriller (“Lakeview Terrace”) and comedy (“Nurse Betty,” “Death at a Funeral”) genres, to varying degrees of critical success. At the same time, he is a prolific playwright, with “The Mercy Seat,” “Fat Pig,” “reasons to be pretty,” and “The Shape of Things,” among others, making theatrical waves.

Review: Found Footage ‘Frankenstein’s Army’ An Uninspired Disappointment

  • By Diana Drumm
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  • May 5, 2013 9:09 AM
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  • 1 Comment
What can be written about “Frankenstein’s Army”? Don’t see it. You may say, "But it looks so interesting with its WWII-era steam-punk and maybe it’s so bad that it’s good." Just don’t. It may scream, “Come see me!” to horror and genre fans, but please don’t or if you must, at least make sure you have a clear path to the exit and/or ear plugs.

"The Big Studio Model Is Fucked": Watch A 1-Hour Talk With David Denby & A.O. Scott About The Future Of Film

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 3, 2013 4:33 PM
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  • 11 Comments
The bell sounding the death of cinema has been ringing for years and years, with all sorts folks declaring at various times, that the artform is over. But there's no doubt that "cinema" (we're not talking about "entertainment") is in peril, at least at the studio level. Steven Soderbergh's recent address at the San Francisco International Film Festival decrying the current studio system is now the stuff of legend, but he's not the lone voice with that opinion.

Review: 'Michael H. Profession: Director' Is An Interesting But Never Essential Portrait Of Michael Haneke

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • May 3, 2013 1:50 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Michael H - Profession: Director
Described memorably as the Minister of Fear by the New York Times some years ago, Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke has been terrorizing audiences and holding them emotionally and psychologically hostage ever since his career began. Fond of rigorous, excruciatingly brutal portraits of human suffering, misery and seemingly sadomasochistic torture, Haneke's vision of such painful aims is always unflinching, coldly dispassionate and cruelly voyeuristic. With the absence of joy, hope and relief in his movies, and a stringent, rap-on-the-knuckles approach that sometimes verges on being scolding, many have assumed Haneke to be a soulless misanthrope, humorlessly putting audiences through the paces because he can.

Tribeca Review: ‘Gore Vidal: The United States Of Amnesia’ Is A Forgettable Film About An Unforgettable Figure

  • By Diana Drumm
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  • May 2, 2013 8:29 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Gore Vidal is fascinating. Whether you agree with his politics or you enjoy is witty brand of snark or neither, he led an incredible and prolific life – one that could encompass multiple documentaries and this ultimately becomes the pitfall of “Gore Vidal: The United States of Amnesia” as it tries to make a singular documentary of such a multi-faceted and well-known figure.

Watch: Complete Tribeca Talks With Darren Aronofsky & Clint Eastwood And Ben Stiller & Jay Roach

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 30, 2013 2:18 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Well, the sun has set on another Tribeca Film Festival, but with a packed schedule, we weren't going to have time for everything. That being said, it was a great year for the festival, with more than a handful of surprising films and performances which we broke down in our Best And Brightest Of The 2013 Tribeca Film Festival. But festivals aren't just an opportunity for movies to find an audience, but it's a place for talent to talk, mingle and share anecdotes and while we could find space in our schedule, thank the digital age for preserving these convos.

Tribeca: Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese & Jerry Lewis Reflect On 'The King Of Comedy,' Improv, Deleted Scenes & More

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 29, 2013 2:57 PM
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  • 2 Comments
The Tribeca Film Festival closed last night with a digitally-restored screening of “The King Of Comedy.” Thirty years later, the film still reverberates as an acidic take on celebrity worship that has, oddly enough, become timeless, and the re-master is gorgeous. The film was greeted with rapturous applause, but the real fireworks started after a raucous Q+A featuring a chatty Martin Scorsese, a shy Robert De Niro, and a more-than-eager Jerry Lewis.

The Best And Brightest Of The 2013 Tribeca Film Festival

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • April 29, 2013 2:17 PM
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  • 3 Comments
The Best And Brightest Of The Tribeca Film Festival 2013
And so we’ve reached the end of the Tribeca Film Festival. Known for its wide-ranging selection of films from all over the globe, they truly outdid themselves this year with a slate of diverse, boundary-pushing films that suggested that, outside of the most prestigious fests like New York, Cannes and Sundance, independent cinema was alive and well, flourishing in the fest’s eleventh year. We profiled twenty films at the start of the fest that might be worth discussion, and a number of those spotlight films didn't disappoint. But the excitement of the Tribeca Film Festival is that there's often greatness emerging from where you least expect it.

Tribeca Review: Iranian Oddity 'Taboor' Is Hypnotic, Lynch-Like

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 29, 2013 1:23 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Taboor
What to say about "Taboor," a film that feels as if it was beamed down from a backwards Earth? This maddening low-fi fantasy seems to share its DNA with "Holy Motors" in a story that revolves around the unpredictable actions of a man who keeps escaping definition. At first, he's just a frail, elderly gentleman waking in the late evening and applying his uniform, headed to work. Until you realize his clothes might as well be a costume of sorts, a puffy silver body suit folded upon itself with massive, slick collar. Is this man a superhero?

Tribeca Review: ‘Cutie And The Boxer’ Reveals Love Is As Complicated & Unwieldy As A Giant, Fanged Papier-Mâché Motorcycle

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 28, 2013 1:58 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Love is complicated, this much we know is true. But love is even more complicated, as Zachary Heinzerling’s brilliant new documentary “Cutie and the Boxer” illustrates, when the regular mechanics of romance (co-dependency, support, a nearly psychic transference of ideas and emotions) are housed within an artistic working relationship. Following the stratospheric ups and the depressive downs in the 40-year marriage and artistic collaboration between famed Japanese artist Ushio Shinohara and his wife, Noriko, “Cutie and the Boxer” delicately and playfully attempts to diagram how such a complex relationship functions (or doesn’t function). One of the most lively and emotionally resonant documentaries to debut this year, “Cutie and the Boxer” is a work of art in its own right.

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